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All results for tag “culture-customs”
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Guelaguetza Maria Diaz

Monday, July 21, 2014, the colorful pageantry of Mexico's Guelaguetza is reenacted once again during the Lunes del Cerro (Mondays on the Hill. A Zapotec word signifying offering or offertory, Guelaguetza was the term used to describe the Oaxaca ceremony and celebration held each year to propitiate the gods in return for sufficient rain and a bountiful harvest. Today it is one of the most colorful fiestas in Mexico. read more

Mexico this month - July Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of July.

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Night of the altars in San Miguel de Allende Edythe Anstey Hanen

It is late afternoon in Mexico, two days before Palm Sunday, and it is the day that honours Nuestra Señora de los Dolores — Our Lady of Sorrows. All over town, San Miguel de Allende's families and b... read more

Lenten traditions in Oaxaca: Our Lady of Sorrows Tara Lowry

A life-sized Virgin Mary statue with imploring, heaven-raised eyes welcomed me into the courtyard of my favourite café in Oaxaca, Mexico. Dozens of what looked to me to be chia pets surrounded her. Wh... read more

Dressing Baby Jesus: Dia de la Candelaria in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

All around town, people are carrying babies. It takes me a moment to realize, (mostly because they are swaddled in blankets) that they are not real babies but dolls. Then it takes me another moment and... read more

Mexico this month - January Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of January.

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Did you know? The Thanksgiving and Christmas turkey originated in Mexico. Tony Burton

Strange but true; the bird now so closely associated with many festive meals is a direct descendant of the wild turkeys still found in many parts of Mexico. How is it possible that a Mexican bird acquired the name turkey?

The first use in English of the word "turkey" to describe the bird dates back to 1555. By 1575 , turkey was already becoming the preferred main course for Christmas dinner. Curiously, the Turkish name for the turkey is hindi, which is probably derived from "chicken of India", perhaps based on the then-common misconception that Columbus had reached the Indies... read more

Chapala's Feria Maestros del Arte: guardians of the folk art tradition Erin Cassin

"Art is a country's history and, before Mexicans could read or write, they were telling stories through their art. If this art disappears, so does history." read more

Did You Know? Cinco de Mayo is more widely celebrated in USA than Mexico Tony Burton

US postage stamp commemorating Cinco de Mayo
Of the many battles fought on Mexican soil in the nineteenth century, only one — the Battle of Puebla, fought on May 5, 1862 — has given rise to a Mexican national holiday.

Why this one? The main reason is that the Battle of Puebla marks Mexico's only major military success since independence from Spain in 1821.

On May 9, 1862, President Benito Juarez declared that the Cinco de Mayo, the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla, was to be a national holiday. In the U.S., the Cinco de Mayo has been transformed into a much more popular cultural event. read more

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating? Donald W Miles

Ask about the history behind these celebrations, and a few may be able to tell you that the Mexicans defeated an invading French army on that date in 1862. Beyond that — except maybe in Puebla — general knowledge of the circumstances becomes sketchy. Why were the French there? What happened next? Did the French just go away? Many teachers in the U.S. still tell their classes that May fifth is Mexican Independence Day, which is dead wrong. read more

Shawls for all seasons, rebozos for all reasons Carron Harlan

We sit crushed together, moist and miserable, in the back of the battered old VW van as we do every day about this time. Interesting odors assail our noses. We would rather not know what it is we are s... read more

Easter in San Miguel de Allende: Our Lord of the Column Edythe Anstey Hanen

The church bells have been tolling most of the night, interrupted only intermittently by the blast of rockets soaring into the night sky. One resounding boom echoes throughout the city at midnight. Thi... read more

Mexico's lucha libre: Street art in a Coyoacan museum Anthony Wright

A new exhibit running through January at the Museo de las Culturas Populares in Coyoacan, Mexico City, celebrates the "wow" factor of the wrestling phenomenon known the world over as lucha libre (free ... read more

Radiant radishes: La Noche de Rabanos in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

For one night of the year in Oaxaca, Mexico, the Raphanus sativus, or radish as it is more commonly known, escapes its destiny as root vegetable side dish and becomes art. Thousands upon thousands of r... read more

Mexico's Christmas traditions: Posadas, pastorelas and nacimientos Judy King

Few North Americans recognize that the roots of these treasured “Christmas” traditions were active long before the birth of Christ. In fact, most evolved from pagan winter solstice rituals of the Celts, Druids, Scandinavians and indigenous groups, and the much older Jewish Festival of Lights.

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Our Lady of the Rosary, beloved patroness of Talpa de Allende Jenny McGill

October 7 is considered the birthday of Nuestra Señora del Rosario (the Virgin of Talpa). The six o'clock morning mass is dedicated to the Virgin, then she begins to receive her well-wishers. This is a very organized neighborhood-by-neighborhood pilgrimage to the church. Every pilgrim has a gift in hand. By 5 o'clock the holy carpet is ready, church bells begin to chime, and The Lady walks. read more

Guadalajara 19th International Mariachi Festival: August 27 - September 12, 2012 Mexconnect Staff

The mariachi is believed to have originated in Jalisco, in the area of Cocula and Tecolitlan.

So it is fitting that the capital of Jalisco celebrate this quintessential musical tradition, and the annual International Mariachi Festival — begun in 1994 — brings together groups from all over the world.

The National Charro Championship runs concurrently.

¡Viva México en Guadalajara! read more

Reflections on el Dia de Las Madres: the mother of Mexican fiestas Dale Hoyt Palfrey

The brassy blast of a trumpet rips me from the comforting embrace of Morpheus. As the familiar strains of Las Mañanitas register in the fuzzy workings of my brain, I roll over and open one eye to... read more

The food of Easter in Mexico: a seasonal celebration of popular cuisine Karen Hursh Graber

A myriad of fresh fruit will become juices and agua fresca, a refreshing drink populare throughout Mexico.
© Christina Stobbs, 2011
Semana Santa — Holy Week — is the observance of a solemn religious occasion. But the mood in most of Mexico during Easter time is far from solemn. With the exception of the Good Friday passion plays and processions, the atmosphere is festive, with people taking to the streets and beaches to celebrate spring and rebirth. read more
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