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All articles for tag “history”
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Mexico this month - May Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of May.

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Mexico this month - April Tony Burton

Statue of Revolutionary hero Emiliano Zapata
© Julia Taylor 2007

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of April.

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Mexican Kaleidoscope - Myths, Mysteries & Mystique. A review of Tony Burton's newest book. Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Tony Burton’s recently published Mexican Kaleidoscope is a whirlwind trip through some of the underpinnings of Mexican culture, told with humour, affection and well-documented facts. This readable compendium of little known stories made me want to revisit many places I’d already seen. How much richer my experiences would have been had I been able to take this user-friendly and easily carried tome of gems with me when I was in Mexico. read more

Mexico this month - March Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of March. read more

Mexico this month - February Tony Burton

February 20, 1943 — A brand-new volcano, subsequently called Paricutín, erupts in a farmer’s field in Michoacan. It attracts world-wide attention. In succeeding years of eruption, two villages, Paricutin and San Juan Parangaricutirimícuaro are lost beneath the lava. Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of February.

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Review of Dr. Michael Hogan's latest book "Abraham Lincoln and Mexico - A history of courage, intrigue and unlikely friendships" Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Cover image of Dr. Michael Hogan's Abraham Lincoln and Mexico.
The United States and Mexico struggled through volatile years of suffering and carnage to become unified nations. Michael Hogan’s thoroughly researched and passionately written "Abraham Lincoln and Mexico" is a thought-provoking read that covers part of that struggle from 1822, when Americans settlers first arrived on Mexican territory, to 1867, when Mexico finally freed itself from France’s intrusion into its territory. With so much misleading information written about the Mexican-American War (between 1846 and 1848), lies repeated often enough gets sucked into people’s minds as truth, and the burden of proof rests on the lone voice that shouts, “The Emporer has no clothes.” The nineteenth century was a turbulent period in American and Mexican history. For anyone interested in Mexican-American history or how the game of politics is played, it’s an enlightening read. This is particularly true in light of the political landscape of both counrtries into 2017. read more

Mexico this month - January Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of January.

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Mexico this month - December Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of December. read more

Mexico this month - November Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of November.

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Mexico this month - October Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of October.

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Mexico this month - September Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of September.

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Mexico this month - August Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of August. read more

Mexico this month - July Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of July.

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Mexico this month - June Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of June.

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Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating? Donald W Miles

Ask about the history behind these celebrations, and a few may be able to tell you that the Mexicans defeated an invading French army on that date in 1862. Beyond that — except maybe in Puebla — general knowledge of the circumstances becomes sketchy. Why were the French there? What happened next? Did the French just go away? Many teachers in the U.S. still tell their classes that May fifth is Mexican Independence Day, which is dead wrong. read more

Our Lady of Guadalupe Luis Dumois

Virgin of Guadalupe - Tree of Life sculptures by Juan Hernández Arzaluz of Metepec.
Our Lady of Guadalupe has accompanied us in war and peace, in joy and grief, in life and death. She was the standard for Hidalgo and Morelos armies. She has been invoked and sought by us in times of despair and destruction, in times of serenity and reconstruction, then and now, as She will be tomorrow. I know that I can be a perfect Catholic and still not believe in Her. But I don't see how can anyone consider herself or himself truly a Mexican without trusting in the Lady from Heaven, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe. read more

Myth and History as described in the Mexican Codices Ronald A. Barnett ©

Aztec calendar stone
One of the problems encountered by historians and Mesoamerican scholars is the inextricable intermingling of myths and legends alongside what appear to be sober historical facts in many Mexican codices or painted books from the Valley of Mexico, Yucatan, and the Oaxaca area of southern Mexico. read more

Cinco de Mayo is more widely celebrated in USA than Mexico Tony Burton

US postage stamp commemorating Cinco de Mayo

Of the many battles fought on Mexican soil in the nineteenth century, only one — the Battle of Puebla, fought on May 5, 1862 — has given rise to a Mexican national holiday.

Why this one? The main reason is that the Battle of Puebla marks Mexico's only major military success since independence from Spain in 1821.

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Jocotepec blessed with one sharp historian Marvin West

Marsha kept her own horse, Marie-Elena, in the village. On this overcast day in summer 1966, she rode for miles along the shore. She bred Marie-Elena with a stallion from Jocotepec.
 
 
Photo in family collection of Marsha Sorensen; all rights reserved.
 
Aida exudes authenticity. She actually lives in Jocotepec. She was born there, last in a sizable flock of 13 children. Her father's family goes back to before the Spanish came calling. Her grandfather was shot during the Revolution. That is historic! read more

Mesoamerican epic poetry and saga: Universal elements Ronald A. Barnett ©

An Aztec musician poet from the Codex Borbonicus
The Aztecs formed a highly civilized society with poet-kings busily engaged in learned philosophical discussions. Unfortunately, the general public hears mostly about the Aztec practice of tearing out human hearts.

Prior to the Conquest, written documents in Roman transcription did not exist. The Aztecs handed down history and customs through an oral tradition backed up by codices — the "painted books" of ancient Mexico. It is true that the Aztecs did have a form of writing based on a combination of commonly recognized symbols (the Maya had an even more advanced form of phonetic symbolism). Nevertheless, written documents do imply a post-Conquest period of composition. This, in turn, raises the question of Spanish missionary influence on these apparently "native" compositions... read more

Touring Mexico by car in 1935 Alexander Kerekes

What was Mexico like in 1935? Alexander Kerekes discovered a 16 mm movie shot in 1935 during a road trip through Mexico. The beautiful Chrysler touring car tackles the roughest terrain through remote countryside, towns and cities, and even the capital. This is Mexico seen through the eyes of Americans... read more

The codices of ancient and colonial Mexico Ronald A. Barnett ©

Extract of page 2 of the Codex Colombino, depicting a Mesoamerican ballgame
How do we really know what happened in ancient Mexico before the arrival of the Spaniards and the introduction of writing? To get an idea how the Indians actually viewed these events we must turn to the pictorial and "written" manuscripts or codices produced by the people themselves. The codices themselves were generally in the form of long strips of native paper (amatl) or sized deerskin folded up into the shape of a moderate sized book, hence the name codex. Others were originally produced in book format. read more

On the trail of lost art works in Chihuahua Joseph A. Serbaroli, Jr.

Several years ago, I traveled to Chihuahua to find artworks that were painted by my grandfather, the artist Ettore Serbaroli (1881 - 1951). We brought along some old photographs of ceiling murals that we were looking to find. Instead, what we discovered was an entire chapel that Serbaroli decorated in 1910. On the other hand, the ceiling murals in our old brown photographs had eluded us.... read more

The Mexican Revolution 1910 Gaceta Consular

The Mexican Revolution was brought on by, among other factors, tremendous disagreement among the Mexican people over the dictatorship of President Porfirio Díaz, who, all told, stayed in office for th... read more

Western Mexico: A Traveler's Treasury, 4th edition James Tipton

Western Mexico, A Traveler's Treasury by Tony Burton
As Tony notes in his Introduction, this is "not intended to b a comprehensive guide to all the possible day trips and longer tours in the region…. Rather, it is a personal, idiosyncratic collection of my favorite places in Western Mexico…." The book is filled with whatever Tony finds fascinating… interesting and curious details of history and geography and geology and flora and fauna, and art and architecture and archaeology.... read more
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