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All results for tag “indigenous-groups”
Showing 26—50 of 173 results

Did You Know? Vanilla Festival in Papantla, Veracruz Tony Burton

The Vanilla Festival is held in early summer every year in Papantla, Veracruz. The origins of the festival pre-date the Spanish conquest. Its timing is now tied to the Catholic celebration of the Feast... read more

Did you know? In Chiapas, Mexico's Mam turn to organic farming Tony Burton

Organic farming has helped some indigenous peoples in Mexico to reinvent themselves. How many people are there? According to INEGI figures, about six million Mexicans over the age of five speak at le... read more

Did You Know? Sixty-two indigenous languages still spoken in Mexico Tony Burton

As many as 62 indigenous languages are still spoken in Mexico. Most people realize that the national language of Mexico is Spanish and that Mexico is the world's largest Spanish speaking country. In f... read more

The Cuisine of Hidalgo: Spanning Climates and Cultures Karen Hursh Graber

Over the years, on road trips from Central Mexico to various parts of the U.S., we have explored different routes, some more scenic than others. One of the most unforgettable included the state of Hida... read more

Did you know? Oaxaca is the most culturally diverse state in Mexico Tony Burton

The inter-census population count in Mexico in 2005 found that more than one million people in Oaxaca spoke at least one indigenous Indian language. Close behind came the state of Chiapas with about 95... read more

Ojo Del Lago - The Tarahumaras: And Endangered Species Shep Lenchek

Never conquered by the Aztecs and despite being defeated by Mexican armies, the Tarahumaras still consider themselves an independant nation. So strong is this conviction that in the Fifties they more t... read more

The Log from the Sea of Cortez by John Steinbeck Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Back in 1940, just before Pearl Harbour, John Steinbeck and his marine biologist friend, Ed Rickets, chartered a fishing boat, the Western Flyer, in Monterey, California, and sailed down the coast around the Baja into the Sea of Cortez. Their six-week mission was to collect specimens of marine life in the area. They jointly wrote a book about the voyage, largely about marine biology, which was published in 1941. A decade later, Steinbeck himself wrote this more personal book. The result is a mixture of travel writing, journalism, diary-keeping, philosophy, meditation and, yes, there's a lot of stuff about the marine life of the area. After all, the author was something of an authority in that field. read more

San Miguel and the War of Independence by Mamie Spiegel Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Ms. Spiegel's account mainly covers what she calls the viceregal period, also known as the colonial era, which lasted from 1521 to 1821. Mexico at that time was the richest and most populous of Spain's overseas dominions. It was at the end of this period, in 1810, that the War of Independence erupted with San Miguel and the nearby town of Dolores being the focal points of that outbreak. The war was to last eleven years. read more

So Sings the Blue Deer: a book on Mexico's Huichol people Charmayne McGee

So Sings the Blue Deer is based upon the true story of the Huichol Indian's 600 mile pilgrimage to save the Earth from environmental destruction.

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Yarn painting - images of a vanishing culture Maria von Bolschwing

The Huichol Indians, whose pre-Hispanic culture still survives in the remote Sierra Madres ranges, live a life woven of magic and sacred mythology. Believing themselves to be that part of creation whic... read more

The Huichol Center for Cultural Survival

Susana Eger Valadez traveled to Mexico about 20 years ago while working on her Master of Arts Degree in Latin American Studies. She completed the degree from the University of California at Los Angeles... read more

The Tarasco culture and empire

Among the fertile volcanoes of Michoacan Lumholtz came across the Purepecha people, who were called Tarascan by the Spanish. Enemies of the Aztecs, the Tarascans flourished from 1100 A.D. to 1530 A.D. ... read more

Into a realm of spirits: a Native American sweat lodge ceremony kim kroonenburg

Coyote doesn't offer a word to guide us through this mysterious and arduous process. He leaves us to our own world, to our private vision quest. The sweltering heat of the lodge... read more

The Maya Civilization, Maya Numerals And Calendar Luis Dumois

Mayan Numeric System Ancient Maya discovered two fundamental ideas in mathematics: positional value and the concept of zero. This feat was accomplished by only one other great culture of antiquity, th... read more

The Family That Carves Together.... Eliseo Castillo, Enedina Castillo Castillo Charles Dews

"Does your husband ever carve nudes," I asked Enedina Castillo Castillo, only half jokingly. She grinned up at me with those wise eyes. "Once he carved a David that looked like the one by Miguel Angel... read more

Along Party Lines Karina Ioffee

No one had heard of Chiapas until January 1, 1994, when the EZLN seized government offices in the state capital of San Cristobal and five other surrounding towns. Now the Zapatistas are world re-known ... read more

Bobby Vaughn's homepage: Afro-Mexicans of Costa Chica Bobby Vaughn

Afro-Mexicans of the Costa Chica   The purpose of these web pages is to introduce you to the culture and unique experience of Mexicans of African descent. If you are like most pe... read more

The cuisine of Veracruz: a tasty blend of cultures Karen Hursh Graber

Exotic-looking even on a map, the Mexican state of Veracruz stretches along the Gulf Coast like the graceful tentacle of a sea creature. Within the boundaries formed by the warm coastal waters to the e... read more

Seasonal Dining: Mexican Wild Game - Part Two: Rabbit and Venison Karen Hursh Graber

As discussed in last month's column, wild game played an important culinary role in pre-Hispanic Mexico. Although the Aztecs, Maya and other Mesoamerican people relied on corn as the staple food, along... read more

Sixteenth century indigenous Jalisco John P. Schmal

Jalisco is La Madre Patria (the Mother Country) for millions of Mexican Americans. Given this fact, it makes sense that many sons and daughters of Jalisco are curious about the cultural and linguistic ... read more

A yearly culinary ritual: La matanza Karen Hursh Graber

Beginning in mid-October, and lasting for a month, a five-hundred-year-old ritual encompassing history, tradition and cuisine takes place in the valley of Tehuacan, in the Mixteca Poblana region of sou... read more

Instituto Cientifico de Na Bolom: a magical place in Chiapas for Maya studies Larry Freeman

For an exotic place and a surprising destination, I strongly recommend The Instituto Cientifico de Na Bolom, the Scientific Institute of Na Bolom (House of the Tiger). It is located in the State... read more
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