Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use

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robt65

Dec 25, 2010, 5:29 PM

Post #1 of 18 (38547 views)

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Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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I believe at one time I read on this forum, that in Mexico there are several different woods that are pretty termite resistant. I only remember mesquite, another is bamboo. I do not remember the others or what Mexican states they may be found. Can someone tell me what Mexican wood is favorable for interior doors, exterior doors, windows etc? What Mexican cities or states can I find shops that manufacture such products that are using termite resistant wood.

Thanks

robt65

(This post was edited by robt65 on Dec 25, 2010, 5:31 PM)

chinagringo

Dec 25, 2010, 6:44 PM

Post #2 of 18 (38534 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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I believe that I read somewhere on this forum or another that “Parota Wood” has some termite resistant properties. At the time that I read the post, I wasn’t familiar with that species and did some research. It does have a beautiful grain:
https://woodquestions.blogspot.com/…ssajara-designs.html
https://www.tassajaradesigns.com/…hp?prod=Parota_Slabs
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM

yucatandreamer

Dec 25, 2010, 7:38 PM

Post #3 of 18 (38530 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Here in Yucatan we use cedro.

skier14

Dec 26, 2010, 10:36 AM

Post #4 of 18 (38502 views)

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Re: [yucatandreamer] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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I have been looking for something like the cedar used in building hope chests and linning closets without success. I could use either sheets like triply or 3/4″ planks. Anybody have an idea where in Mexico one might find this wood. The Cedro I find is like 6×6 and I can not distinguish any odor.

rockydog85251

Dec 26, 2010, 11:42 AM

Post #5 of 18 (38495 views)

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Re: [skier14] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Here in Colima they use parrota, which has a beautiful grain & is a dark wood, termite resistant. In other parts it is also known as guanacaxtle.
Willie

chinagringo

Dec 26, 2010, 12:23 PM

Post #6 of 18 (38489 views)

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Re: [skier14] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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What you appear to be looking for is known as aromatic cedar. From WIKI:
“Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Red-cedar[2], Red Cedar, Eastern Juniper, Red Juniper, Pencil Cedar) is a species of juniper native to eastern North America, from southeastern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, east of the Great Plains.[3] Further west, it is replaced by the related Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain Juniper), and to the southwest, by Juniperus ashei (Ashe Juniper).[4][5][6] The Lakota Native American name is Chansha, “redwood” or Hante’. In its native range, it is commonly called “cedar” or “red cedar,” names rejected by the American Joint Committee on Horticultural Nomenclature [7] as it is a juniper, not a true cedar. However, “Red Cedar” is by far the most commonly used name.”
The cedar found in Mexico is typically called Spanish Cedar and is a prime choice for building humidors and guitar parts. In both of these applications, cedar odor isn’t desirable. Some articles:
https://www.acedar.org/…icles:The_Green_Gold
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedrela_odorata

I have seen where people have used Western Cedar in an application like lining a closet and then applied oil of cedar to give the aromatic factor.
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM

Kimpatsu Hekigan

Dec 26, 2010, 12:29 PM

Post #7 of 18 (38488 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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In southern Sonora, amapa wood has traditionally been used for vigas and posts because of its termite and rot resistance.

But these days, all amapas in Mexico are protected species (Tabebuia sp.), and the only amapa available is wood salvaged from old dwellings.

Supposedly, there are sustainable supplies of Tabebuia wood available from South America, called ipé wood. See this link:

Ipe Wood comes from the tree Tabebuia

The amapas are truly spectacular when they bloom in late January and February. You can see images at these links:

Tabebuia impetiginosa (pink)
Tabebuia chrysantha (yellow)

HTH,

— K.H.

The Disciple lamented, “Master! Why is my life beset with problems?!”
The Master observed, “Only tourists step in dog droppings…”

YucaLandia

Dec 28, 2010, 7:50 PM

Post #8 of 18 (38440 views)

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Re: [skier14] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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skier14,
The cedro (Cedrela odorata) of Yucatan, Mexico, and Central America is not cedar, and is not even a conifer, but instead it is a close cousin of Mahogany. Cedro is not related to European cedars (genus Cedrus), nor is it related to to American & Canadian cedars (genus-es like red cedar’s Juniperus, or “white cedar” Thuja (arborvitae) or “white cedar” Chamaecyparis (Cypress) – where the US & Canadian “cedars” are not actually cedars either).

Mexican Cedro would fit Robert’s needs (rot and termite resistant), but would not likely work for skier14’s intentions, because even though cedro’s heartwood can have a bit of cedar-like odor, it is only termite resistant and does not repel insects. Skier14 could consider using cedro heartwood to line his “cedar” chests, but then treat the cedro with actual cedar oil to give it the insect repelling odor of cedars, where cedro alone would not really protect clothes from insects.
steve

Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at https://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Dec 28, 2010, 9:42 PM)

Bennie García

Jan 4, 2011, 2:04 PM

Post #9 of 18 (38370 views)

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In Reply To
skier14,
The cedro (Cedrela odorata) of Yucatan, Mexico, and Central America is not cedar, and is not even a conifer, but instead it is a close cousin of Mahogany. Cedro is not related to European cedars (genus Cedrus), nor is it related to to American & Canadian cedars (genus-es like red cedar’s Juniperus, or “white cedar” Thuja (arborvitae) or “white cedar” Chamaecyparis (Cypress) – where the US & Canadian “cedars” are not actually cedars either).

Mexican Cedro would fit Robert’s needs (rot and termite resistant), but would not likely work for skier14’s intentions, because even though cedro’s heartwood can have a bit of cedar-like odor, it is only termite resistant and does not repel insects. Skier14 could consider using cedro heartwood to line his “cedar” chests, but then treat the cedro with actual cedar oil to give it the insect repelling odor of cedars, where cedro alone would not really protect clothes from insects.
steve

Cedro actually is a cedar but a different classification the than coniferous species. And the heartwood comes as close to termite proof as you will find in a low specific gravity, in other words, light and soft wood. It is an ideal wood for any interior millwork.

It also has plenty of the odor that is associated with the coniferous cedars. We are currently milling some in my shop and the air is filled with that distinctive smell.

Parota has several important qualities, the first being termite resistance. It is also attractive. But it is very soft and will dent and ding easily. It is also a very unstable wood prone to large amounts of swelling during the humid times of the year. Doors will stick shut, drawers won’t open etc. It also has a tendency to twist and warp. It is also highly acidic and steel fasteners will quickly deteriorate.

Other common woods you can find throughout the country that are decent cabinet woods are primavera and rosamorada.

There are also many other varieties including the exotics but I wouldn’t recommend them for architectural millwork and cabinets. TMany are just too hard and heavy and don’t hold glue well.

The above knowledge was accrued not through the U. of Google but through many years both in the lumber industry in this country and manufacturing wood products with the above mentioned species.

Bennie García

Jan 4, 2011, 3:36 PM

Post #10 of 18 (38355 views)

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Re: [Kimpatsu Hekigan] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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In Reply To
In southern Sonora, amapa wood has traditionally been used for vigas and posts because of its termite and rot resistance.

But these days, all amapas in Mexico are protected species (Tabebuia sp.), and the only amapa available is wood salvaged from old dwellings.

Supposedly, there are sustainable supplies of Tabebuia wood available from South America, called ipé wood. See this link:

Ipe Wood comes from the tree Tabebuia

The amapas are truly spectacular when they bloom in late January and February. You can see images at these links:

Tabebuia impetiginosa (pink)
Tabebuia chrysantha (yellow)

HTH,

— K.H.

The trees with the beautiful yellow flowers are commonly known as primavera and they are most definitely not a protected species. The lumber from these trees is not typically used for exterior purposes. It is as different as night and day from Ipe.

bournemouth

Jan 4, 2011, 6:33 PM

Post #11 of 18 (38347 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Sonoran Amapas have the most beautiful pink blossoms – these trees are protected and while similar to Primavera trees, I don’t think they are the same.

Bennie García

Jan 4, 2011, 8:01 PM

Post #12 of 18 (38341 views)

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Sonoran Amapas have the most beautiful pink blossoms – these trees are protected and while similar to Primavera trees, I don’t think they are the same.

The ones with the pink flowers are called rosamorada in many parts of the country. I think the true species is tabebuia rosea. Again they are completely different from ipe. Common names for different trees and their woods can vary greatly between regions.

Wood from both trees are commercially available throughout the country.

robt65

Apr 13, 2013, 11:25 AM

Post #13 of 18 (34590 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Bennie,

Is there a wood available in Mexico that would actually “repel” insects and yet still be a wood that would be able to be used for an exterior door without a high percentage of warping? What would you suggest? We still have four other exterior doors to have made.

Thanks,
Robert

yucatandreamer

Apr 13, 2013, 12:16 PM

Post #14 of 18 (34581 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Cedro
I have beautiful doors from this wood.

Bennie García

Apr 14, 2013, 4:05 PM

Post #15 of 18 (34543 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Cedro or parota. Good old growth cedro is getting scarce and expensive but would be my first choice. Parota will do but make sure it is very dry in order to limit movement.

robt65

Apr 14, 2013, 4:39 PM

Post #16 of 18 (34538 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Hey Bennie,

What about this Brazilian Walnut Wood, it is named “Ipe”? apparently it has some pretty good properties. I think I am going to fish around and see if it is available here, somewhere in Mexico and if not how much it would cost me to import it from the USA or Brazil. https://tinytimbers.com/specie_brwalnut.htm

Have you ever heard of or ever worked with this species? Do you know where I might look in Mexico to get some 2 inch thick stock?

Thanks,
Robt65

Bennie García

Apr 15, 2013, 7:00 PM

Post #17 of 18 (34502 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Ipe is available here. More than likely in 4/4 stock. But you are going to a lot of unnecessary trouble. Find some top quality kiln dried Spanish Cedar. You’ll pay about 50 pesos a board foot for it. It makes great doors.

edparker

May 3, 2013, 2:04 AM

Post #18 of 18 (34164 views)

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Re: [robt65] Termite Resistant Wood for Home Construction Use.
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Have you ever tried using alkali resistant fiberglass mesh, if this added on your walls, it can prevent termites from destroying any internal woods.

(This post was edited by edparker on May 3, 2013, 2:05 AM)

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