MexConnect
All results for tag “social-issues”
Showing 51—75 of 219 results

Did You Know? Blacks outnumbered Spaniards until after 1810 Tony Burton

By common consent, the history of blacks in Mexico is a long one. The first black slave to set foot in Mexico is thought to have been Juan Cortés. He accompanied the conquistadors in 1519. It has been... read more

Elvira Arellano: saint or sinner? Maggie Van Ostrand

When Elvira Arellano illegally crossed the U.S. border in 1997, she had no idea that one day, she would become a beacon of light in the darkness of U.S. immigration politics, nor that Time magazine wou... read more

This means war John McClelland

The financial impacts of poor water quality on Mexico are nothing short of staggering. In any discussion about visiting Mexico, somebody always pipes up with the comment "Don't drink the water." If I ... read more

The fence along the Mexican border Maggie Van Ostrand

The English-speaking people of the world aren't always as smart as, say, Stephen Hawking who writes about cosmic stuff like time, black holes and the universe, but wouldn't you think the people in char... read more

Fragment Jorge Tirado

A simple vista vi un fragmento de tierra en alguna costa, frente a un océano. El vistazo se transformó en mirada. Me sumergí momentáneamente en la contemplación. Varias ideas surcaron mi mente, ... read more

Fragment Jorge Tirado

David Aguilar, chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, said the United States is experiencing a large increase in the number of illegal entries, according to the US State Department. New to Mexconnect, J... read more

How To Correct Misconceptions About Mexico - And Lose Your Friends At The Same Time Maggie Van Ostrand

We who live in Mexico, whether full- or part-time, have a duty to correct the enormous amount of misinformation perpetuated by foreign media. More creatures live with their heads in the sand than the o... read more

Michoacán's rural education Amanda Villagómez

Michoacán Index Gracias y Credits The State: State Map Introduction to Michoacán The Meseta Purepecha - Exploring Michoacán Alternative Tourism in Michoac... read more

Crossing Over: A Mexican Family On The Migrant Trail Reviewed by jennifer j. rose

Great books are the hardest kind to review. There's just too much temptation to toss out the usual lauds and accolades which make for fine back cover blurbs. And then there's the trap of comparison to other great authors and works. CROSSING OVER: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail is one of those great books.

read more

Ojo Del Lago - The Tarahumaras: And Endangered Species Shep Lenchek

Never conquered by the Aztecs and despite being defeated by Mexican armies, the Tarahumaras still consider themselves an independant nation. So strong is this conviction that in the Fifties they more t... read more

Murder in Mexico: an English family during the Revolution Julia Swanson

Julia Swanson tells the extraordinary tale of her English grandfather and his family who were tragically caught up in the violence of the Mexican Revolution. read more

Our beloved Oaxaca, now on US and Canadian Do Not Visit list Maggie Van Ostrand

Is no one thinking of the ordinary people of Oaxaca and how this event is causing distress and loss of income? read more

The Mexican Maggie Van Ostrand

It's easy to tell an election is coming in the U.S., because here we go again with the border situation, better known as the "Let's build a fence to keep them out" game. If U.S. politicians were really... read more

Dying to become an American Maggie Van Ostrand

There's an easier way to become an American citizen than marching in emotional parades for immigration rights or studying U.S. history and being wait-listed for years, or even marrying into it. You ca... read more

The Devil's Highway: A True Story by Luis Alberto Urrea Reviewed by Allan Cogan

This is the story of a group of men who have become known as the Yuma 14. They are the fourteen illegal immigrants who died attempting to cross the Arizona border in May, 2001. And what a terrible and upsetting story it is. Unknown numbers of these illegal immigrants die every year making the dangerous crossing on foot over one of the most inhospitable stretches of terrain in the world. But the Yuma 14 constituted the largest known number of such immigrants to die at one time. read more

The Guaymas Chronicles: La Mandadera by David E. Stuart Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Although it's about Mexico, this one starts off in Ecuador in the 1960s where the author was doing doctoral fieldwork for a dissertation on haciendas in that country. His work took him to a remote research station on the side of a mountain seventy miles from electricity, running water, telephones, etc. One day while riding his horse along the side of a gorge, with the bottom of a canyon almost a thousand feet below him, the horse stumbled and fell. On its way over the edge it rolled over Stuart and disappeared, leaving him badly crippled. He was rescued and eventually found his way to Guaymas, on the coast of the Sea of Cortez, in Mexico, where his fiancé, Iliana, lived. Thus begins the story of his recuperation and, at the same time, the exploration of Mexican society and customs which is described here. read more

Lloyd Mexico Economic Report June 2004

Table of Contents Strong economy Encouraging tourism numbers City express hotels ... read more

Lloyd Mexico Economic Report October 2005

Table of Contents State of the Nation Report The Fight Against Poverty ... read more

Lloyd Mexico Economic Report October 2003

Table of Contents STATE OF THE NATION REPORT POLITICAL ADVANCES RESIZING THE GOVERNMENT ... read more

Mexico, a Traveller's Literary Companion by C. M. Mayo Reviewed by Allan Cogan

I've reviewed over a hundred books for Mexico Connect. These have covered the gamut of topics, all related to this country - fiction, travel, history, living in Mexico, moving to Mexico, biographies, city profiles and a few volumes difficult to categorize. I thought I had covered just about all aspects of the subject. Imagine my surprise, then, to suddenly be reminded of a sizeable slice of Mexicana that I had barely touched. Discovering it was like opening a door and walking into a brightly lit room filled with all kinds of literary treasures, all of which were produced in Mexico by active homegrown writers, many of whom are probably known to Mexican readers but not necessarily to outsiders like myself who need much more familiarity with Spanish in order to appreciate the breadth and scope of this country's literature. read more

How my Mexican relatives came to California and saved the US economy Maggie Van Ostrand

If you are a very lucky person, somebody in your family marries into a Mexican family and you end up with an abundance of diversified riches in your life. Your home rings with laughter in at least two... read more

San Miguel and the War of Independence by Mamie Spiegel Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Ms. Spiegel's account mainly covers what she calls the viceregal period, also known as the colonial era, which lasted from 1521 to 1821. Mexico at that time was the richest and most populous of Spain's overseas dominions. It was at the end of this period, in 1810, that the War of Independence erupted with San Miguel and the nearby town of Dolores being the focal points of that outbreak. The war was to last eleven years. read more

The Huichol Center for Cultural Survival

Susana Eger Valadez traveled to Mexico about 20 years ago while working on her Master of Arts Degree in Latin American Studies. She completed the degree from the University of California at Los Angeles... read more
Showing 51—75 of 219 results
All Tags