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All results for tag “religion”
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A Huichol creation story Ronald A. Barnett ©

Tawexikia the sun centers this nierika or Huichol votive yarn painting. The blue deer accopanies the sun.
© Kinich Ramirez, 2006
A Huichol friend of mine, Juan Bautista Carillo, came up with the idea of a trilingual edition (Huichol, Spanish, English) of traditional Huichol narratives,

The original version entitled Historia El Tau-Sol (Huichol and Spanish for "sun", which I translated using both the Huichol and the Spanish versions, came to about 3368 words. Therefore I shall give a condensed version of the main outline followed by an attempt to explain its meaning and significance.

This is not an account of the creation of human beings but of their main means of sustenance, namely fire and the sun. Accordingly this particular Huichol narrative begins with the creation of the first hearth fire... read more

Tears from the Crown of Thorns: The Easter Passion Play in San Miguel de Allende Reviewed by Allan Cogan

"People unfamiliar with the Latin culture are curious, confused, and sometimes repulsed by the emphasis on suffering in religious figures. During Easter in North America, the focus is on the resurrection and the delights of spring. The event is concerned with the awe of transformation. There is resistance to facing the suffering that is a major part of this epic…." read more

Night of the altars in San Miguel de Allende Edythe Anstey Hanen

It is late afternoon in Mexico, two days before Palm Sunday, and it is the day that honours Nuestra Señora de los Dolores — Our Lady of Sorrows. All over town, San Miguel de Allende's families and b... read more

San Patricio by the Sea on Mexico's Pacific coast Marvin West

San Patricio by the Sea, an interdenominational community church on Mexico's Pacific coast
© Marvin West, 2014
As churches go, San Patricio by the Sea is an intriguing addition in the low-rent district.

It had a humble beginning, born of need in the late 1990s.

There were hundreds, maybe a few thousands, of Americans and Canadians, residents and snowbirds, in the region but no religious services in English for many, many miles along the west bank, nothing from El Tecuan to Manzanillo and beyond... read more

Lenten traditions in Oaxaca: Our Lady of Sorrows Tara Lowry

A life-sized Virgin Mary statue with imploring, heaven-raised eyes welcomed me into the courtyard of my favourite café in Oaxaca, Mexico. Dozens of what looked to me to be chia pets surrounded her. Wh... read more

Dressing Baby Jesus: Dia de la Candelaria in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

All around town, people are carrying babies. It takes me a moment to realize, (mostly because they are swaddled in blankets) that they are not real babies but dolls. Then it takes me another moment and... read more

Three Kings Day in Cajititlan, Mexico Sergio Wheeler

In Mexico, Christmas decorations stay up though January 6. The holiday celebrates Epiphany, when the Three Kings or Wise Men visited the baby Jesus with precious gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. El Día de los Santos Reyes is celebrated throughout Mexico. Yet nowhere is Three Kings Day more festive than in Cajititlan de Los Reyes, just 6.2 miles from Ajijic, Jalisco. read more

Paying tribute to Our Lady of Guadalupe in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

The Mestiza Madonna. La Virgen Ranchera. The Queen of the Americas. Mystical Rose… no matter what name she is called, one thing is for sure: the beloved Virgin of Guadalupe is the mother of all Mexic... read more

Easter in Mexico, Semana Santa and Pascua: a Mexican holiday resource page Index Page

For Mexico, the Easter holidays are a combination of Semana Santa (Holy Week — Palm Sunday to Easter Saturday) and Pascua (Resurrection Sunday until the following Saturday). For most Mexicans, this 2 week period is the time of year for holiday vacations (good time to not be on the highways — just stay put and enjoy the community of your choice during this holday season). Holy Week celebrates the last days of the Christ's life. Easter is the celebration of the Christ's Resurrection. It is also the release from the sacrifices of Lent. read more

Easter in San Miguel de Allende: Our Lord of the Column Edythe Anstey Hanen

The church bells have been tolling most of the night, interrupted only intermittently by the blast of rockets soaring into the night sky. One resounding boom echoes throughout the city at midnight. Thi... read more

A brief history of the Jews in Mexico Mel Goldberg

Mexico today has a Jewish community of between 40,000 to 50,000 with about 37,000 living in Mexico city. The majority of them, Mexican citizens who practice Judaism, are descendents of people who, from 1881 to 1939, found refuge here. Because Mexican economic prosperity allowed religious tolerance, Jews enjoyed the same rights as any other Mexican citizen. read more

Curious coming to Mexico's Mormon Colonia Juarez Marvin West

The Mexican Romneys are descendants of great-grandpa Miles Park Romney and three or four wives who moved south in 1886, out of reach of new U.S. laws prohibiting polygamy.

Miles and other Mormon pioneers made something out of almost nothing and the small towns are is still there in the Chihuahua desert, not far from the Piedras Verdes River, on the flat ground near the Sierra Madre Occidental.

Colonia Juarez is 15 or 20 kilometers southwest of Casas Grandes. read more

Good Friday in San Miguel de Allende Carol Wheeler

Holy Week — from Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday — is observed throughout Mexico. However San Miguel de Allende's fervor and pageantry are some of the most powerful and beautiful. The image of E... read more

Benedict XVI: the Pope in Mexico makes Catholic news Daniel Wheeler

Pope Benedict XVI makes his first visit to Mexico this month, which is important news in this predominantly Catholic nation. Appropriately, his visit — from March 23 to the 26th — coincides with Lent, the 40 days before Easter dedicated to reflection and repentance.

His predecessor Pope John Paul II visited Mexico on five occasions and was much beloved here. I was just a child during the last papal visit in 2002, a rowdy little Catholic boy who wanted to be a rock star when I grew up. read more

Guadalupe: La Virgen Indigena Dale Hoyt Palfrey

virgin of guadalupe Our Lady of Guadalupe is the beloved patron saint of Mexico and the Americas. Celebrated on December 12, her feast day is a major Mexican holiday. Juan Diego's mantle, carefully preserved in the Basilica, has been subjected to extensive analysis over the years. Experts have authenticated the fabric as dating to the 16th century, but have been unable to determine the type of pigment from which the image was rendered. Most wonderous of all, after 465 years, the image of the Virgen de Guadalupe remains clearly imprinted on the miraculous cloak without visible signs of deterioration. read more

November 2: the Day of the Dead Dale Hoyt Palfrey

Her face is unforgettable and she goes by many names: La Catrina, la Flaca, la Huesuda, la Pelona — Fancy Lady, Skinny, Bony, Baldy. A fixture in Mexican society, she's not some trendy fashion model, but La Muerte — Death. November 1, All Saints Day, and November 2, All Souls Day are marked throughout Mexico by a plethora of intriguing customs that vary widely according to the ethnic roots of each region. Common to all, however, are colorful adornments and lively reunions at family burial plots, the preparation of special foods, offerings laid out for the departed on commemorative altars and religious rites that are likely to include noisy fireworks. read more

Was the Aztec's Nahuatl literature a Spanish invention? Translation and evangelism Ronald A. Barnett ©

In ancient Mexico, the spoken word or the oral tradition was greatly reinforced by the use of painted books in which native history and religion were preserved and handed down through successive generations. The Maya had the most advanced system of writing in the Americas at the time Europeans began to arrive, but the Mixtec and Aztec peoples also had a very efficient system of written communication. read more

Saint Anthony and John the Baptist: June festivals at Lake Chapala Judy King

Church dedicated to Saint Anthony of Padua in San Antonio Tlayacapan, Mexico.
© Taner Sirin, 2011
During June, we investigate the history, lives and legends of Saint Anthony of Padua, the beloved patron saint of San Antonio Tlayacapan and San Juan Cosala's Saint John the Baptist as these communities on Mexico's Chapala lakeshore focus for nine days on processions, masses, sky rockets and devotions. Each community will begin each of the nine days preceding their Saint's Day with early morning firecrackers to awaken the village for the morning pilgrimage to mass... read more

The Religious Virgins and Saints of Mexico: las Virgenes y santos de Mexico Index Page

An Index Page of Articles, Images and Resources.

read more

Silver, saints, and sinners™: Semana Santa in Taxco, Mexico Jim Allen and Jan McHargue

The City of Silver If you have heard of the picturesque, old colonial Mexican town of Taxco at all, you probably associate it with that precious metal so characteristic of Mexico – silver. If you... read more

Our Lady of Guadalupe: Tonantzin or the Virgin Mary? Ronald A. Barnett ©

It was on December 9, 1531, when Juan Diego, a humble Indian peasant, was crossing the hill of Tepeyac just north of present day Mexico City that — it is said— a beautiful shining woman miraculously appeared to him. Declaring herself to be the Virgin Mary, Mother of Christ, she called Juan her son. He reported his vision to Bishop Juan de Zumarraga, who demanded additional evidence of the divine apparition. On December 12 then, Juan Diego returned to Tepeyac, where the Virgin told him to gather roses where none had grown previously. Then, when the Indian delivered the roses to the Bishop, the image of the Virgin Mary miraculously appeared on his cloak. read more
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