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All results for tag “exploring-tourism”
Showing 26—50 of 1056 results

Riding off the Edge of the Map Reviewed by James Tipton

Riding off the Edge of the Map by David Bryen

Do you remember that best seller several decades ago, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, in which author Robert Pirsig details (but gets lost in digressions) a motorcycle trip from Wisconsin to California?

David Bryen's new book, Riding off the Edge of the Map, is a much better book, detailing (and reflecting upon) a far more fascinating motorcycle trip — through Mexico's Copper Canyon.

What began as a pleasure trip metamorphosed into something else: "The highway had deteriorated from asphalt to terror..."

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Isla Isabel, Mexico's answer to the Galapagos John Pint

Isla Isabel is located 34 kilometers (21 miles) off Mexico's west coast. It is a National Park and wildlife refuge with a population of some 42,000 birds and, in 2003, was named a World Heritage Site. ... read more

Mexico's San Felipe: A living desert museum Bruce F. Barber

San Felipe is the center of a living museum that has witnessed the passage of a continuum of men, women and children for the past 2- to 3,000 years. Whereas evidence of their existence remains in most ... read more

Lancandon Journal - 1969 Reviewed by James Tipton

In July of 1969, Bulgarian born artist-adventurer Dimitar Krustev, almost 50 years old, and his inexperienced young companion named Gary set off, in their folding kayak, to explore, traveling on its waters, the jungles of southern Chiapas, the still largely unknown land of the Lancandon Maya.

In 1969, this culture was already in decline, undermined by the relentless forces of what some still call progress.

Jungle adventures are always challenging. This trip was a very difficult one for Gary, his young companion, and although difficult as well for Krustev, the artist was generally of a calm and philosophically disposed spirit... read more

Cabo Corrientes: Beaches in Mexico with nobody there David Kimball

Cabo Corrientes is one of those vaguely heard of places where nobody ever goes because… well, where is it? And how and why would you go there? Literally, Cabo Corrientes means "cape currents." It's... read more

Mexico City's Xochimilco Canals Edythe Anstey Hanen

For anyone planning on spending time in Mexico City, the Xochimilco Canals (pronounced: so-chee-MIL-ko) is an experience not to be missed. After a first glance in any guide book, the traveller would be... read more

Shawls for all seasons, rebozos for all reasons Carron Harlan

We sit crushed together, moist and miserable, in the back of the battered old VW van as we do every day about this time. Interesting odors assail our noses. We would rather not know what it is we are s... read more

Chapultepec: Mexico City's urban forest Allan Wall

City parks were not an important part of my life when I was a child. I was raised in the country on a farm which, for all practical purposes, was a park. Growing older, though, I learned to appreciate ... read more

Busing it in Mexico: What's not to love? Christina Stobbs

I adore travelling Mexico by bus. Mexico's bus system offers travelers an economical, efficient and effective means to explore the entire country. The routes are highly organized and the connections a... read more

Mexico exploration: Jocotepec discovered Marvin West

This news bulletin just in: Mexico considers revising history books. Another holiday proposed. Famous explorer discovers Jocotepec! Okay, maybe not in the way Christopher Columbus did his thing. It ap... read more

La Candelaria In Tlacotalpan, Veracruz Janice Carraher

50 weeks out of the year Tlacotalpan sits in its torpid tropical slumber, but starting late January and running for two weeks it celebrates the Fiesta de la Candelaria. For most of these two weeks the Feria (fair) is made up of a carnival, bailes tropicales (salsa dances), and a very large tianguis (temporary market). Then – in stark contrast to its normal tranquility — on January 31st through February 2nd the town explodes into a religious and secular frenzy, its streets stuffed with true believers and joyful revelers. read more

Investing in Mexico: Risk or opportunity? Jeffrey Steele

Whether it's an exclusive, modern hotel on a beach, a boutique hostelry built into a 17th Century hacienda, or a simple bed-and-breakfast in a beguiling resort town, you're likely to find prices and packages more affordable these days.

Mexico is always less costly for Americans, given its proximity to the U.S., but fits budgets even better today, given the recent publicity it has unfairly endured.

What's true of hotels is also likely to be true of airfare, restaurant meals, tour plans and all-inclusive deals. For a holiday that's truly easy on the wallet, there may never have been a better time to consider Mexico than right now. read more

The Mango Orchard: The Extraordinary True Story of Family Lost and Found Reviewed by James Tipton

All of his life, Bayley had listened to the stories told to him by his beloved grandmother, stories that usually were about her father, Bayley's great-grandfather Arturo (Arthur Greenhalgh, born 1874 in Tottington, England) who managed a cotton mill in western Mexico in those challenging years immediately preceding the Mexican Revolution.

Worried about life passing him by, in 1898 Arturo "kissed his sweetheart Mariah goodbye and set off on his Mexican adventures."

Bayley, over one-hundred years later, "was plagued by the same fear about life passing me by." read more

Christmas in Mexico City Edythe Anstey Hanen

The flash of skate blades against gleaming ice. A cold-edged wind that creeps into your bones. The sharp, metallic smell of snow in the air. Winter. These are the images that most of us connect to our... read more

Mexico lives! Cheers for Mexico Marvin West

Our Lady of Sorrows church in Dolores Hidalgo
Come see and taste and smell. Have fun. Soak up some sunshine. Learn something. Visit a historic hacienda or maybe Pueblos Mágicos — or even a wind farm. Enjoy fresh fruit, veggies, flowers and tacos. Sing along with the mariachis in the big city, tour museums and cathedrals, pose beside monuments, dine at famous restaurants, relax and watch the plaza multitude. read more

Culinary festival on Mexico's Maya Riviera: A feast of a fest Jeffrey Steele

Beach in Cancun, Mexico
Start with an endless array of fabulous dishes from the greatest chefs in the Americas. Add a lavish serving of wines born in regions from Napa Valley to the fields of Chile. Sprinkle with warm, sun-splashed days, beckoning beaches and spirited nightlife. The result: The tempting event called the Cancun-Riviera Maya Wine & Food Festival, staged in Quintana Roo, Mexico. read more

Mexico City's Palacio de Bellas Artes Anthony Wright

While perfect storms have been ravaging parts of America north of the Mexican border, Mexico itself — and especially Mexico City — is currently enjoying idyllic weather, a veritable Indian summer a... read more
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