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Guelaguetza Maria Diaz

Monday, July 21, 2014, the colorful pageantry of Mexico's Guelaguetza is reenacted once again during the Lunes del Cerro (Mondays on the Hill. A Zapotec word signifying offering or offertory, Guelaguetza was the term used to describe the Oaxaca ceremony and celebration held each year to propitiate the gods in return for sufficient rain and a bountiful harvest. Today it is one of the most colorful fiestas in Mexico. read more

Reborn in the temazcal: A traditional native Mexican American purification ceremony Jeffrey R. Bacon

We sit in darkness, on an earthen floor. Hot vapor condenses and drips down my skin as I hug my knees against my chest and breathe lightly to cool the scalding vapor before it reaches my lungs. The bea... read more

Mexican posadas and a famous Christmas carol Jenny McGill

Christmas posada<br>© Dale Hoyt Palfrey, 1996
Beginning on December 16, Mexican children have their nine days of posadas before Christmas. Two are chosen to dress up like Joseph and Mary and lead the other neighborhood children from house to house singing a request for a place to rest. There are singers inside the houses they pass who are programmed to sing a refusal of lodging. Finally, they arrive at a house where they are received and refreshments are served. read more

Ethnic diversity in Mexico Index Page

Mexico is an ethnically diverse country. To understand México, one must understand her peoples, their history and contributions to what is the México of today. Within this section, we consider those ... read more

Dancing with the Stars: Carnival on Cozumel David Hammer

As a wave of dancers flooded the street, the beat of the salsa flowed through my body. My feet moved and my shoulders shimmied. A beautiful dancer, wearing an off-the-shoulder dress leaned toward me an... read more

Cinco de Mayo celebrations in Mexico Donald W Miles

There are Mexicans these days who have never attended a Cinco de Mayo celebration. The holiday has taken a back seat to the many saints' days and other festivals. The growth of celebrations in the Uni... read more

On the edge of Mexico City: barefoot monks in a national park Tony Burton

Which village in Mexico celebrates the passing of the Old Year and the entrance of the New in the most unusual way? Almost certainly, the village of Santa Rosa Xochiac, just thirty minutes by car south... read more

The Meseta Purepecha in Michoacan

This guide takes you through the highways and backroads of Michoacán, where time seems to have stopped amid the jewels of colonial architecture and life in the Meseta Purépecha. Michoacán is history, culture, tradition, customs, fairs, fiestas, dances, music, arts and crafts, cuisine, architecture, archaeology, and diverse natural beauty. The Meseta Purépecha is the best example of what makes up Michoacán, and that's why Michoacán is the soul of Mexico.

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A Shrine To Santa Lucia Richard Ferguson

St. Lucia is the patron saint of eyes. The story is told that she was very beautiful, and had many suitors. One of them said that he had fallen uncontrollably in love with her eyes. She... read more

Catemaco and Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz: almost paradise Richard Ferguson

The arch at the entrance to the city of Catemaco says "Escape to Paradise!"  Catemaco is both a town and a lake in the region known as Los Tuxtlas, in southern Veracruz state. The area is very green and wet, much of it covered by jungle. The Gulf of Mexico is nearby, and the area includes a biosphere preserve. The region is known for ecotourism.

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Indigenous Mexico: an overview John P. Schmal

The Republic of Mexico is a very large country, boasting a total area of almost 1,978,000 square kilometers (760,000 square miles) and a population of 103,400,165 (July 2002 estimate). With its central... read more

Did you know? Even "microwaves" are signposted along Mexico's roads Tony Burton

One of Mexico's best kept travel secrets for people driving their own vehicle is the multitude of road signs all beginning with the word "microondas" (literally “microwaves”). Even visitors ... read more

Mexico's Danza de los Voladores - a photo-essay Tony Burton

One of the most spectacular dances in the country — la Danza de Los Voladores, literally the Dance of the Flyers — involves only five participants.In the old days, they first had to find a suitable... read more

Did you know? The first Mexico tourist guide books Tony Burton

Comprehensive guide books to Mexico have existed for more than 120 years. Modern travelers to Mexico are often hard-pressed to choose their favorite guide. Fodor's, Frommer's, Real Guide, Insight Guid... read more

Did you know? Mexico has one of the world's oldest still-functioning printing presses Tony Burton

One of the oldest printing presses still in operation anywhere in the world is in Tacámbaro, Michoacán. Juan Pascoe lives on a remote ex-hacienda outside Tacámbaro, Michoacán. Visitors invited to ... read more

Semana Santa Holy Week in San Miguel de Allende Geri Anderson

Semana Santa, or Holy Week, is a misnomer. It s NOT one week! It’s TWO full weeks of parades, processions, parties, prayers and pagentry. For me, it started at 3 a.m. March 16, 1997--two Sundays before Easter. Fireworks. Loud booms. Without a pause. That’s why I remember the exact hour.

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Exvotos To St. Francis Of Assisi Richard Ferguson

The pictures here were taken in the church in the old mining town of Real de Catorce, in San Luis Potosi.  There is a side room of the church dedicated to exvotos. 

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Charreria Dale Hoyt Palfrey

Horse lovers (and anyone else looking for a dose of authentic Mexico) will find September is the perfect month to take in the best of the country's national equestrian sport -- la charrería. It's... read more

A Season Of Hope Dale Hoyt Palfrey

If Lake Chapala could speak for itself, Mark Twain's famous comment might come to mind: "The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated." Since torrential rains began battering much of ce... read more

Hey Compadre Alvin Starkman

One day they may be calling you, so be ready and learn what it means read more

Mexican espectaculos, or rodeo-type shows, a mini-series. the introduction. Wendy Devlin

Series Index How well can a person understand a culture not their own? Can experiences be understood without full command of the Spanish language; a language in which civility is interwoven l... read more

Colima: City of the Palms Wendy Devlin

Palm trees reach towards the sky above the plaza. Water gushes from a swan-shaped fountain. Flowers bloom profusely. A banner above the bandstand declares February a month of 'Love and Friendship' in C... read more

The passion of Christ in Ixtapalapa, a Mexico City neighborhood John Neubauer

The first traces of an awakening sun touch the morning horizon, brushing aside the night's long shadows. On the streets of Ixtapalapa, a working class neighborhood 30 minutes by cab from the center of ... read more

Identity narratives by American and Canadian retirees in Mexico Stephen P. Banks

Overview (by Tony Burton): Banks lived in the area for a couple of months (October and November) in 2002, and had a follow-up visit the next year. He recorded 26 in-depth interviews (1.5 ... read more

Tequila, Lemon and Salt: From Baja - Tales of Love, Faith and Magic by Daniel Reveles Reviewed by Allan Cogan

The location for these nine stories is the town of Tecate in the Baja, located 34 miles east of Tijuana. Tucked away in the extreme northwest of Mexico, it couldn't possibly be any closer to the U.S. border. The town can also boast that it is the home of Daniel Reveles, author of three attractive collections of novellas. The latest of these is the one reviewed here. read more
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