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Gays in Mexico Discussion Thread Forum

I am gay and thinking of moving to Mexico. I would like to know what attitudes are like towards gays in Mexico. Also, I heard that there San Miguel de Allende has a "gay community". Is that true? Is San Miguel more accepting of gays than other places? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

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A Discussion about immigration Discussion Thread Forum

My sister in Morelia just finished getting her FM-3 in San Miguel de Allende this week, and she ís given me the latest report: read more

Secret places in Mexico Marvin West

Tarahumana
Ojo de Lago 1997
As a child, I sometimes read comic books for entertainment. I did not believe in flying dragons but they certainly stimulated the imagination. As an old-timer, older than dirt, I read travel writers just for fun. I do believe some write at great length about Mexico without ever visiting. Case in point: Smarter Travel magazine had a headline about Mexico secret places. That got my undivided attention. "Ready to discover the real Mexico? If you haven't yet ventured beyond the mega resorts and Senor Frog franchises, here's help. In these 10 cities, undiscovered by most American travelers, you'll see another side of Mexico." The thought of learning about 10 places “undiscovered by most American travelers” was exciting. For many years we have traveled widely but, unlike the Hank Snow long-ago song, we have not been everywhere. read more

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in Mexico "Mexico" Mike Nelson

You'll find AA throughout Mexico, even in small towns. NA has a sizable presence in the larger towns. Alanon is almost everywhere. OA, SALA and other programs are less likely to be encountered outside major cities. AA is very visible. I have noted where there are meetings in many cases, but like here, they move or change. We urge readers to help us keep this list current.

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Sliced Iguana: Travels in Unknown Mexico by Isabella Tree Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Isabella Tree tells about her solitary travels to various parts of Mexico. Is this becoming a sort of literary sub-category - single ladies taking on the world? This book largely consists of a half dozen essays covering specific geographic areas that Ms. Tree visited, including Mexico City, Chiapas and Lake Pátzcuaro. My own personal favorite was "Holy Week," the one on San Miguel de Allende. read more

The Zone of Silence in Northern Mexico: scientific marvel or just fiction? Andrea Kaus

The MapimI Reserve overlaps an area known as La Zona del Silencio (the Zone of Silence) which attracts tourists and curiousity-seekers from all over the world. These people and their guides are locally referred to as zoneros or silenciosos. They are generally considered to be slightly daft or a nuisance, but they represent a substantial population of strangers who wish to see, experience, and take away with them read more

San Luis Potosi: a brief overview Geri Anderson

Situated about 300 miles north of Mexico City at an elevation of 6,200 feet, San Luis Potosi doesn't suffer the high summer temperatures and humidity of coastal areas. Although it's out of the Colonial Circle of cities such as San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Morelia, and Patzcuro, SLP, too, is rich with colonial architecture and history.

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The Through Line: A Journey from Darkness into Life Reviewed by James Tipton

Popular Ajijic photographer Jay Koppelman has two things to celebrate this winter: one, the recent opening of Studio 18, on Colón 18 in Ajijic, which features exclusively his photographs; and two, the recent publication of the first collection of his Mexico photographs, in a handsome coffee-table format, The Through Line. read more

Building houses for Mexico's less fortunate John Scherber

For some northerners, heading south of the border to live after a busy career, Mexico looks like the land of mañana. All they have to do is kick back and watch the monarch butterflies pass on their an... read more

The Devil's Workshop James Tipton

The story begins as Mark Sands, a successful money manager — after little people with grubby hands drug him and drop him over the parapet of his broad veranda — is falling twenty-seven floors to his death.

Feeling detached, perhaps defensively, from his plummeting body, Sands wonders, "How had the little people emerged from the painting over his buffet?

It was his Rafael Cantú masterpiece, The Last Supper, the prize of his collection. And they were the characters from the painting. He recognized the odd, ragged leather outfits.

Had he been murdered by these nightmare versions of Christ and the Apostles?" ... read more

Nothing to Declare by Mary Morris Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Mary Morris is an intrepid and courageous lady. She was living in San Miguel de Allende in Mexico, in the Mexican part of town, when she decided to take off on her exploration of Central America. The trip took her to countries such as Bolivia, Guatemala, Honduras and San Salvador. Just about all of the transit was on local buses and very little of it seemed to be very tightly planned. Most of the time she seemed to be traveling the back roads. read more

Approaching the Cosmos... Hotel: Travelling the World with a Gay Sensibility by Robert Champ Reviewed by Allan Cogan

This is a book of travel essays by a man who certainly has covered the world. I've chosen to review it here because so many of the pieces are concerned with places in Mexico, such as Oaxaca, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico City and Guanajuato as well as my own familiar territory here in Ajijic and the Lake Chapala area. Other locations include Russia, China, Ireland, Paris, the French Riviera and some U.S. cities. In fact, for me one of the most interesting articles was about the author's running away from home in Kansas City with another boy and hitchhiking to San Diego. read more

Mineral de Pozos: a Mexican ghost town reawakens

Nestled between the hills and clouds at 7,500 ft. above sea level and only 25 miles from San Miguel Allende, is Pozos, Guanajuato. This once opulent colonial city lived through several gold bonanzas ... read more

100 Love Sonnets Reviewed by James Tipton

"Well," you might be asking, "just what does a book titled 100 Love Sonnets have to do with Mexico?" "A lot," I might answer, "because this is a collection 100 sonnets, the first 50 of which were written after the break-up of a fifteen-year marriage" and include fantasies of a future relationship.

The final 50 were written after the author meets Gioia in San Miguel de Allende. They become lovers and "The second half of the sonnets, from 51 on, were inspired by and written for her."

Both halves, though, are about extraordinary women. read more

Sacred places around us: Is Talpa a "power place"? Jenny McGill

 The Virgin of Talpa and her church by Guy Garber Guerrero
Quite by accident, I recently ran across a website that lists Talpa de Allende as a sacred power place. Martin Gray spent years visiting and photographing every place he heard was a sacred site, and one of his pilgrimages brought him to Mexico. Apparently, there are different types of sacred sites. Martin classifies Talpa as "miracle-work site." read more

Mexconnect reaches around the world Jenny McGill

I'm constantly amazed how far Mexconnect reaches out -- from little Talpa de Allende, Jalisco, to the direct descendant of a Nobel winner in Germany. read more

An orphan's Christmas in Oaxaco Stan Gotlieb

Expatriates, especially "older" folks, are often without families. Those with families "back there" can get a little wistful during the Holidays, too. (Pictured is a Day of the Dead figure of wire, pap... read more

Mexico And Minimum Wage Discussion Thread Forum

We fear that if everyone who goes to Mexico is in the position to have multiple homes in various countries, not batting an eye at paying N. American prices for everything and anything, soon they will be the only ones that can afford Mexico. read more

Geo-Mexico: The Geography and Dynamics of Modern Mexico Reviewed by John Pint

Colima's Volcan de Fuego
Did you ever wonder why rain usually falls in the late afternoon or night during the summer in western Mexico? Can you figure out why the death rate for Mexicans is four times higher than for US-born workers in the southeastern USA? Do you know why "harmless" organic fertilizers washed into a lake can eventually kill every living thing in it? If you find these questions intriguing, you're going to want to own a copy of Geo-Mexico by Richard Rhoda and Tony Burton. read more

Road Trip: Mexico Discussion Thread Forum

Mexico City, Querétaro, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Morelia, Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta Posted by Bill on Mayo 12, 2000 Some of you might find the following article interesting in whic... read more

Camino de Guanajuato Allan Wall

Guanajuato City’s colonial downtown, constructed centuries ago, resembles that of old Spain. In colonial times, the mines here were producing a significant part of the world’s silver production. It was the silver that financed the massive building projects which included churches, and the massive Alhondiga. This latter building, built at the end of the colonial period as a corn storage facility, was soon used as a fort, later served as a prison, and is now a museum. read more

Guanajuato: Journey to the center of the universe Bill Begalke

The most important visual image in the classic film, " Close Encounters of the Third Kind," was not the alien spaceship, but the imposing stone monolith chosen as the site of the encounter. In an att... read more
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