Pictures of Paricutin, Mexico

Adventure Tourism articles Travel & Destinations

originally – galleries/247 – with no article

Rick Meyer

Pictures of Paricutin Volcano, Mexico

Paricutin is a famous volcano that popped up in a farmer’s field in 1943 and continued to grow until 1952 to form a large cinder cone. Collateral flowing lava covered the valley and inundated adjacent villages of San Salvador and San Juan. The flow was slow enough so no one was hurt but a lot of property was destroyed. The trip to the summit of the volcano has become a popular daytrip from Uruapan.

The town that services this attraction way up on the main road is called Angahuan. This Purepecha village has a very different feel than other Mexican towns. Here horses are as numerous as cars. When I arrived shortly after 8 AM on a Saturday, women were sweeping the cobblestone streets with home-made stick brooms.

You can see Paricutin in the distance from the road as you arrive. Here is it below the skyline as you enter the Village of Angahuan. It is really a lot further away than it looks.
You can see Paricutin in the distance from the road as you arrive. Here is it below the skyline as you enter the Village of Angahuan. It is really a lot further away than it looks.
It is a relatively easy walk to the Templo San Juan partially buried by Paricutin (approx 50 feet of lava). I was surprised to find lots of people around the church. A tent restaurant is nearby where you can buy drinks and food. © Rick Meyer, 2001
It is a relatively easy walk to the Templo San Juan partially buried by Paricutin (approx 50 feet of lava). I was surprised to find lots of people around the church. A tent restaurant is nearby where you can buy drinks and food. © Rick Meyer, 2001
This is one of several lava ridges you have to scale before you get to the base of the cone. When I got to the cone, it was far too steep for me so I made the very difficult retreat.
This is one of several lava ridges you have to scale before you get to the base of the cone. When I got to the cone, it was far too steep for me so I made the very difficult retreat.

Published or Updated on: January 1, 2006 by Rick Meyer © 2006

Share This:
Tagged

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.