Footprints in San Pedro Itzican

As a home-based working mother I recently found myself faced with an annual quandary: how to keep my two restless pre-teens entertained over their summer holiday and simultaneously squeeze some quality time into an already busy agenda. Inspiration came from a handsome coffee table book entitled Espacios del Lago de Chapala * (see note below) featuring dozens of […]

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In the parish church of San Andres

The graceful 18th century Parroquia de San Andrés, is not only Ajijic’s chief landmark, but also the hub around which village life revolves. It is the focal point for those important milestones that bind the close-knit Mexican family: baptisms, first communions, confirmations, weddings and funerals. Poised in its multi-tiered campanario are the four bells that mark the […]

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Charreria

Charreria

Horse lovers (and anyone else looking for a dose of authentic Mexico) will find September is the perfect month to take in the best of the country’s national equestrian sport — la charrería. It’s especially true for those who find themselves in the general vicinity of Guadalajara. As September gets under way, the city’s 12th annual […]

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In the country pueblos near Oaxaca city, you'll find Day of the Dead means socializing among families, many of them related, all certainly neighbors and friends.

Day of the Dead (Día de los Muertos) in Chapala

Mexico’s most intriguing holiday, is linked to a rich variety of popular customs that offer resident expatriates an excellent opportunity to soak in the culture of their adopted home. Here are some suggestions and tips for embracing and enjoying this distinctive celebration. Take a tour of ofrenda displays: Public exhibitions of Day of the Dead altars have […]

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My life as an escaramuza mom

My Life As An Escaramuza Mom

In this day and age, dedicated parents willingly support any type of sporting activity that draws the interest of our off-spring. The average mother of today assumes a host of collateral tasks that go with the territory–handling transportation logistics, cheering from the stands, cajoling during training slumps, rejoicing in victories, consoling in moments of defeat. […]

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Luz: Another village light in Mata Ortiz, Mexico

Juan Mata Ortíz is a small village of potters, farmers and cowboys in Northern Chihuahua. About 30 years ago, an unschooled artistic genius, Juan Quezada, taught himself how to make ollas, earthenware jars, by a method used hundreds of years ago by the prehistoric inhabitants. Now, his works are known worldwide and over 300 men, women and […]

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The Guaymas Chronicles: La Mandadera by David E. Stuart

Cogan’s Reviews Although it’s about Mexico, this one starts off in Ecuador in the 1960s where the author was doing doctoral fieldwork for a dissertation on haciendas in that country. His work took him to a remote research station on the side of a mountain seventy miles from electricity, running water, telephones, etc. One day […]

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Living in Timucuy, Yucatan © John G. Gladstein, 2008

Living in Timucuy, Yucatan: birth, death and some in-between

The Setting Curanderismo The Inhabitants The Physical and Psychological Compadrazco The Beginning Love Is In the Air “I Do” The End of the Game Works Cited The majority of people who visit the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico will visit Cancún, Cozumel or Mérida. All these places have an established tourist infrastructure, are modern and contain […]

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