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All results for tag “family”
Showing 1—25 of 73 results

Memories of Morelia: Tall buildings, Janitzio and a hamburger Enrique Garduño

I was nine years old the first time I visited Morelia, in 1973. I was living with my family in Xicotepec, a small town in the north of the State of Puebla. We spent our summer vacation that year with m... read more

Traveling with children to Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

The options are innumerable. It's simply a matter of doing a bit of homework - asking, and then committing yourself to a vacation dedicated in large part to your children. Oaxaca has traditionally bee... read more

Tracing Your Indigenous Roots in Mexico John P. Schmal

Because I volunteer a few days each month as a Mexican genealogical consultant at the Los Angeles Family History Center, many people have asked me for assistance in tracing their indigenous roots in Me... read more

Large families North and South of the border Jenny McGill

Families in Mexico tend to be numerous. I know about big families. I come from one. read more

Family tradition: five generations of mezcaleros in Matatlan, Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Don Isaac recounts awaking at 4 a.m. then walking from his village of Matatlán, with his mule, to Oaxac. He arrived some 14 or 15 hours later… just to buy a large cántaro, the traditiona... read more

Dress - A Matter Of Respect? Alvin Starkman

If expats want to be accepted into the broader society, then they must act the part and treat custom and societal standards with the respect they deserve. It's not enough to throw money at causes and d... read more

Where Divergent Religious Customs Merge: Death Of An Infant In Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Between the birth and the death came a crazy-quilt of only-in-Mexico experiences that resonated with my memories Daniel Pérez González was a beautiful baby. His parents Flor and Jo... read more

Hey Compadre Alvin Starkman

One day they may be calling you, so be ready and learn what it means read more

Anyone for bridge? William Farrar

"But I haven't played bridge since college." "The last time I played bridge, Ely Culbertson was the authority." "I've just been too busy earning a living to find time for Bridge." Sound familiar? We... read more

Michoacán's rural education Amanda Villagómez

Michoacán Index Gracias y Credits The State: State Map Introduction to Michoacán The Meseta Purepecha - Exploring Michoacán Alternative Tourism in Michoac... read more

Mexico flowers and flower art Ronald A. Barnett ©

3 flower pots
Flowers and flower arranging have played an important role in Mexico from ancient times to the present. The symbolic meaning of flowers is prominent throughout ancient Mesoamerican thought and practice. read more

The Guaymas Chronicles: La Mandadera by David E. Stuart Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Although it's about Mexico, this one starts off in Ecuador in the 1960s where the author was doing doctoral fieldwork for a dissertation on haciendas in that country. His work took him to a remote research station on the side of a mountain seventy miles from electricity, running water, telephones, etc. One day while riding his horse along the side of a gorge, with the bottom of a canyon almost a thousand feet below him, the horse stumbled and fell. On its way over the edge it rolled over Stuart and disappeared, leaving him badly crippled. He was rescued and eventually found his way to Guaymas, on the coast of the Sea of Cortez, in Mexico, where his fiancé, Iliana, lived. Thus begins the story of his recuperation and, at the same time, the exploration of Mexican society and customs which is described here. read more

The Salvation of La Purisima by T. M. Spooner Reviewed by Allan Cogan

The two cultures - Mexican and U.S. - come together in a thoughtful way in this interesting novel, which is set in both countries. The story concerns a group of Mexican illegal immigrants who travel north in May each year to work in the cherry orchards in northern Michigan. They are from the village of La Purísima in Michoacán. It's a community inhabited solely by elderly people and women and children during the picking season when all the men head north on what has become their annual rite of passage. It's perhaps more than that. read more

The Dark Side of the Dream by Alejandro Grattan-Dominguez Reviewed by Allan Cogan

The story begins in 1941, at the time America went to war with Japan and Germany. It concerns the Salazar family, poor farmers in Chihuahua. The grandfather, Sebastian, knows he is dying and he advises the family to move to the United States. He reasons that because of the war the Americans will want lots of people to work in their country as their men go off to fight. Their farm is a ruin. Only expensive fertilizer could bring it back to life. And they don't have any money. read more

Tortilla run: a day in Tijuana Alex Vinson

We woke at 7 a.m. to the blaring horn of the propane truck " beepbeeeeeepbeepbeeeeeeeeep " and wonder if he will ever buy a muffler for that dang truck. We dress quickly so that we can get to the ... read more

A day in the life of my mother-in-law by Alex Vinson Alex Vinson

Wake up about 6am. Verify today is the day that water is available (every 3rd day). Prop the front door open with a stick. Remove the carefully coiled garden hose from its storage place ... read more

Tienda del las dos estufas Alex Vinson

My suegra (mother-in-law) decided that she wanted to sell vegetables from her front porch in rural Guerrero. I asked her how much profit she would like to make and we would work the numbers back... read more

My neighbor the truck driver Alex Vinson

What was all that whirring and buzzing noise coming from downstairs? My new neighbor from Mexico City was spending a sunny Saturday polishing the fuel tank on his semi tractor. I introduced myself (a... read more

December in Mazamitla by Ralph Rodriguez with Alan Cogan Allan Cogan and Ralph Rodriguez

December 12th is a very important Catholic holiday in Mexico. It's the feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Mazamitla is a very small mountain town in Jalisco that celebrates the Virgin's feast day an annual nine-day festival. The final days, we were told, are the best. read more

Only Once in a Lifetime by Alejandro Grattan Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Here's a story that takes in a complete life, from childhood well into adulthood, and from rags to riches. It's a story that is of interest to we residents in the Lake Chapala area as it starts out in Ajijic and covers a fair number of years there - or should I say here. On page one we encounter ten-year-old Francisco Obregón, a homeless barefoot orphan outside the Old Posada on the Ajijic waterfront. It's 1940 and Francisco is hustling for odd jobs and tips. It's the only way he can manage to survive. read more

Breaking Even by Alejandro Grattan-Dominguez Reviewed by Allan Cogan

"What Val saw as his long period of involuntary servitude was about to come to an end. In the prison movie parlance he liked to affect, he had done his 'hard time.' He had finally reached his eighteenth birthday, and Texas law entitled him to make his own decisions now." The time is 1955. Val has just graduated from high school - although barely. He's finally free to escape the tiny Texas town of Big Bend, which he detests, and go off to California. Val's mother, Guadalupe, is Mexican and his father, who has long since flown the coop, is Anglo, which at least makes Val part Mexican. read more

Bilimbique: A Story From Mexico by Peggy Brown Balderrama Reviewed by Allan Cogan

One of the problems with reviewing this short but interesting novel is that the plot is based on a couple of surprises. To say too much about it would spoil the story. Once the action gets well underway the reader is presented with a surprising development involving one of the main characters. At that point the reader can even be forgiven for believing the story is essentially over. Read on however, and you'll find that Sra. Balderrama has another trick up her sleeve for the last chapter, a ploy that makes the experience of reading Bilimbique even more satisfying. read more

Caramelo by Sandra Cisneros Reviewed by Allan Cogan

The story mostly concerns three generations of a Mexican family, some of whom live in Mexico, others in the U.S. The action starts with three family groups making an annual pilgrimage from their homes in Chicago to visit other family members - like Awful Grandmother and Little Grandfather - in Mexico City. As they drive in three carloads down Route 66 one of the daughters, Lala, tells us about them - or at least some of them. read more

Living in Timucuy, Yucatan: birth, death and some in-between John G. Gladstein

The Setting Curanderismo The Inhabitants The Physical and Psychological Compadrazco The Beginning Love Is In the Air "I Do" The End of the Game Works Cited ... read more
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