The expression “no mames!”

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sioux4noff

no mames!

My husband has a buddy who uses the expression “no mames.” He (the friend) wasn’t very clear on the meaning or when one would use the expression.
Same with the expression “no manchas”.
Another expression the guys use is “te banas” , which seem to be slang for see ya later, but I’m not sure how polite a thing it is to say.
Can someone help my husband (and me) out?
Thank you very much for any help!

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travisdyer
There is a good reason why he won’t tell you the difference.

These terms should never be used by or in the presence of a lady. “No Mames” is a VERY rude and disgusting phrase to use in front of a woman, or strangers. “No Manches” Is a lot more decent, but it still is not proper Spanish. “No Manches” liberally means, “don’t screw (joke or play) around” or “quit screwing around.”

“Te banas” literally means bathe yourself. This is used between men, as a joke, to say don’t forget to bathe after having sex. It is occasionally used as a way of saying “goodbye”, but again, not to be used in mixed company.

Sorry for the descriptive explanation, but maybe this will shed some light on these phrases.

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Oscar2
“No Mames” I believe is a slang way of saying, Don’t Beg or Stop Begging.

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sioux4noff
Those descriptions are about what Harold got from his buddy Alex. Alex is a fireman, and Harold is a volunteer fireman. Alex knows quite a bit of English and knows the equivilent “vulgarities” for many things. Some he has a hard time explaining. Believe me, it’s not a matter of being polite! The things I mentioned are among the nicer things the guys call each other and say to each other.
And since they often forget I’m around and/or forget I am an “older lady” they do use those things when I’m nearby. They’re mostly a bunch of 18 – 25 year old guys so I don’t take offense, they are boys being boys.

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travisdyer
I have never heard that before, Oscar.

Wouldn’t “don’t beg” be more like “no ruegas?” The verb “rogar” means “to beg for.”

All I know is that my Mexican wife gets very upset when she hears it. I really don’t think it’s that innocent.

BTW, no, I don’t have another wife. My Mexican wife, Imelda, is the only one.

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Oscar2
Slang as you know has a way of expression, which can go several ways. Since Mames, I believe is slang for “suck,” correct me if incorrect, I thought when a guy tells another playing around or otherwise, “No Mames pinchi,” he’s like saying stop sucking up, equivalent of stop begging. I’ve been out of the loop for awhile, but vaguely, I don’t know why, but it seems to surface this way. Maybe someone else will chime in.

Not important, just a guess, I guess…

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esperanza
I think that, with slang this base, it’s best to take it to PM for further discussion. The phrase is not something you use in mixed company, and this forum is definitely mixed company.

https://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com

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Oscar2
Esperanza, your vigilance is recognized, and since it was just a matter of clarity being pursued, not meaning to offend anyone, I’d rather just forget the whole thing and move-on. Quit frankly I just don’t see it as that important.

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shoe
Esperanza and Oscar2;

I believe that the subject of this forum is Learning Spanish. I do not believe that much should be avoided especially if a expression is mentioned and not fully explained. Vulgar or not, a expression might be mentioned that is bad for some company but how does someone know if it is not explained fully on the forum?

PM is certainly not the way to try and teach a group of people that are Learning Spanish.

We are supposed to be adults and should be able to discuss almost anything.

I still have am not sure what the subject phrases mean and if or when I would/should use them or be offended by them.

 

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Oscar2

We are supposed to be adults and should be able to discuss almost anything.

I concur. However, when you have to get ensnarled in a moralistic, holier than thou bandwagon, it gets a bit much and fringes on a type of hypocrisy which polarizes, becomes negative and one just wants to distance themselves from it.

Your point is well made and yes, curiosity does play into this and we should handle it like knowing adults who have been around the block a time or two.

Mexican colloquialisms/slang if you will can be and many a times is bent on general situational circumstances and interpretation. For example, I couldn’t find the word “mame” in my Mexican dictionary. This morning I asked my Mexican gardener what are some ways the phrase No Mame is used and he said it’s situational. For example, one guy can say to another friend kiddingly, “No Mame’s pinché.”

The word pinche, according to the dictionary simply means, “I puncture.” The gardener said it means, “don’t kiss ass you jerk.” Now since Mame is supposed to be some derivative of suck, I guess that can also mean, “Stop sucking up you jerk.” Alternatively, can also mean, “Stop begging or don’t beg.” Sycophant and/or obsequious also seems like a close match.

Clarification should be simple, straightforward and un-embarrassing, if dealt with, as you mentioned, like mature adults and we’ve all been on this planet long enough to not find this surprising. Now, what my ears have heard from others in the course of time may be different for others but then again, isn’t it, such is life…

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Apr 29, 2008, 10:08 AM)

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esperanza
Geez louise, you guys. OK, here goes:

Mamar literally means ‘to suck’. However, a literal meaning and colloquial usage are two entirely different things.

Consider that una mamada is a blow job–to suck off. ‘No mames’ really has no literal translation. It definitely does not mean ‘to suck it up’. You could translate it to mean, ‘stop sucking me off’. Some namby-pamby dictionaries would say, ‘stop jerking me around’.

OSCAR: you wrote, “No mame’s pinché.” It should read, “No mames, pinche.” No apostrophe on mames, no accent mark on pinche.

This is DEFINITELY NOT something you would say to anyone in polite society. If I ever hear any of you say it, I will smack your knuckles with a ruler.

Everybody satisfied?

https://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com

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Oscar2
Why thank you Esperanza, that was illuminating and also a bit refreshing. Not only that, its my ol’Espe, kicking back into action and shooting from the hip ……. Laugh

One last question: since the dictionary with a hyphen on pinche (which I forgot how to put the hyphen on without going back to night school) means “I puncture” does the rough and tumble, John Wayne, Pancho Villa, Zapatas lexicon of disturbing words, also mean “jerk?” or there abouts?

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sioux4noff
OK, Aunt Esperanze, we will watch our mouths. Don’t want you coming after us with a bar of soap.
Thanks for the concise explanation. And rest assured I do not use those expressions.

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esperanza
At any rate, here in Mexico, pinche only means one thing. It’s pretty much the equivalent of “god damn”. Mi pinche suegra (my gd mother-in-law), la pinche CFE (the gd electric company).

Pinche is another word that you don’t say in polite society.

NOTE: I have been reminded that pinche also means lowest-rung-on-the-ladder kitchen assistant.

https://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com

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Rolly
My friends tell me pinche is roughly equivent to the non-sexual use of f**king. As is “Dónde estan mis pinche llavas.” or Pinche tránsito. etc. It ain’t polite.

Rolly Pirate

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esperanza
That too.

https://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com

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Oscar2

Quote
“Dónde estan mis pinche llavas.” or Pinche tránsito.

Yes, I’ve heard those expressions before and pinche can also be interpreted in the mamby-pamby dictionary as “damn.” Least we forget, not politically correct amongst polite company …….. enough I’m drowning! Laugh

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robrt8
No mames is being used much more the the younger generation, especially in the D.F. It’s not uncommon to hear it between male and female teens.
I say it in a joking way to guys who I’m VERY familiar with. One can also say no manches to play on mames.
It could mean any of the following and more:
You’ve got to be kidding.
Stop pulling my leg.
Stop messing with me.
No Way!

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tashby
¡Hijole!

Drunken, Sailor! Talk to us like a drunken Sailor!

 

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shoe
Thank you all for the better explanations. Now I might be able to understand when someone is insulting me and I can watch what I say.

“Mixed company” usage of words and actions like these is not necessary although I am at fault, from time to time, as much as the next person. Once I had a guy that worked for me complain about another guy who harassed a waitress while they were on a trip and he was embarrassed and upset about it. Both guys worked for me in a major company, so I had the waitress interviewed by a local manager in the town 2500 miles away. She remembered the incident and was not too happy about it as the guy had touched her inappropriately and used inappropriate language. I called the guy who had done it in and asked him his version. He just laughed it off and said it was nothing. I explained there had been a complaint, it was something and I lowered his level and pay so he could remember that not only are women to be respected but males too. This little incident only cost him $12,000 a year. It took him a three years to get back his level. He paid for the rest of his working life at that company as he could never recoup the money lost as raises were based on a percentage of base pay.

 

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1 thought on “The expression “no mames!”

  1. ‘No Mamés’ comes from ‘amantar’ which means to breastfeed. So when you say ‘no mames’ you are saying ‘don’t suckle’ which is why you don’t say it around women particularly. When you say ‘no manches’ literally it is ‘don’t stain’ but in Mexico many more innocent expressions are used with the same connotations as actually vulgar statements in other countries. Either phrase would be synonymous with ‘no jodas’ used in South America and Spain.

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