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All results for tag “travelogue”
Showing 51—75 of 103 results

Traveling to Tapalpa Marvin West

After an all-Mexico breakfast of fresh-squeezed orange juice, honeydew, banana, raspberries and mango, we dusted off our faithful VW bug and pointed it toward Tapalpa. (Tom McEwen of the Tampa Tribune... read more

Sliced Iguana: Travels in Unknown Mexico by Isabella Tree Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Isabella Tree tells about her solitary travels to various parts of Mexico. Is this becoming a sort of literary sub-category - single ladies taking on the world? This book largely consists of a half dozen essays covering specific geographic areas that Ms. Tree visited, including Mexico City, Chiapas and Lake Pátzcuaro. My own personal favorite was "Holy Week," the one on San Miguel de Allende. read more

Why are there so few ex-pats living in Morelia? Allan Cogan

It’s a surprise to visit a likeable, livable city like Morelia for the first time and find there’s almost no gringo community there. In fact, one resident put the number at 100 to 150 total. And only a handful of those are the retirees who are so prevelant in Jalisco. Most Americans, for example, are associated with the university in Morelia, as both teachers and students. read more

Oaxaca Journal by Oliver Sacks Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Oliver Sacks is obviously too seasoned a traveller and too astute an observer to confine himself to ferns. One encounters a host of pleasures as he ruminates on a variety of topics. He muses about the New World's contributions to civilization -cocoa, tobacco, potatoes, tomatoes, chilies, gourds, pepper, maize, chewing gum, cochineal and exotic hallucinogens. In Monte Alban he considers the production of rubber which the Zapotec people used to make balls. read more

San Miguel: the town that parties too much Bill Begalke

The Valle de Maiz drops away from the old highway to Queretaro into a narrow, gloomy gulch, the dirt streets bounded by broken walls, unfinished homes, dark shadowed places and an occasional vacant lot... read more

Approaching the Cosmos... Hotel: Travelling the World with a Gay Sensibility by Robert Champ Reviewed by Allan Cogan

This is a book of travel essays by a man who certainly has covered the world. I've chosen to review it here because so many of the pieces are concerned with places in Mexico, such as Oaxaca, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico City and Guanajuato as well as my own familiar territory here in Ajijic and the Lake Chapala area. Other locations include Russia, China, Ireland, Paris, the French Riviera and some U.S. cities. In fact, for me one of the most interesting articles was about the author's running away from home in Kansas City with another boy and hitchhiking to San Diego. read more

Taking the "waters" in Mexico Bob Brooke

Ahhhh. Oohhh. Awww. Mmmmmm.” These are the sounds most often heard as bathers first step into a warm mineral pool. More and more North Americans are discovering the pleasures and benefits of soaking ... read more

Western Mexico: A Traveller's Treasury by Tony Burton Reviewed by Allan Cogan

This useful volume is back in a new and updated edition and it’s still as essential as ever. Whether you’re making a brief visit as a tourist, or escaping the northern winter for a few months or checking out the area more extensively as a place to spend one’s retirement years, this is one item you should have in your survival kit. It’s a nice blend of guidebook, travelogue and history text with lots of local color and some ecological notes sprinkled throughout. read more

Mexico City's miracle mile (or two) Bill Begalke

"Wait," she protested. She bent over the crouched photographer busily framing the pleasant scene for posterity, his camera at the ready, shutter cocked. She spoke loudly into his ear. "Wait!" On the v... read more

The five faces of God: Mexico's Sierra Gorda missions Bill Begalke

They are known as the missions of the Sierra Gorda.

There are others he constructed, to be sure; the California missions are famous around the world. But the most splendid of all of Serra's missions, the ones in Mexico, are themselves a paradox.

These particularly marvelous monuments rest among the mountains in Queretaro state, all within a few minutes drive of each other. They are the crowning jewels of the pueblos of Jalpan, Concá, Tilaco, Landa, and Tancoyol.

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Mexico mountaineering expedition on Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltepetl) Jay Boynton

Mexico's Highest Volcano (Citlaltepetl) PART ONE: ORIGINS PART TWO: GETTING THERE PART THREE: PIEDRA GRANDE ... read more

Chihuahua's Copper Canyon: the treasure of the Sierra Madres Roberta Sotonoff

IF YOU GO . . . TRANSPORTATION ARRANGEMENTS AND ACCOMMODATIONS REFERENCES Alongside the railroad trac... read more

Cabo! Joyce Wade

It all began last Christmas when my husband and I had a delightful dinner out with his two sisters. One sister lives near us in Southern California and the other was visiting from Seattle. The conversa... read more

Circling Lake Chapala Larry Landwehr

Today Mary and I set out to drive completely around Lake Chapala, Mexico’s biggest lake. It’s quite an undertaking, about a 180-mile drive. Before hitting the road, we went to “Sanborns” fo... read more

Ciudad del Carmen, Campeche Linda Watts

"It's this heat... this heat... that scorches every cell of my body that kills me about this place," the Texan says while sipping his drink. "I'm going to be a linguistic genius with that phrase ... read more

Guanajuato: Journey to the center of the universe Bill Begalke

The most important visual image in the classic film, " Close Encounters of the Third Kind," was not the alien spaceship, but the imposing stone monolith chosen as the site of the encounter. In an att... read more

On Mexican Time: A New Life in San Miguel Reviewed by Allan Cogan

"My editor wanted me to write about life here in the region where we live. At that time, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato and Querétero ranked a page or two each in the guide books, day stops or overnighters on a tour of the ‘silver cities,’ the subject of an occasional tourist piece in a Sunday travel section, the ‘charming little town hidden away in the Mexican mountains.’ Don’t put a gloss on it, the editor said. Tell what life is really like, the good and the bad. Tell the truth a good fiction writer knows.” read more

Road Trip: Mexico Discussion Thread Forum

Mexico City, Querétaro, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Morelia, Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta Posted by Bill on Mayo 12, 2000 Some of you might find the following article interesting in whic... read more

The sky cities of Queretaro Bill Begalke

The Saturday movie-matinee feature of pre-television history introduced my entire generation to the mystery and adventure of lost cities lurking in the dank depths of the world's remote jungles. Great ... read more

A wee malarkey about Melaque, a beach town on the Mexican Pacific Wendy Devlin

San Patricio/Melaque, on the Pacific Coast of Jalisco draws its name from Saint Patrick. Legend goes that Saint Patrick brought Christianity to Ireland and drove out all the snakes to boot. Locals say ... read more

The Road To El Dorado Luther Butler

From Stephenville, Texas to Baja California, Mexico March 7, - March 30, 2000 AD   Dodge Minivan 1994 Modified for a wheelchair ramp. Passengers: Luther Butler...........Backseat... read more

Mexico, a Higher Vision: An Aerial Journey from Past to Present by Michael Calderwood Reviewed by Allan Cogan

This is the first coffee-table book I ever reviewed and I have to say right off the bat that it's a winner. It is made up of some 200 photographs from all parts of Mexico - all of them taken from a high elevation, either an aircraft or mountaintop or, occasionally, a tall building. At first it sounds like a rather limited concept but in execution the "godlike" perspective works beautifully to highlight the uniqueness of this country. What this handsome volume delivers is a treasure trove of striking views of deserts, cities, villages, volcanoes, mountain ranges, desolate beaches, crowded beaches, jungles, individual buildings and other striking images. We look down on huge elaborate temple ruins in the midst of lush jungle or on abandoned haciendas in arid desert country, as well as on vast populated modern cities and luxury resorts. read more

Aqui es México Bill Begalke

Of all the most endearing and enduring charms that draw travelers back to Mexico, the effect that the country can have upon a sense of humor is the most magical. It arises out of an initial attitude o... read more

Our Mexico hotel in Melaque Wendy Devlin

One hour north of Manzanillo, Colima, the Primero Plus gave one final jolt in front of Melaque’s bus station. From air-conditioned comfort, we stepped down into the afternoon warmth. By arriving mid ... read more

Mornings in Mexico by D. H. Lawrence

I should confess right off the bat that this one is out of print. Amazon.com doesn’t have any copies. However, I’m sure it’s still available in libraries or used bookstores. In any case, it’s worth looking for. It’s a collection of essays and travel pieces that resulted from Lawrence’s visits to Mexico and New Mexico in the early 1920s. Some wonderful descriptive writing is to be found here. read more
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