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All results for tag “culture-customs”
Showing 26—50 of 533 results

Radiant radishes: La Noche de Rabanos in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

For one night of the year in Oaxaca, Mexico, the Raphanus sativus, or radish as it is more commonly known, escapes its destiny as root vegetable side dish and becomes art. Thousands upon thousands of r... read more

Mexico's Christmas traditions: Posadas, pastorelas and nacimientos Judy King

Few North Americans recognize that the roots of these treasured “Christmas” traditions were active long before the birth of Christ. In fact, most evolved from pagan winter solstice rituals of the Celts, Druids, Scandinavians and indigenous groups, and the much older Jewish Festival of Lights.

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Our Lady of the Rosary, beloved patroness of Talpa de Allende Jenny McGill

October 7 is considered the birthday of Nuestra Señora del Rosario (the Virgin of Talpa). The six o'clock morning mass is dedicated to the Virgin, then she begins to receive her well-wishers. This is a very organized neighborhood-by-neighborhood pilgrimage to the church. Every pilgrim has a gift in hand. By 5 o'clock the holy carpet is ready, church bells begin to chime, and The Lady walks. read more

Guadalajara 19th International Mariachi Festival: August 27 - September 12, 2014 Mexconnect Staff

The mariachi is believed to have originated in Jalisco, in the area of Cocula and Tecolitlan.

So it is fitting that the capital of Jalisco celebrate this quintessential musical tradition, and the annual International Mariachi Festival — begun in 1994 — brings together groups from all over the world.

The National Charro Championship runs concurrently.

¡Viva México en Guadalajara! read more

Reflections on el Dia de Las Madres: the mother of Mexican fiestas Dale Hoyt Palfrey

The brassy blast of a trumpet rips me from the comforting embrace of Morpheus. As the familiar strains of Las Mañanitas register in the fuzzy workings of my brain, I roll over and open one eye to... read more

The food of Easter in Mexico: a seasonal celebration of popular cuisine Karen Hursh Graber

A myriad of fresh fruit will become juices and agua fresca, a refreshing drink populare throughout Mexico.
© Christina Stobbs, 2011
Semana Santa — Holy Week — is the observance of a solemn religious occasion. But the mood in most of Mexico during Easter time is far from solemn. With the exception of the Good Friday passion plays and processions, the atmosphere is festive, with people taking to the streets and beaches to celebrate spring and rebirth. read more

Reborn in the temazcal: A traditional native Mexican American purification ceremony Jeffrey R. Bacon

We sit in darkness, on an earthen floor. Hot vapor condenses and drips down my skin as I hug my knees against my chest and breathe lightly to cool the scalding vapor before it reaches my lungs. The bea... read more

A Mexican Christmas dinner: tamales, turkey, tejocotes Karen Hursh Graber

Piñata<br>© Maria Elena, 1999
The usually bustling Mexican markets become even more so in December, when the mountains of fruit for ponche navideño (Christmas punch) compete with a wild array of tinsel-y decorations for shoppers' attention, and the excitement leading to the posadas and pastorelas builds up. The culmination of all this preparation is, of course, Noche Buena — Christmas Eve — when one of the most festive dinners of the year is served. A Mexican Christmas dinner is abundant and varied, with foods that range from tamales to turkey and tejocote. read more

Mexican posadas and a famous Christmas carol Jenny McGill

Christmas posada<br>© Dale Hoyt Palfrey, 1996
Beginning on December 16, Mexican children have their nine days of posadas before Christmas. Two are chosen to dress up like Joseph and Mary and lead the other neighborhood children from house to house singing a request for a place to rest. There are singers inside the houses they pass who are programmed to sing a refusal of lodging. Finally, they arrive at a house where they are received and refreshments are served. read more

Day of the Dead: Honoring our grandmother, Jesusita Yvette Marquez-Sharpnack and Veronica Gonzalez-Smith

What is Dia de los Muertos or the Day of the Dead? Día de los Muertos is a time to honor and celebrate deceased loved ones. The celebration occurs on November 2 in connection with All Soul's Day. Unli... read more

My journey with La Calaca: a Day of the Dead experience Bill Begalke

An opalescent sky muted the harshness of the emerald earth as the old car struggled up the rock-filled Mexican road, leaving the breeze blown coast behind. I had begun a journey deep into the verdant m... read more

Through the lens: Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Geri Anderson

Day of the Dead, one of the most important celebrations in Mexico, is understandably difficult for foreigners to fully comprehend. Cemeteries full of families, flowers, food, and music seem daunting to... read more

Arts and Culture of Mexico - Index Page Index Page

Within this section we highlight some of the best Mexico has to offer in the way of artesans, writers, painters, ceramicists, cultural examples, sculptors and more. If you like what you see, contact the artists and let them know you saw it on MexConnect. read more

Saint Anthony and John the Baptist: June festivals at Lake Chapala Judy King

Church dedicated to Saint Anthony of Padua in San Antonio Tlayacapan, Mexico.
© Taner Sirin, 2011
During June, we investigate the history, lives and legends of Saint Anthony of Padua, the beloved patron saint of San Antonio Tlayacapan and San Juan Cosala's Saint John the Baptist as these communities on Mexico's Chapala lakeshore focus for nine days on processions, masses, sky rockets and devotions. Each community will begin each of the nine days preceding their Saint's Day with early morning firecrackers to awaken the village for the morning pilgrimage to mass... read more

Ethnic diversity in Mexico Index Page

Mexico is an ethnically diverse country. To understand México, one must understand her peoples, their history and contributions to what is the México of today. Within this section, we consider those ... read more

The Religious Virgins and Saints of Mexico: las Virgenes y santos de Mexico Index Page

An Index Page of Articles, Images and Resources.

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Mexico's Huichol resource page: their culture, symbolism, art Mexconnect Staff

Our guide to the Huichol people of Mexico: their culture, history and extraordinary art read more

Silver, saints, and sinners™: Semana Santa in Taxco, Mexico Jim Allen and Jan McHargue

The City of Silver If you have heard of the picturesque, old colonial Mexican town of Taxco at all, you probably associate it with that precious metal so characteristic of Mexico – silver. If you... read more

Dancing with the Stars: Carnival on Cozumel David Hammer

As a wave of dancers flooded the street, the beat of the salsa flowed through my body. My feet moved and my shoulders shimmied. A beautiful dancer, wearing an off-the-shoulder dress leaned toward me an... read more

Uncovering Tonala's history at the National Ceramic Museum Erin Cassin

Dating back to pre-Hispanic times, the nahual is a shape shifter who switches between human and animal forms and is often characterized as a shaman. read more

Mexico's Dia de Muertos celebration: Is it dying? Yuri Awanohara

"Every year there are more and more tourists. They're not coming to see our tradition, they just want another reason to have a fiesta. It gets worse later, when they start urinating on the candles."

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