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All results for tag “adjusting”
Showing 1—17 of 17 results

San Miguel de Allende: A Place in the Heart - Expatriates Find Themselves Living in Mexico Reviewed by James Tipton

John Scherber's thoughtful and satisfying book, San Miguel de Allende: A Place in the Heart (2010), is a collection of stories about North Americans "who live here full time, as I do." San Miguel de Allende is their home.

The idea of the book originated when Scherber, after living in San Miguel for only eight months, began asking himself questions like: "What had I given up to come here, and what had I gained? What was my new role in the community? Was I an exile? An expatriate? Would I ever live in the States again? How did I react to Americans I saw here visiting? What had I done?" read more

An expatriate in Mexico John Scherber

Being an expatriate has nothing to do with a lack of patriotism, it merely means a person who lives in a country he wasn't born in.

You must be thinking of ex-patriot; someone who's turned against his country. It's a different spelling, like here and hear.

Usually the reasons are about experiencing a new culture and a different kind of weather, as they were for me. And they're always about reinventing yourself against a background that in Mexico I think of as simpático. It welcomes people in a mood for a lifestyle change.

But how does it work, really? read more

Volunteers get involved on Mexico's Nayarit Riviera Christina Stobbs

Yes, Mexico is beautiful! Whether you plan to enjoy a vacation or the experience of living in Mexico, you'll find it to be an enriching life experience where one is immersed in a warm, vibrant and welc... read more

The Best How-To Book on Moving to Mexico Reviewed by James Tipton

The Best How-To Book on Moving to Mexico is written by three people who have made the move. Carol Schmidt and Norma Hair moved to San Miguel de Allende in May of 2002. The third editor, Rollins "Rolly" Brook, "after visiting all 50 states in the USA and many countries around the world… found himself most at home in Mexico." In 2000 Rolly retired to Lerdo, Durango. Clearly this is no trio on extended vacation. They actually live here… permanently. These authors are bold and direct and the book is divided into four parts. Hats off to Carol, Norma, and Rolly! This just might be that best book. read more

Did You Know? Different traffic whistles in Mexico mean different things Tony Burton

Mayhem prevails in many Mexican cities during rush hours. The traffic in some big cities rarely seems to let up, or slow down, as vehicles jockey for the best position before becoming ensnarled in a ta... read more

Agave Marias: Border Crossers, Boundary Breakers by the Lake Chapala Women Writers Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Here's an unusual volume with ten individual authors, each of whom is independent of the other nine except for the fact they all reside - either full or part-time - in the Lake Chapala area of Mexico. Their book consists of some 45 or more pieces of fiction and non-fiction plus a poem or three. The non-fiction includes travel tales, accounts of significant events in the authors' past lives, recollections of interesting people and other offbeat memoirs and anecdotes. read more

Personality and Adjustment - The Foreign Executive in Mexico Dr. Marc J. Ehrlich

During the 16 years that I have been living in Mexico, I have worked with many International families. They were in our great city mostly as a result of the husband's work transfer. My contact with the... read more

Mexico - The Social Perspective Dr. Marc J. Ehrlich

Introduction One of the ways to soften personality shock is knowing what to expect from the Mexican. In this chapter special attention will he placed on helping the foreign executive understand the ge... read more

Mexico Magic by Dru Pearson Reviewed by Allan Cogan

.Dru Pearson begins her account of her first four seasons in Ajijic starting in the summer of 2000 when she loaded or, rather, overloaded her VW van with as many belongings as it would hold, and she and her dog, Bailey, drove (slowly, she emphasizes) to Laredo. However, before she even reached the U.S./ Mexico border, the vehicle broke down and she found herself by the roadside in 110 degree temperatures, unloading twelve boxes of belongings, plus a TV, a computer complete with monitor and printer and other sundry items. However, a mechanic answered her call and the car was repaired and she made it across the border at Laredo, starting the 750 mile stretch to Ajijic on the shores of Lake Chapala. read more

Live Well in Mexico Reviewed by Allan Cogan

What Luboff has set out here is all the basic information one needs on a host of topics relevant to moving to Mexico. You'll find details on acquiring residency documents, whether or not to buy or rent a house, working in Mexico, how to bring your car here, how to move your furniture here and so on. You’ll also find hints and tips on staying healthy, dining out, hiring help, what to bring on your first trip, road safety, the best ways to get from one place to another and much, much more. Indeed, there is hardly a page that doesn’t have some useful hint or tip on living here successfully. read more

The People's Guide to Mexico, 25th Anniversary Edition Reviewed by Allan Cogan

“This book is about Mexico - about living, travelling and taking things as they come in a foreign country. It’s about driving conditions and health and how to cross the border. It’s about drinking the water without getting sick… It’s not about which hotels to stay in or the most interesting villages to visit. The purpose of the book is to teach you how to find out those things for yourself.” read more

Surviving a highway accident in Mexico Allan Cogan

This was intended to be a straightforward article on driving to Nogales from Guadalajara and back, with information on tolls, distances, hotels, restaurants, etc. However, a young Chicano in a brand new truck changed all that on our return journey. Hence, the use of the word "accident" in the title of this piece. Our little escapade has been a salutory learning experience and perhaps I can pass on a few things we learned to people who might face similar difficulties some day. read more

Mexicans are some of the nicest people I’ve ever met Allan Cogan

While I’m perfectly aware that this country has more than its share of bad people, I have to say after four years here that some of the nicest people I’ve ever met are Mexicans. read more

Adjusting to Mexico: Transitional anxiety - Part 3, an overview Dr. Marc J. Ehrlich

During the time that I have been living in Mexico, I have worked with many international families. They were in Mexico City mostly as a result of the husband's work transfer. The contact with these families, however, usually came as a result of their need for help.

read more

Adjusting to Mexico: Transitional anxiety and interpersonal effects - Part 2 Dr. Marc J. Ehrlich

Moving to a foreign country makes enormous demands upon our psyche. Not only do we have to deal with the stress of leaving home, we also have to struggle to find the way to live within a country whose culture, society, and language are so different from our own. For some, this double challenge can become overwhelming and lead to a variety of psychological and emotional reactions.

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Adjusting to Mexico: Transitional anxiety and interpersonal effects - Part 1 Dr. Marc J. Ehrlich

As many international families can attest, adjusting to life in Mexico City or other major city in Mexico is a unique challenge. Some families, unfortunately, do not fare too well. In this article, som... read more
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