MexConnect
All results for tag “flora”
Showing 51—75 of 91 results

Allamanda, tulipan and zamia: ornamental plants and flowers of tropical Mexico Linda Abbott Trapp

Three beautiful options for your tropical garden in Mexico are the allamanda, tulipan and zamia. read more

Acalypha, anthurium and sago palm: ornamental plants and flowers of tropical Mexico Linda Abbott Trapp

Three beautiful options for your tropical garden in Mexico are the acalypha, anthurium and sago palm. read more

Gorgeous giants Linda Abbott Trapp

The next time you find yourself in a tropical or subtropical zone, take a closer look at some of the large and lovely foliage. One of the most delightful surprises of any tropical vacation is recogniz... read more

Nopales, tunas and pitayas Jeffrey R. Bacon

Spiny, tough and menacing, the cacti seem peculiar choices as culinary delights. Cacti are well known novelties among potted plant collectors and gardeners, and some cacti, such as nopales (the ... read more

Tropical blues: ornamental plants and flowers of tropical Mexico Linda Abbott Trapp

Blue can be compelling as the neon flash of a bird's wing, or quiet as a cloud, but it is never unnerving, always drawing the viewer to relax and witness its timeless grace. In music, blues are associ... read more

Henequen and its role in the Yucatan's shifting fortunes John McClelland

The Maya produced fibre from the henequen plant since the time of Christ. read more

Lloyd Mexico Economic Report - June 1999

CONTENTS: STOCK MARKET RECORDS NEW HIGH SLIM PICKINGS? TRIBASA-ENRON JOINT VENTURE ... read more

Enough water hyacinths, more than enough Marvin West

Ancient Chinese proverb say ox in ditch bad news. Really bad if your ox. Lirio (water hyacinths) on Lake Chapala, in the colorful state of Jalisco, in this magical country called Mexico, is bad news. ... read more

Seeing the forests and the trees links Ron Mader

Mexican forests cover more than 140 million hectares or about 72% of the national territory. That said, the trees are falling quickly. A recent government study of satellite images, the country is losi... read more

Did You Know? - Tobacco / Xigar Teresa Kendrick

Did you know that the word "cigar" originates from the Mayan word xigar? The word was used to describe the action of aspirating or sucking which later came to signify the act of smoking tobacco. T... read more

Did You Know? - Vanilla Teresa Kendrick

Did you know that the vanilla bean is from an aromatic orchid that originally came from Mexico? The Academy of Sciences and Gastronomic Arts in Paris were so taken with the fruit of this orchid, that ... read more

Did You Know? - Peanuts Teresa Kendrick

Did you know that the first people known to have used the peanut were the Mayans of Mexico? International explorers first recorded the peanut in Haiti, but were told it had originally been taken from ... read more

Did You Know? - Nochebuena / Poinsettia Teresa Kendrick

Nochebuena, the Mexican name of the flower English-speakers call poinsettia, was discovered in Taxco and the valleys surrounding Cuernavaca. Known by the Aztecs in their native Nahuatl language as cuet... read more

Did You Know? - Pineapples & Papaya Teresa Kendrick

Did you know that peanuts, vanilla, guavas, tomatoes, some forty different chiles, avocados, and papayas originally came from Mexico? Pineapple also grew wild in Mexico, as well as Peru and along the ... read more

Did You Know? - Castille Soap Teresa Kendrick

From the late 17th century and throughout the 18th, Castille soap was the reigning soap of Europe. It surpassed even the French soaps that, at their peak, were considered supremely prized elements of t... read more
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