MexConnect
All results for tag “geography”
Showing 1—25 of 55 results

Viva Natura: The revival of a Mexican field guide classic David Kimball

Petr Myska probably didn't think that the book he was writing would be threatened with extinction even before some of the species that were featured in his publication. Myska's work was published in 2007 as A Field Guide to the Amphibians, Reptiles, Birds and Mammals of Western Mexico. In short form, it is known as "Viva Natura." Only 2000 copies were published... read more

Tehuantepec: Hold on to your sombrero Gerry Soroka

Wind farms in Tehuantepec, Mexico
The tehuano endlessly blows where North America stops. The tehuano, the unforgiving forever wind of the Isthmus of Tehauntepec, ceaselessly scours a path through the wide gap where the continent of North America ends and Central America starts. This narrow neck of land joining the Atlantic to the Pacific — once a candidate along with Panama for a deep sea canal — is about 35 miles from north to south. read more

Adventurous Mexico - exploring Mexico's outdoors - self-guided tours, mountains, volcanoes, hiking, camping, sailing, fishing, kayaking and more Index Page

 Climbing Mexican mountains, volcanoes and caves. Climbing Mexico's volcanoes Pico de Orizaba (Citlateptl) 5700m 18,700ft Popocatepl 5452m 17,887ft Iztaccihuatl 5286m 17,342ft ... read more

Alberto Turrent and Te-Amo: Six generations of Mexican cigars William B. Kaliher

Mexico's famous Te-Amo cigar comes from Sihuapan, near Catemaco, Veracruz. The producer — Turrent, Nueva Matacapan Tabacos, S.A. de C.V. — takes its name from the owner, Alberto Turrent, the fifth ... read more

The Magic Circle: Mexico's five ecosystems meet around Guadalajara John Pint

For a while I've been asking myself how it's possible that I keep finding new natural wonders to write about after 25 years of living near Guadalajara. So, one day I sat down with a map and drew a circ... read more

The incredible growth of Cancun, Mexico's leading tourist resort Richard Rhoda and Tony Burton

Relax in a beach chair in the shade of a thatch-roofed palapa and enjoy Cancun's exceptional beaches.
Mexico’s mass tourism industry in the past forty years has been dominated by large-scale, purpose-built developments partially funded by federal funds. In 1967, responding to bullish predictions of US demand for beach vacations, Mexico’s central bank identified the five best places for completely new, purpose-built tourist resorts. Top of the list, as part of a 30-year plan, was the uninhabited barrier island now known as Cancún. read more

Geo-Mexico: The Geography and Dynamics of Modern Mexico Reviewed by John Pint

Colima's Volcan de Fuego
Did you ever wonder why rain usually falls in the late afternoon or night during the summer in western Mexico? Can you figure out why the death rate for Mexicans is four times higher than for US-born workers in the southeastern USA? Do you know why "harmless" organic fertilizers washed into a lake can eventually kill every living thing in it? If you find these questions intriguing, you're going to want to own a copy of Geo-Mexico by Richard Rhoda and Tony Burton. read more

Female quality of life in Mexico Richard Rhoda and Tony Burton

Gender inequality is not an intangible aspect of life.

Mexico has never had a female head of state and has had very few female cabinet members.

The precise roles of women in Mexican society vary greatly from one region to another. More females are now enrolling in university courses, though the difference in rate between females and males is still pronounced. More women are seeking paid employment, and more are entering politics... read more

Water consumption in Mexico Richard Rhoda and Tony Burton

Lake Chapala
Though parts of northern Mexico are arid, the country as a whole receives an average of 760 mm of precipitation a year (slightly over 30 in). This is a considerable amount, more than that received by either Canada or the USA... read more

Mexico's place names and their meanings Tony Burton

I’ll break your jaw! (Chalco) In the umbilicus (Xico) Place of the squashed serpent (Coapatongo) [1] Mexico’s place names or toponyms provide a rich and fun source for linguistic analysis. In... read more

Las Piedras Bola: the great stone balls of Ahualulco John Pint

Approximately twenty-five years ago I heard rumors of some curious geological formations hidden high in the hills above the town of Ahualulco de Mercado, which is located about 58 kilometers west of Guadalajara, Mexico's second-largest city. "There are giant stone balls up there," I was told, "perfectly round and lying in a great bed of volcanic ash." When I asked how these megaspherulites (as scientists call them today) came into being, I was told that they had been shot into the air from inside Tequila Volcano. read more

Climbing volcanoes in Mexico Richard Ferguson

Climbers from the US and Canada looking for a new experience, and more altitude than they can find in the lower 48 states, can fly to Mexico City, and set a personal altitude record on the Mexican Volcanoes. This is a good warm-up trip for an attempt on a 20,000 ft peak in Alaska or South America. As a climber and a long-time fan of Mexico, here is my advice on climbing the Mexican volcanoes. read more

Did you know? The Green Revolution began in Mexico Tony Burton

Most people probably have a vague idea that the Green Revolution was something to do with improving crops in the developing world, but how many realize that it began in Mexico? In fact, the Green Revol... read more

Did you know? The first scientific account of Lake Chapala comes from 1839 Tony Burton

The first detailed scientific account of Lake Chapala was written by Henri Guillaume Galeotti. It was based on a visit to Chapala in February-March 1837. The article was published first in French in 18... read more

Did you know? 19th century Mexico map maker first sailor through the Georgia Strait, Canada Tony Burton

José María Narváez (1768-1840) is one of Mexico's forgotten heroes. Captain George Vancouver is usually given the credit for exploring the Georgia Strait and discovering the site of the city that n... read more

Did You Know? Blacks outnumbered Spaniards until after 1810 Tony Burton

By common consent, the history of blacks in Mexico is a long one. The first black slave to set foot in Mexico is thought to have been Juan Cortés. He accompanied the conquistadors in 1519. It has been... read more

Did You Know? Puerto Vallarta in Mexico will become an island and float away Tony Burton

Literary-minded travel writers describing Puerto Vallarta as an "island of tourist delights" probably don't realize that their words are closer to the truth than they might imagine. At present, Puerto ... read more

Did You Know? A fungus from Mexico and the Irish potato famine Tony Burton

There wouldn't be many Irish people in the United States if it wasn't for a Mexican fungus. The census of 1841 in Ireland recorded a population of about 8 million. This figure was a staggering 300% m... read more

Did You Know? January's weather in Mexico forecasts the rest of the year Tony Burton

Many Mexicans, especially campesinos, who are closer to the land than most, believe that the weather during the month of January serves as a long-range forecast for the entire year. The precise predict... read more

Did you know? Mexico has more than one geographic center Tony Burton

Mexico has more than one geographic center. I've often been asked, "Where's the center of Mexico?", and I've always deliberately fudged my reply, but is there a simple answer to this question? Well, p... read more

Did you know? Oaxaca is the most culturally diverse state in Mexico Tony Burton

The inter-census population count in Mexico in 2005 found that more than one million people in Oaxaca spoke at least one indigenous Indian language. Close behind came the state of Chiapas with about 95... read more
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