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Chapultepec: Mexico City's urban forest Allan Wall

City parks were not an important part of my life when I was a child. I was raised in the country on a farm which, for all practical purposes, was a park. Growing older, though, I learned to appreciate ... read more

Mexico City's Revolution Monument: Monumento a la Revolucion Anthony Wright

An icon in Mexico City, the Revolution Monument or Monumento a la Revolución is also known as the Arch of the Revolution. It is located on Plaza de la Republica between downtown Reforma and Insurgente... read more

Puente de Ojuela in Durango: a 19th century suspension bridge from Mexico's mining heyday Jeffrey R. Bacon

In a single second, excitement, awe, terror, and fascination passed through my mind, as I began the walk across Mapimi Municipality's Ojuela Bridge, in the Chihuahuan Desert, of eastern Durango, Mexico... read more

Did tequila originate in the Mexican town of Amatitan, Jalisco? John Pint

All the world has been told that tequila, the drink was born in Tequila — the town located 45 kilometers northwest of Guadalajara — but is this really a fact? Curiously, the famed Tequila Express t... read more

Night in Mina Dos Estrellas, a haunted mine in Mexico Anthony Wright

The Dos Estrellas (Two Stars) mine has had a long and checkered history. It was a fabled producer of gold and silver in the 18th century. Then one night more than 70 years ago, the god of the mine vented its wrath, unleashing a tragedy on those who made a living from its veins. read more

Busting ghosts at Xochicalco, Morelos: A UNESCO World Heritage Site Anthony Wright

A ghostly aura emanates from the site - in part, perhaps, due to a lack of crowds. - The pyramid forms part of the archaeological zone of Xochicalco, which shimmers in heat and eerie solitude on a plateau among verdant surrounds in the southwest of the state of Morelos, 23 miles from Cuernavaca. A ghostly aura emanates from the site - in part, perhaps, due to a lack of crowds that permeate Xochicalco's more famous cousins elsewhere in Mexico.

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Touring Mexico's Yucatan ruins David Hammer

We took an early morning ferry from Cozumel to Playa Del Carmen. The warm wind and sea spray felt good on our frost bitten faces, fresh from Northern California. We had previously toured the Mayan rui... read more

Visiting Zacatecas, a UNESCO World Heritage City Jane Ammeson

We follow a meandering street that twists and turns like the best of any Medieval European city. But that, in a way, is what Zacatecas is. A soft dusk has settled over the cobblestone streets of... read more

Did you know? The Sistine Chapel of Mexico Tony Burton

A small church in Michoacán has been called the "Sistine Chapel of the Americas".

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South from Zacatecas: La Quemada archaeological site and Jerez, an undiscovered colonial gem Tony Burton

Click for interactive map Two sites within an hour's drive south of Zacatecas make it well worthwhile to linger at least an extra day when visiting this splendid colonial treasure, described in a p... read more

Did you know? Mexico has five of the world's most endangered heritage sites Tony Burton

Five places in Mexico are on the list of the world's 100 most endangered heritage sites. "The World Monuments Fund (WMF) is the foremost private, nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation o... read more

Zumpango: the guardians of a forgotten cemetery Anthony Wright

"Magic realism" describes a style of Latin American writing where dreams and reality meet on equal footing in worlds lying ephemerally in between, poised to subvert back to the norm the very instant a ... read more

Loreto and San Javier: from sun, sand and snorkeling to museums, missions and mountains Tony Burton

These three towns in Baja California Sur, offer a relaxing alternative to the frenetic pace of life in the pricier and more touristy Los Cabos area. Loreto, Mulegé and Santa Rosalía are very differen... read more

The Zapata Route In Morelos Part 2: His Heart Stopped Beating Julia Taylor

Part 1 - The Land Was in His Heart   Zapata's Death   After leaving Museo Casa de Zapata your next stop in the Zapata Route is in Chinameca where he was shot. It's qui... read more

Church Of Our Lord Of Villaseca Richard Ferguson

Cata, Guanajuato This is part of one wall of the church in Cata, near the town of Guanajuato.  When I visited in 1996, the walls were completely covered with exvotos to a height o... read more

La Hacienda de Nogueras in Comala, Colima Wendy Devlin

La Hacienda de Nogueras is an elegantly restored hacienda hidden in the countryside of Colima. Six miles north of Colima City, it links the region's rich pre-Hispanic past with colonial and modern history. read more

Colonial Lake Pátzcuaro Richard Perry

Travelers who are interested in the history of this region of Michoacán will be well rewarded by a tour of the numerous picturesque villages bordering Lake Pátzcuaro. In addition to their authentic ... read more

Navigating through the cyberspace signposts of Mexican history Ron Mader

Take a look at enough street signs in Mexico and soon you will be pondering the origin of their names. The country's urban geography provides a veritable "Who's Who" of Mexico's heroes and important an... read more

Below Tulum Mike Reed

The vast majority of visitors to Cancun never make it south of Tulum. Yet to many, that's where the adventure starts. The relatively empty region south of Tulum is a delight to nature lovers, ruin buff... read more

The Valley Of The Caves Michael Allan Williams

Imagine living in an adobe home set into a cave halfway up the side of a mountain. Each morning you wake and look out on a vista of gleaming, craggy red rock reaching above forests of dark green pine t... read more

The renovation of Mexico City's Historic Center

Mexico City is one of the world's largest urban centers, and its population continues to grow at a rate unequaled by any other area in the nation. The Mexico City region has long been the center of eco... read more

Did you know? "The Bells of San Blas", Nayarit, Mexico Tony Burton

The author of the famous poem "The Bells of San Blas" had never ever visited the town. The San Blas that the poem refers to is in the state of Nayarit, on the Pacific coast. Today, it is a small town,... read more

Moon Handbooks: Guadalajara by Bruce Whipperman Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Here's a welcome addition to the growing library of Mexican guidebooks. It covers all the information you would expect, like motels, hotels, bed & breakfasts, restaurants, shopping, money exchange locations, tourist highlights and how to get from one place to another. In addition, there's an abundance of information on such items as bus fares, rental cars, walking and jogging routes, exercise gyms, language courses and even where to get rolls of film processed. read more

Mexicasa: The Enchanting Inns and Haciendas of Mexico by Gina Hyams and Melba Levick Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Gina Hyams and Melba Levick have created a wonderful compilation of photographs of twenty-one of Mexico's most spectacular and beautiful inns and bed and breakfast establishments. This one is a real winner. read more

Relive the romance of colonial Mexico at a hacienda hotel Bob Brooke

Staying at a Mexican hacienda hotel is like being transported back in time. The casa principal or main house usually stands before an elegant garden ablaze with purple bougainvillea and red flam... read more
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