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All articles for tag “history”
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Jocotepec blessed with one sharp historian Marvin West

Marsha kept her own horse, Marie-Elena, in the village. On this overcast day in summer 1966, she rode for miles along the shore. She bred Marie-Elena with a stallion from Jocotepec.
 
 
Photo in family collection of Marsha Sorensen; all rights reserved.
 
Aida exudes authenticity. She actually lives in Jocotepec. She was born there, last in a sizable flock of 13 children. Her father's family goes back to before the Spanish came calling. Her grandfather was shot during the Revolution. That is historic! read more

Mexico this month - April Tony Burton

Statue of Revolutionary hero Emiliano Zapata
© Julia Taylor 2007

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of April.

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Mexico this month - March Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of March. read more

Mexico this month - February Tony Burton

February 20, 1943 — A brand-new volcano, subsequently called Paricutín, erupts in a farmer’s field in Michoacan. It attracts world-wide attention. In succeeding years of eruption, two villages, Paricutin and San Juan Parangaricutirimícuaro are lost beneath the lava. Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of February.

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Mexico this month - January Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of January.

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Mesoamerican epic poetry and saga: Universal elements Ronald A. Barnett ©

An Aztec musician poet from the Codex Borbonicus
The Aztecs formed a highly civilized society with poet-kings busily engaged in learned philosophical discussions. Unfortunately, the general public hears mostly about the Aztec practice of tearing out human hearts.

Prior to the Conquest, written documents in Roman transcription did not exist. The Aztecs handed down history and customs through an oral tradition backed up by codices — the "painted books" of ancient Mexico. It is true that the Aztecs did have a form of writing based on a combination of commonly recognized symbols (the Maya had an even more advanced form of phonetic symbolism). Nevertheless, written documents do imply a post-Conquest period of composition. This, in turn, raises the question of Spanish missionary influence on these apparently "native" compositions... read more

Mexico this month - December Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of December. read more

Mexico this month - November Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of November.

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Mexico this month - October Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of October.

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Mexico this month - September Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of September.

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Mexico this month - August Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of August. read more

Mexico this month - July Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of July.

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Touring Mexico by car in 1935 Alexander Kerekes

What was Mexico like in 1935? Alexander Kerekes discovered a 16 mm movie shot in 1935 during a road trip through Mexico. The beautiful Chrysler touring car tackles the roughest terrain through remote countryside, towns and cities, and even the capital. This is Mexico seen through the eyes of Americans... read more

Mexico this month - June Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of June.

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Mexico this month - May Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of May.

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The codices of ancient and colonial Mexico Ronald A. Barnett ©

Extract of page 2 of the Codex Colombino, depicting a Mesoamerican ballgame
How do we really know what happened in ancient Mexico before the arrival of the Spaniards and the introduction of writing? To get an idea how the Indians actually viewed these events we must turn to the pictorial and "written" manuscripts or codices produced by the people themselves. The codices themselves were generally in the form of long strips of native paper (amatl) or sized deerskin folded up into the shape of a moderate sized book, hence the name codex. Others were originally produced in book format. read more

On the trail of lost art works in Chihuahua Joseph A. Serbaroli, Jr.

Several years ago, I traveled to Chihuahua to find artworks that were painted by my grandfather, the artist Ettore Serbaroli (1881 - 1951). We brought along some old photographs of ceiling murals that we were looking to find. Instead, what we discovered was an entire chapel that Serbaroli decorated in 1910. On the other hand, the ceiling murals in our old brown photographs had eluded us.... read more

The Mexican Revolution 1910 Gaceta Consular

The Mexican Revolution was brought on by, among other factors, tremendous disagreement among the Mexican people over the dictatorship of President Porfirio Díaz, who, all told, stayed in office for th... read more

Western Mexico: A Traveler's Treasury, 4th edition James Tipton

Western Mexico, A Traveler's Treasury by Tony Burton
As Tony notes in his Introduction, this is "not intended to b a comprehensive guide to all the possible day trips and longer tours in the region…. Rather, it is a personal, idiosyncratic collection of my favorite places in Western Mexico…." The book is filled with whatever Tony finds fascinating… interesting and curious details of history and geography and geology and flora and fauna, and art and architecture and archaeology.... read more

Playing for Pancho Villa Reviewed by James Tipton

Book cover-Playing for Pancho Villa
he year was 1916. Young Frank Holloway "got mercury poisoning working in the Silver Creek Mine in Mogollón, New Mexico." To recover his health, his doctor told him to get away and go have "an adventure."

And so… perhaps lacking judgment because of the mercury poisoning, Frank opted for danger as well as adventure. On Tosca, his beloved mare, he rode south, and fifty miles west of El Paso he crossed the border into Mexico.

Frank, "with a fool's luck, managed to pick his way… between horse thieves from both sides, the Texas rangers who pursued them, Pancho Villa's Dorados, General Pershing's 6,000 gringo troops who were chasing Villa after the raid at Columbus, New Mexico,... read more

An ancient Aztec betrayal Biblical style Ronald A. Barnett ©

Our knowledge of ancient Aztec civilization comes from many different sources: archaeology, codices or painted books, comparative ethnological studies and the like. But it is not until the advent of writing that a clear picture of past history begins to emerge.

That is not to say that historical accounts did not exist before the Conquest. read more

Did You Know? Cinco de Mayo is more widely celebrated in USA than Mexico Tony Burton

US postage stamp commemorating Cinco de Mayo
Of the many battles fought on Mexican soil in the nineteenth century, only one — the Battle of Puebla, fought on May 5, 1862 — has given rise to a Mexican national holiday.

Why this one? The main reason is that the Battle of Puebla marks Mexico's only major military success since independence from Spain in 1821.

On May 9, 1862, President Benito Juarez declared that the Cinco de Mayo, the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla, was to be a national holiday. In the U.S., the Cinco de Mayo has been transformed into a much more popular cultural event. read more

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating? Donald W Miles

Ask about the history behind these celebrations, and a few may be able to tell you that the Mexicans defeated an invading French army on that date in 1862. Beyond that — except maybe in Puebla — general knowledge of the circumstances becomes sketchy. Why were the French there? What happened next? Did the French just go away? Many teachers in the U.S. still tell their classes that May fifth is Mexican Independence Day, which is dead wrong. read more

The Dark Side of the Dream Kay Davis

For citizens of both the United States and Mexico, the Mexican-American border, as well as the matter of Mexican immigration are topics of current political dispute, thinly masking a cultural stigmatism that does not fit well with American history or ideals.

Since there have been times when Mexican immigration was sought, The Dark Side of the Dream becomes a very timely read.

It was largely Mexican labor in the fields that kept U.S. troops fed during both World Wars.

In The Dark Side of the Dream, Grattan — himself a mix of cultures with an Irish-American father and a Mexican mother — has given us a sense of real people grappling with everyday challenges... read more

Xtabentum: A Novel of Yucatan Reviewed by James Tipton

Xtabentum: A Novel of Yucatan begins in 1906, in those tense years just preceding the Mexican Revolution. A woman in Merida is giving birth to a baby girl, who will be named Amanda Diaz, and who will be one of the principal characters in Xtabentum.

The young Amanda, with the help of her thoughtful father, begins to understand la Casta Divina, the Divine Class, and how most members of this class "considered themselves superior by birth and the lighter color of their skin." read more
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