Puebla

Regions and States

Puebla crestThe state of Puebla is part of the Central Highlands Region of Mexico, along with the states of Guanajuato, Hidalgo, Mexico (State of), Mexico City, Morelos, Querétaro and Tlaxcala.

Though small in land area, Puebla is very diverse. The topography is rugged and elevations range from under 100 meters to three massive volcanoes rising over 5,000 meters above sea level:  Orizaba (5,636m) to the east and Popocatepetl (5,410m) and Iztaccihuatl (5,230m) to the west.

Puebla also has significant social and ethnic diversity. The city of Puebla (the state capital) is the heart of a Metropolitan Area which extends across state lines to the city of Tlaxcala. Metropolitan Puebla-Tlaxcala is the country’s 4th largest urban area with a population over 3.1 million. Puebla is an important industrial state, home to plants producing metals, chemicals, electronics, textiles and  motor vehicles.

The state’s historical importance is evidenced by numerous archaeological sites. The state has been the site of several important military confrontations, including the massacre of Cholula (1519), American General Winfield Scott’s occupation (1845-48), and, most famous of all, the “Cinco de Mayo” (May 5th) battle of Puebla in 1862 at which Mexican forces defeated the French.

Here are select articles and recipes related to Puebla:

 

Fried cutlet torta: Torta de milanesa

While a torta can be filled with any kind of savory sandwich filling, the beans, avocado and tomato are always present. Leave out the onion if you are not a fan, or substitute mayonnaise for the crema; some torterías use melted butter instead of crema. The milanesa is probably the most popular filling, and part of its appeal is the crunch of […]

0 comments

Grilled marinated chicken breasts: Pollo atlixquense

“Melting pot” cooking has given rise to innumerable ethnic grocery stores in the United States, and for people who enjoy cooking authentic Mexican food, this means that ingredients are easily available. Dried avocado leaves, essential to several Mixteca recipes, are sold in just about any Mexican grocery store. These are from the native Mexican avocado, Peresea […]

0 comments

Puebla style sandwiches: Cemitas

A few years ago, I had a call from Rachel Wharton, a writer for the New York Daily News food section. She was writing an article on cemitas, the latest sandwich craze to hit New York at the time, thanks to the many immigrants from Puebla who have contributed enormously to the wonderful street food culture of my home […]

0 comments

Mushrooms in vinaigrette: Hongos en escabeche

Wild mushrooms are found in abundance in the states of Puebla, Tlaxcala and Estado de Mexico during and after the rainy season, and used in soups, quesadillas and vegetable dishes. Although the comadre used escobetas (coral mushrooms) the following recipe may be successfully prepared using fresh cultivated mushrooms. Ingredients 2 pounds fresh mushrooms (if using button mushrooms, […]

0 comments
"Pepper Pail" By Linda Paul

The comadre and her sixteen children, or how I started cooking Mexican food

I first met the comadre through a colleague of mine at the University of Puebla, Mexico. I was in the habit of bringing meat loaf, mashed potatoes, and other “gringo food” that the professor’s elderly American father missed, to his house in Cholula, the small town where we both lived, and where the comadre worked as his housekeeper. She […]

0 comments

Mexican trout with sesame seeds in parchment paper: Trucha empapelada con ajonjoli

The Mexican trout farms in the mountains outside Atlixco have open air restaurants that are crowded with families getting out of the city on weekends. The menus feature trucha empapelada, or en papillote, with a variety of seasonings. This version of Mexican trout with sesame seeds in parchment paper is delicious and unusual. Ingredients 4 whole small […]

0 comments

Kebe Cruda

No había comido carne cruda desde que vivía en Nueva York. No me gustaba la carne tártara que mi padre ordenaba. Pero recientemente probé este platillo de Puebla. La adición de semillas de chile frescas le da otra dimensión de sabor, y el jalapeño picado, cebolla y hierbabuena lo hacen aún mejor. Asegúrese de usar […]

0 comments

Mexican-Lebanese Lamb Tartare: Kebe Cruda

I had not eaten raw meat since I was growing up in New York, saying “yuck” to my father’s order of steak tartare, until I tried this dish in Puebla recently. The addition of fresh chile seeds gives it a whole other dimension of flavor, and the chopped jalapeños, onions and mint take it over […]

0 comments

Kebe Charola

En esta receta, la cazuela en la que se hornea el kebe es poco profunda como una charola. El platillo es similar a un rollo de carne hecho de carne de cordero. Su capa exterior forma una corteza para sostener el relleno de carne y piñones. También se sirve con jocoque, para el cual un […]

0 comments

Mole Poblano de Guajolote

Existen probablemente tantas recetas para este platillo como lo hay cocineras en Puebla, donde es indispensable en las fiestas de boda. Durante el festival del mole poblano en Puebla, el cual se celebra por tres días consecutivos en julio, las recetas del mole poblano y las tradicionales mesas poblanas son calificadas. Ingredientes Para el pavo: […]

0 comments

A yearly culinary ritual: La matanza

Beginning in mid-October, and lasting for a month, a five-hundred-year-old ritual encompassing history, tradition and cuisine takes place in the valley of Tehuacan, in the Mixteca Poblana region of southern Puebla. Traveling through this rocky, hardscrabble land, one wonders how the inhabitants have sustained themselves for thousands of years and marvels at the fact that […]

0 comments

Mexican chicken and allspice stew: Chilpozontle

A specialty of the Puebla mountain town of Zacapoaxtla, this Mexican dish uses allspice leaves as well as berries in a savory chicken stew. If you can’t get allspice leaves, fresh bay leaves work well. In fact, allspice leaves are sometimes called “Jamaican bay leaves.” Ingredients 1 chicken, cut into serving pieces 1medium onion, cut […]

0 comments
This colorful alabrije rabbit by Jacobo Angeles races across the Mexican mountain meadows. © Alvin Starkman, 2008

Mexican-style rabbit in red pipian with wild mushrooms: Pipian rojo con conejo y hongos silvestres

I taught this in a cooking class I gave last summer in Cuetzalan, Puebla, where I tried to incorporate two of the area’s signature ingredients, allspice and wild mushrooms, with rabbit, commonly eaten in Central Mexico since pre-Hispanic times. This Mexican-style dish combines the meat with wild mushrooms and a red pipian sauce based on […]

0 comments

Baked Kibbeh: Kebe Charola

Charola is the Spanish word for a tray or, in this case, the pan in which the kibbeh is baked. It is something like a meat loaf made with lamb, with the outer layers forming a crust to hold the meat and pine nut filling. It is always served with jocoque, for which a thick, natural yogurt is […]

0 comments

Stewed pork with chipotle on tostadas: Tinga poblana

Tinga is a basically a stewed pork dish, cooked with a chipotle sauce and most commonly served on tostadas. A chipotle is a dried jalapeño with a wonderful, smokey flavor. The chipotles called for in this recipe, called chipotles adobados are canned and can be found anywhere from Michoacan to Michigan. This is a good dish to make ahead and then provide garnishes to […]

0 comments
The native Mexican avocado, Peresea drymifolia © Daniel Wheeler, 2009

Culinary travel in the Mixteca Poblana: The avocado route

Traveling through the Sierra Mixteca, which we have done many times on our drives from Puebla to Oaxaca, I am always reminded of the story of “stone soup:” a meal is prepared starting with just a stone in a pot of water, which becomes a tasty supper after all the people of a village have […]

0 comments

Lasagna with Poblano Chiles In Cream: Lasagna con Rajas de Chile Poblano

We first saw this in a restaurant in Chipilo. If you like lasagna with white sauces, this one is a delicious change from the usual. The filling is the very Pueblan rajas con crema, poblano chile strips in cream, in this case thickened to form a béchamel sauce. If you use the no-boil lasagna noodles, a good […]

0 comments

Goat and vegetable mole: Mole de caderas

Every year pamphlets explaining the origins of this dish, along with a list of ingredients, are distributed in Tehuacan’s restaurants by the city’s Gastronomic Council, an association of restaurant owners formed to promote local cuisine. If you live in a place where goat meat is available, this is worth trying. The proportions come from La Cocina […]

0 comments

Sweet Potato Pudding: Budín de Camote

I first tasted this dish several years ago, prepared by Doña Gloria of the Hotel Bar Reforma in Cholula. It was the first time I had seen the purple-fleshed variety of sweet potatoes other than in their raw state in the market. It made for a dramatically colorful presentation, although it is just as good […]

0 comments

Puebla style eggnog: Rompope

This beverage was first made by the colonial-era nuns at the Convent of Santa Clara in Puebla, and the Santa Clara brand is still one of the most popular. It is fun and very easy to make at home. Unlike north-of-the-border eggnog, rompope already contains alcohol, although in a small proportion, so it does not […]

0 comments

Fish in red pipian: Pescado en pipian rojo

The mountains of northern Puebla and Veracruz are blessed with an abundance of freshwater fish. The combination of fish and pipian is unusual but delicious, and any firm fleshed white fish can be used in this recipe. Use more or less chile seeds, according to taste. Ingredients For the fish: 2 quarts water 2 pounds firm white […]

0 comments
Elote © Daniel Wheeler, 2009

Fresh corn pozole from southern Puebla: Elopozole de Tierra Caliente

In the northern and central parts of the state, southern Puebla is called ” tierra caliente” — hot land — although it can get chilly in winter, especially in the mountains. Most pozole is made with hominy-like corn kernels that have been dried then soaked, but this one is made with fresh corn, called elote, thus giving rise […]

0 comments

Stuffed Grape Leaves: Tacos de Parra

In Puebla, these are most often served as small, finger-size rolls, in which case they are referred to as taquitos. Grape leaves usually come in a jar, packed in brine, and must be thoroughly rinsed before cooking. Cabbage leaves are sometimes used instead of grape leaves, making tacos de col. Ground beef may be substituted for the lamb. Ingredients: […]

0 comments

A Meal in a Sandwich: Tortas, Cemitas, Pambazos

For months after we moved to Mexico several years ago, my favorite place to eat here in Cholula was a hole-in-the-wall tortería called Tortas Alex. Although a Mexican torta goes far beyond what is normally described as a sandwich – it was something delicious, satisfying and comforting when we needed it most. This was long before tortas […]

0 comments

Puebla-style turkey in mole: Mole poblano de guajolote

There are probably as many recipes for turkey in mole as there are cooks in Puebla, where it is indispensable at wedding fiestas. During Puebla’s Festival de Mole Poblano, which is held for three consecutive Sundays in July, mole poblano recipes and traditional poblano table settings are judged. Ingredients For the turkey: 1 8-pound turkey or 2 large chickens, cut in serving […]

0 comments

Caldo de habas vegetariano

Aunque las habas frescas solo aparecen en los mercados del centro de México durante la primavera, la versión seca está disponible todo el año y se cuece en menos tiempo que otros frijoles secos. Publiqué una receta para sopa de habas al estilo de Puebla en la edición de noviembre del 2003 de México Connect, […]

0 comments
Apples and Eggs © Daniel Wheeler, 2009

Sauteed apples and eggs: Huevos zacatlantecos

After the Virgen de la Asuncion has been raised up from her bed of apples, a little bit every hour throughout the night, the faithful make their way home in the wee hours with bags of apples from her bed. This apple and egg dish is a traditional breakfast at this time of year. Ingredients […]

0 comments

Stuffed Nopales: Huaraches

These were first served to us at the nopal fair in Tlaxcalancingo, Puebla. I have since had them in restaurants in Mexico City. They are aptly named for the flat soles of the country people’s sandals that they resemble. Ingredients: 6 large nopal cactus paddles, cleaned 1/4 medium white onion 1 large garlic clove, peeled […]

0 comments

Immigrant Cooking In Mexico – Part Two: The Italians of Chipilo

The previous column on immigrant cooking in Mexico dealt with the Mennonites of Chihuahua, a group that brought Northern and Eastern European culinary traditions to their new country. A far different cuisine came with the Italians, who largely migrated during the Porfiriato, in the last part of the 19th century. The great wave of migration from Europe during the […]

0 comments

Immigrant Cooking in Mexico Part 3: The Lebanese of Puebla

From Cholula to Chicago, taco lovers everywhere know that any taqueria that calls itself poblana, or “from Puebla,” will have tacos arabes on the menu. But not everyone knows that this regional specialty of meat roasted on a vertical spit and served in the thick, pita bread-like wheat tortilla called pan arabe is a prime example of the Mexican- Lebanese culinary fusion that […]

0 comments
Danza de los Voladores © Tony Burton

Mexico’s Danza de los Voladores – a photo-essay

One of the most spectacular dances in the country — la Danza de Los Voladores, literally the Dance of the Flyers — involves only five participants.In the old days, they first had to find a suitable tree, as far away from women as possible, and then beg its pardon prior to chopping it down (see […]

0 comments

Mexican chicken and fruit stew: Manchamanteles

Literally meaning “tablecloth stainers”, because of its deep red sauce, manchamanteles can be made with chicken, pork, or a combination of the two. In Puebla, where it originated, the fruit that is used varies from season to season and family to family, but plantains and pineapples are always included. Ingredients For the chicken: 2 chickens, cut into […]

0 comments
There's a skirmish at every intersection for the annual Cinco de Mayo parade in Mexico City. Costumed residents reenact scenes from the Battle of Puebla, and smoke in the air comes from simulated musket fire. © Donald W. Miles, 2009

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating?

There are Mexicans these days who have never attended a Cinco de Mayo celebration. The holiday has taken a back seat to the many saints’ days and other festivals. The growth of celebrations in the United States was initially triggered by a lawsuit from LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens, several decades ago, […]

0 comments

On the road to becoming an authentic “poblano”

Located 60 km southeast of Mexico City ­ about an hour and a half drive up a winding, but well-paved, highway from the international airport ­ in the State of Puebla, Mexico is a town that more than time has forgotten. As someone who has spent the past twenty years in the travel business, I […]

0 comments

Spiced Lamb Steamed in Maguey Leaves: Mixiotes de Carnero

Mixiotes de carnero are a specialty of the central Mexican states of Puebla, Tlaxcala and Hidalgo. They are flavored with two of the most distinctively Mexican of leaves: avocado leaves, which are enclosed with the meat, and pencas de maguey – the inner layer of maguey leaves – used to wrap the meat. Mixiote wrappers- papel para mixiotes – may be used to wrap […]

0 comments

Chicken in Peanut Sauce: Pollo Encacahuatado

Moles and other thick sauces made with nuts and seeds go best with chicken and pork. This recipe is from the town of Huauchinango, Puebla, set in a cloud forest not far from the Puebla-Veracruz border. It is a specialty of the small family restaurants in the area. Ingredients: 1 whole chicken, cut into serving […]

0 comments

Candied walnuts: Nueces garapiñadas

Candied nuts are a favorite treat in Mexico, and may be made with walnuts, pecans, almonds or peanuts. Walnuts are most prevalent during the winter holiday season. This sweet is one of the things we can’t resist while walking around Cholula’s December fair, with its booths of candy, ornaments, and decorations of every description. Ingredients […]

0 comments

Mexico’s wild mushrooms, gifts of the rainy season: Huitlacoche

Although rainy weather is an unpleasant thought, if not anathema, to those hoping for a little summer vacation sun-and-fun, the rainy season is one of my favorite times of the year here in central Mexico. Perhaps this is because there is such a long dry spell that by the time the rains come, they are […]

0 comments
Macadamia nuts are a popular and delicious Mexican cash crop © Daniel Wheeler 2010

Mexican macadamia nuts: culinary gold

A recent trip to the cloud covered village of Cuetzalan, high in the Sierra of Puebla, generated more of the questions that arise on each visit. How does the regional dress of pure white cotton, worn daily, stay so clean in a place where it rains nearly every day? How do any vehicles get to […]

0 comments

Cholula: Traveling the Central High Plains of Mexico

On a huge hill, covered with weeds, small trees and debris, was built a church overlooking the city, the Sanctuary de los Remedies. It is a beautiful site, with the towered church silhouetted against the blue sky and the snow-capped peaks of Popocatepetl and Ixtaccihuatl in the background. It was discovered that this was not […]

0 comments
Cinco de Mayo stamp

Cinco de Mayo is more widely celebrated in USA than Mexico

Of the many battles fought on Mexican soil in the nineteenth century, only one — the Battle of Puebla, fought on May 5, 1862 — has given rise to a Mexican national holiday. Why this one? The main reason is that the Battle of Puebla marks Mexico’s only major military success since independence from Spain […]

0 comments
Known as pimienta gorda, allspice is grown in Puebla, Mexico © Daniel Wheeler, 2011

Fragrant, flavorful allspice: An essential Mexican seasoning

Recently, when a friend here in Cholula went up to Cuetzalan, in the Sierra of Puebla, I asked him to bring back some allspice, which proliferates there on evergreen trees that produce fat, fragrant berries. An indispensable ingredient in several adobos (the seasoning pastes used on meat, fish and fowl) and on many regional pipians (the seed-based […]

0 comments

Mexicasa: The Enchanting Inns and Haciendas of Mexico by Gina Hyams and Melba Levick

Cogan’s Reviews I’ve been heard a couple of times lately saying out loud: “What an absolutely amazing country this is!” We were in Patzcuaro a short time ago one Sunday morning when the town’s market was in full swing. An incredible variety of goods were on display. And with all that colorful activity around us, […]

0 comments
"Apples piled in a "monton" © Daniel Wheeler, 2009

September in the Mexican sierra: an abundance of apples

Although there is a tendency to think of Mexican fruit in terms of tropical varieties like mango and guava, apples do well in the higher elevations of Mexico, and are valued for their flavor, shelf life, and nutritional properties. The journey of apples to Mexico was part of the long relationship between apples and humans, […]

0 comments
View of the Cathedral in the city of Puebla © Rick Meyer, 1996

City of Ideas keeps overlooking me

Great intellectuals of the world have been talking for seven years about making things better. You can see how that has turned out. They assemble each November in Mexico, in Pubela, to empower a large paying audience and others with innovative ideas in science, technology, art, design, politics, education, culture, business, entertainment and other areas […]

0 comments

In a God’s Eye

In a God’s Eye By Elizabeth Kelly www.createspace.com, 2011 Available from Amazon Books: Paperback This book begins well but it does not end well. Our protagonist, now living in Cholula — “the oldest living city in the western world” — is a kindly old lady named Gina. She is a “good deal older” than her circle […]

0 comments
Honey, Puebla

Did you know? A village named “Honey”

Believe it or not, there is a village in Mexico with the unlikely name of Honey. Honey. This hardly sounds like a Mexican word and certainly lacks any Nahuatl or Spanish roots. Yet, in the state of Puebla there is a small village named Honey. I admit that when I first heard of the village, […]

0 comments
The world's smallest volcano

Did you know? The world’s smallest volcano is in Puebla, Mexico

The Cuexcomate volcano, in a suburb of the city of Puebla, is generally considered to be the world’s smallest volcano. Weighing in at an estimated 40 metric tons, it stands just 13 meters (43 feet) tall, with a reach (diameter) of 23 meters (75 feet). The name Cuexcomate derives from the Nahuatl Cuexcomac which means […]

0 comments
mountaineering expedition on Pico de Orizaba

Mexico mountaineering expedition on Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltepetl)

“The mountain, she is not innocent….” Senor Reyes’ voice trailed off as his words hung in the dry air of the climber’s hostel in Tlachichuca. John and I toned down our giddy anticipation and shifted uncomfortably in the sudden gravity of the moment. Reyes was perfect, exactly the type of mountain man you expected to […]

0 comments
Amate painted by Gerardo Mendoza

Did You Know? Most “bark paper” comes from wild fig trees

Besides being used as a kind of rough paper for records and correspondence, amate was also cut into human or animal forms as part of witchcraft rituals after which it would be buried in front of the person’s house or animal enclosure. Colorful paintings on papel amate or bark paper are sold throughout central Mexico, virtually anywhere […]

0 comments
Join us to experience the other Mexico and the roads our ancestors traveled.

The Pre-Hispanic, The Colonial, The Royal Roads Of Morelos And Puebla

Step by step, all roads are formed by those who walk them. The roads of Mexico were first formed by native people walking from city to city. These roads – some paved – were used for conducting warfare, cultural interchange, and commerce. Later these same roads were trod by the heavy horses of the conquering […]

0 comments

Nopales Rellenos

Ingredientes: 12 nopales tiernos 6 rebanadas de queso manchego o panela 1/4 de cebolla en trozo 1 diente de ajo sal al gusto 1/2 taza de harina 4 claras 4 yemas 1 1/2 taza de aceite Preparación: Se cuecen los nopales en 3 tazas de agua con el ajo, la cebolla y la sal. Se […]

0 comments

Trucha Empapelada con Ajonjolí

Las granjas de trucha en las montañas de las afueras de Atlixco tienen restaurantes al aire libre que se llenan de familias que salen de la ciudad por el fin de semana. Los menús incluyen trucha empanzada o en papillote, con una variedad de sazones. Ésta versión es deliciosa e inusual. Ingredientes 4 truchas enteras, […]

0 comments

Pescado en Pipián Rojo

Las montañas del norte de Puebla y Veracruz están bendecidas con abundantes pescados de agua dulce. La combinacion de pescado y pipián es poco común pero muy deliciosa, y cualquier pescado blanco de carne firme puede ser utilizado para esta receta. La cantidad de semillas de chile va de acuerdo con su gusto individual. Ingredientes […]

0 comments

Tacos de Parra

En Puebla, estos se sirven como pequeños rollos del tamaño de un dedo, y se les llaman taquitos. Las hojas de uva por lo general vienen en un frasco, empacadas en salmuera, y deben ser bien enjuagadas antes de cocinar con ellas. Las hojas de col se pueden utilizar en vez de hojas de uva, […]

0 comments

Nueces garapiñadas

Las nueces acarameladas son un favorito en México, y pueden ser hechos con nueces, pacanas, almendras o cacahuates. Las nueces son más abundantes en el invierno. Nosotros siempre los compramos en la feria de diciembre en Cholula, donde venden dulces, ornamentos y artículos decorativos de todo tipo para navidad. Ingredientes 2 tazas de nueces 1 […]

0 comments

La Cocina De Inmigrantes En México: Los Libaneses En Puebla

De Cholula a Chicago, los entusiasta de tacos en todas partes saben que cualquier taquería que se llama “poblana,” tendrá tacos árabes en el menú. Éstos consisten en carne asada en un asador vertical, servida en una tortilla gruesa similar al pan pita que se llama pan árabe. Es un claro ejemplo de la fusión […]

0 comments
© Daniel Wheeler, 2009

Puebla style apple and blueberry marmalade: Mermelada de manzana y mora azul

This is a classic apple and blueberry marmalade recipe from the Sierra Norte, adapted from Patricia Quintana’s Cocina de los Angeles. Blueberries are nearly as abundant as apples in the Sierra of Puebla, and the two make a wonderful combination. Ingredients 3 pounds blueberries 2 pounds apples, peeled and grated Sugar as necessary 2 2-inch pieces […]

0 comments
Don't mess with me! A 6-year-old girl with musket is dressed to celebrate el Cinco de Mayo in Mexico City. © Donald W. Miles, 2009

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating?

It’s easy to enjoy a Cinco de Mayo celebration. Many of the festivities in the U.S. have grown so that now they are generally larger than those in Mexico. Half a million people show up for the annual event in Los Angeles alone. In Mexico, there are parades and parties in places like Puebla and Mexico […]

0 comments
Talavera (Santa Catarina Workshop)

Talavera – Mexico’s earthly legacy from the City Of Angels

There is no more glorious an experience or heightening of the senses than to walk through Puebla’s exquisitely beautiful downtown on a sun drenched afternoon. Every building is a work of art. And everywhere, there are gorgeous tiles, dating back hundreds of years and looking as though they were made yesterday. They adorn the facades […]

0 comments

The cuisine of Puebla, cradle of corn

The creative blending of diverse ingredients is the hallmark of Mexican cooking, and in the state of Puebla it is a passion. Everywhere there is talk of food. People give detailed accounts of what they’ve just eaten, plan to eat later, or what was served at the most recent fiesta. Their enthusiasm for the subject is […]

0 comments

Mexican chicken in yogurt sauce: Enjococado

The name of this dish is derived from the Spanish word jocoque, which is sometimes translated as buttermilk, but is really a type of thick yogurt of Middle Eastern origin. In the city of Puebla, with its large Lebanese population, jocoque is sold in most supermarkets, but in rural areas it is homemade and truly delicious. If you can’t […]

0 comments
A clay casserole of mole for a Oaxaca feast © Alvin Starkman, 2007

Demystifying mole, Mexico’s national dish

Although Cinco de Mayo, the national May 5th holiday commemorating the 1862 Battle of Puebla, is celebrated with much more fervor by Mexicans living in the United States than in Mexico, one exception is the state of Puebla, and especially the city of Puebla itself. Here — in the colonial city where mole poblana originated — […]

0 comments
Puebla's Quetzal Dance is one of the one of the most colorful folkloric dances in Mexico. © Tony Burton, 2004

Did You Know? Quetzal Dancers in Puebla, Mexico

The Quetzal Dance is one of the most colorful folkloric dances anywhere in the country. It is also thought to be one of the most ancient. Both the dance and the spectacular headdresses worn by those taking part are thought to pre-date the Conquest, perhaps by hundreds of years. The headdresses represent the extravagant colors […]

0 comments
Scenes of the Parian district are the first you may see of Puebla near Palafox y Mendoza and 5 de Mayo on the walk to the zocalo.

South from Puebla, Mexico

From Cholula we are in the city of Puebla in a matter of minutes. Though Puebla is a city of maybe 1.5 million people, it is not a city of tall buildings of steel and glass. The old part of town surrounds the main plaza or ‘zocalo’. The plaza is dominated by a magnificent Cathedral and buildings […]

0 comments
The impressive Palacio del Ayunamiento (city hall) anchors and occupies most the block north of the zocalo. There is a hotel and McDonalds on the west end of the block.

Pictures of Puebla, Mexico

Puebla is an industrial city of the first order. Though the downtown architecture is virtually exclusively colonial style, you still have the feel that you are in canyons of buildings due to their proximity. The zocalo is the heart pumping with activity, often demonstrations, since this is also the state capital. On your route to the […]

0 comments
Hacienda of San Antonio Chautla Reproduced with permission from www.amatzcalli.com

Did you know? The first Archbishop of Oaxaca: a miraculous birth and re-birth

In 1887, Eulogio Gregorio Clemente Gillow y Zavalza (1841-1922) was appointed Bishop of Antequera (Oaxaca). Four years later, he became the first Archbishop of Antequera. Named after a town in Spain, Antequera is the Catholic archdiocese of Mexico which includes the city of Oaxaca. Archbishop Gillow had a somewhat curious background. He was the only […]

0 comments

La Ceiba, Puebla: Efrain, artist curandero and friend

La Ceiba is a small town in the state of Puebla on the highway between Mexico City and Poza Rica, Veracruz. It’s about 45 minutes from Poza Rica. The town was named after a large ceiba tree that once grew in the plaza. The name of the town has actually been changed to that of […]

0 comments

La Ceiba in Puebla

Dateline – La Ceiba, Puebla, Mexico May 1, 1998 La Ceiba is a small town in the state of Puebla on the highway between Mexico City and Poza Rica, Veracruz. It’s about 45 minutes from Poza Rica. The town was named after a large ceiba tree that once grew in the plaza. The name of […]

0 comments

San Francisco Ixtacamaxtitlan: The conquistadors in Mexico

Dateline-San Francisco Ixtacamaxtitlan September 29, l998 Part I In February 1519 Hernan Cortez and his small army of adventurers set sail from Cuba on one of the most epic military adventures in the history of our world. Unfortunately, the history of Mexico has since been tarnished by plunder, corruption, and greed. The following quotes refer […]

0 comments
Map of Puebla

Map of Puebla

Map of Puebla Map of Puebla SCT, 1999.

0 comments

Puebla: traveling the Central High Plains of Mexico

In my original booklet on traveling the Central High Plains, we traveled to Poza Rica by way of Xicotepec and La Ceiba, one of the principal routes between Mexico City and Poza Rica. Since I have used some of the material in other articles, we will take a different return route and visit some of […]

0 comments

TAGS – States, Regions, Cities

Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Campeche, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Colima, Durango, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, México (State of), México City, D.F., Michoacán, Morelos, Nayarit, Nuevo León, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosí, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz, Yucatán, Zacatecas,

0 comments

Burying Eula – A Day Of The Dead Story

Eula died during the rainy season, when the earth is soft and moist and a grave is easy to dig. Esperanza said that the damp weather was hard on the ancianos, and indeed, in those months, many a house in town bore over its gate the black ribbon which in central Mexico signifies a death in the […]

0 comments

Landscapes Of Mexico, Landscapes Of The Self

Mexico is a land of contrasts; I see this in both of my workplaces. Graffitied walls and worn picket fences; towering store signs and grazing cows; littered highways and rolling green hills – all of these images equally contradictory and impossible to imagine side by side. Yet, somehow these scenes are all strung together by […]

0 comments
A member of Maseual Siuat Xochitajkitinij grinds corn by hand to make tortillas. She uses a traditional mano and metate.

Yohualichan, Puebla: A small town, but a mighty force in Cultural Conservation

Yohualichan is one of those places that, if you blink, you might miss it. Situated toward the end of a meandering cobbled road in the midst of the Sierra Norte Mountains of Puebla, the entrance to the town’s road and archaeological site is marked by a single blue sign around a curve in a one-lane […]

0 comments
A member of Maseual Siuat Xochitajkitinij grinds corn by hand to make tortillas. She uses a traditional mano and metate.

Yohualichan, Puebla

Maseual Siuat Xochitajkitinij, or “Indigenous Women, Weavers of Flower,” works toward the revalorization and cultural conservation of traditional handicrafts. It is also promoting equity between men and women in the workplace. Yohualichan is one of those places that, if you blink, you might miss it. Situated toward the end of a meandering cobbled road in […]

0 comments

Anchos encurtidos: Sweet and Hot Ancho Chiles

Here in Cholula, the market ladies sell pickled sweet-and-hot chipotles known locally as “chipocludos,” a recipe for which was given in this column in the February 2003 issue of Mexico Connect. This recipe, though similar in that it uses piloncillo or brown sugar, is not as picante, and because it uses the much larger ancho […]

0 comments

Cornhusk wrapped chiles stuffed with fresh corn: Chiltamales

In this recipe, corn is cut fresh from the cob and used to fill poblano chiles, which are wrapped in fresh cornhusks, eliminating the need for soaking. Although a metate would traditionally be used to grind the corn in southern Puebla, where chiltamales originated, a blender or food processor makes this dish an easy one. Ingredients: 4 cups corn […]

0 comments

Garlic soup from San Gabriel Chilac: Sopa de ajo

San Gabriel Chilac, the southern Puebla town known for hand-embroidered blouses and dresses, is a garlic-growing region providing this indispensable culinary ingredient to much of the area, where this soup is served with the piquant addition of crushed chile de arbol. Ingredients: 1 head garlic, peeled and thinly sliced 4 tablespoons corn oil 1 arbol […]

0 comments

San Francisco, Ixtacamaxtitlan: Padre Julio Flores

Following a policy of keeping the boys and the girls seperated, Martita and Vidal seldom saw each other at school. It must have been some comfort just knowing that the other was close by. Marta’s dormitory was upstairs in a long building along the side of the complex. The bottom floor served as classrooms. There […]

0 comments

La Ceiba, Puebla: The artist and curandero

La Ceiba is a small town in the state of Puebla on the highway between Mexico City and Poza Rica, Veracruz. It’s about 45 minutes from Poza Rica. The town was named after a large ceiba tree that once grew in the plaza. The name of the town has actually been changed to that of […]

0 comments
Share This:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *