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Immigrant cooking in Mexico: The Mennonite kitchens of Chihuahua Karen Hursh Graber

In recent years, immigration has become a topic of intense focus, not only in the United States and Mexico, but worldwide. Although generally seen as a political question, there is no doubt that the mo... read more

Mexico this month - November Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of November.

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Mexico's Day of the Dead - resource page Index Page

Fresh flowers are sold everywhere for 50 cents a bunch
Day of the Dead in Mexico or Dia de los Muertos is celebrated throughout Mexico. Her face is unforgettable and she goes by many names: La Catrina (Fancy Lady), La Flaca (Skinny), La Huesuda (Bony), La Pelona (Baldy). A fixture in Mexican society, she's not some trendy fashion model, but La Muerte — Death. El Dia is a day of celebration with deep spiritual connections to the souls who gone before yet through family rituals remain connected to this reality. read more

Mexico this month - October Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of October.

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Artist Richard Hay Reagan (1929-2012) first visited Mexico in the 1950s Tony Burton

In the mid-1950s, after temporary jobs in California, Rick sought artistic inspiration in Mexico. He used GI Bill funds (then about $110 a month) to study art at Mexico City College, where he also taught and exhibited. More than once he spent time painting in the small fishing village of La Ventosa, in Oaxaca. read more

Artist Richard Hay Reagan (1929-2012) revisted Mexico in 1970 Tony Burton

Richard Reagan undoubtedly had artistic talent, but despite his creativity and enviable work ethic, he always lived in the moment and never planned ahead. This makes it all the more important that this quietly-spoken "true artist", one who was never willing to compromise his artistic integrity, is not forgotten. read more

Mexico this month - September Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of September.

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The chiles of summer: Pick a peck of poblanos Karen Hursh Graber

Poblano chile peppers
Characterized by the thick skin which makes them ideal for stuffing, poblanos were being used in the cuisine of Puebla when the Spaniards arrived in the 16th century. Puebla nuns of the Colonial era created famous chiles en nogada, considered Mexico's national dish. Poblanos go particularly well in a variety of cream sauces for meat, chicken and pasta. See the recipes at the end of the article... read more

Mexico this month - August Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of August. read more

Saint James and the Moors: Mexico's Tastoanes Carol Wheeler

Masked dancers take to the streets on July 25 to reenact an age old battle fought in Spain long before the conquest. The ceremonial tastoan (sometimes spelled tastuan) rituals come from the 12th century and were originally known as the dance of the Moors and the Christians. In Spain's version, the dance symbolizes the expulsion of the Moors by the Christians, while Mexico's variation is commonly interpreted as the representation of the Spanish conquest of Mexico in the 1500s. read more

July 24 is National Tequila Day: A tequila resource page

Statue in Tequila

Present in the popular margarita, tequila can stand alone as a fine liquor. The popular traditional drink boasts an appellation or denomination of origin. Distilled from the nectar of the Weber blue agave the tequila dates from the 16th century. It may have originated in the Mexican town of Amatitan, Jalisco, where a pre-Hispanic distillery has been discovered in El Tecuane Canyon. MexConnect invites you to celebrate by getting to know this quintessentially Mexican drink — Mexico's gift to the world.

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July in Oaxaca: The Mexican pageantry of the Guelaguetza Alvin Starkman

Tehuana women in their elaborate traditional dress. © Oscar Encines, 2008
With pageantry unrivalled in all of Mexico, the Guelaguetza is the most colorful and exhilarating of the multitude of festivals in Oaxaca. And in a state with sixteen different indigenous cultures, each with its own unique traditions including language, food, music, dress and dance, it should come as no surprise that the annual two-week July extravaganza draws both Mexican nationals and tourists from all corners of the globe. read more

Mexico this month - July Tony Burton

Read about Mexico's important historical events that have occurred during the month of July.

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Personal reminiscences of Mexico's Huichol people I: A disappearing way of life? Ronald A. Barnett ©

Huichol artisan teaches his grandson
I began to discover that certain vested interests involving the Huichol did not welcome outsiders. There was almost a political rivalry among various individuals and groups who regarded the Huichol as their own private preserve. This sense of proprietary rights by over the Huichol was confirmed later when I went to Mexico City. Back then there was intense rivalry among people working with the Huichol., too. read more

Mexico magic is all around Marvin West

Tecozautla-Hidalgo
Pueblos Majicos
Unbelievable: Mexico has 111 magic towns with more in the hatchery. The Pueblos Mágicos program was launched in 2001 by Mexico’s Secretariat of Tourism in conjunction with other federal and stateagencies to promote towns chosen for natural beauty, cultural riches and historical relevance. read more

Mexican Kaleidoscope - Myths, Mysteries & Mystique. A review of Tony Burton's newest book. Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Tony Burton’s recently published Mexican Kaleidoscope is a whirlwind trip through some of the underpinnings of Mexican culture, told with humour, affection and well-documented facts. This readable compendium of little known stories made me want to revisit many places I’d already seen. How much richer my experiences would have been had I been able to take this user-friendly and easily carried tome of gems with me when I was in Mexico. read more

Top 10 Carnivals in Mexico Daniel Wheeler

Tlaxcala dancer
Celebrated 45 days before Easter (April 16th this year), Carnaval is a celebration of earthly, or carnal pleasures before the austerity and sacrifice of Lent. Beginning on the Friday before Ash Wednesday, Carnival reaches its climax on Mardi Gras — "Fat Tuesday."

With excellent weather all year round, Mexico is a great place to experience the excitement, music, dance and color of Carnaval. Here are our Top Ten picks for Carnival in Mexico, but there are many, many more. read more

Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A history of courage, intrigue and unlikely friendships Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Cover image of Dr. Michael Hogan's Abraham Lincoln and Mexico.
The United States and Mexico struggled through volatile years of suffering and carnage to become unified nations. Michael Hogan’s thoroughly researched and passionately written "Abraham Lincoln and Mexico" is a thought-provoking read that covers part of that struggle from 1822, when Americans settlers first arrived on Mexican territory, to 1867, when Mexico finally freed itself from France’s intrusion into its territory. The nineteenth century was a turbulent period in American and Mexican history. read more

Mexican Christmas menu ideas: Posadas, Noche Buena, Navidad Karen Hursh Graber

In Mexico, the Christmas season is a month-long fiesta, starting with the feast of the Virgin of Guadalupe on December 12th, and continuing through the posadas, Noche Buena and Navidad, right up to the Three Kings Day on January 6th.

During this celebratory month, preparing seasonal dishes is an important part of the festivities, with each occasion having its own specialties. These can be easily adapted to holiday menus everywhere, and a Mexican culinary theme is fun, festive, and versatile. read more

Our Lady of Guadalupe: Tonantzin or the Virgin Mary? Ronald A. Barnett ©

It was on December 9, 1531, when Juan Diego, a humble Indian peasant, was crossing the hill of Tepeyac just north of present day Mexico City that — it is said— a beautiful shining woman miraculously appeared to him. Declaring herself to be the Virgin Mary, Mother of Christ, she called Juan her son. He reported his vision to Bishop Juan de Zumarraga, who demanded additional evidence of the divine apparition. On December 12 then, Juan Diego returned to Tepeyac, where the Virgin told him to gather roses where none had grown previously. Then, when the Indian delivered the roses to the Bishop, the image of the Virgin Mary miraculously appeared on his cloak. read more

Did you know? The Thanksgiving and Christmas turkey originated in Mexico. Tony Burton

Strange but true; the bird now so closely associated with many festive meals is a direct descendant of the wild turkeys still found in many parts of Mexico. How is it possible that a Mexican bird acquired the name turkey?

The first use in English of the word "turkey" to describe the bird dates back to 1555. By 1575 , turkey was already becoming the preferred main course for Christmas dinner. Curiously, the Turkish name for the turkey is hindi, which is probably derived from "chicken of India", perhaps based on the then-common misconception that Columbus had reached the Indies... read more

Autumn in Mexico: Iconic ingredients for Fall Holidays Karen Hursh Graber

Pollo con Manzanas
Karen Hursh Graber 2015
In recent years, “seasonal” has become a culinary buzzword, something seemingly new and novel in the U.S., where just about anything is available at any time, no matter its origin or how far it must be shipped. In contrast, Mexican cooks have traditionally relied on local availability to determine what to buy and serve. Although the rise of supermarkets and chain groceries has brought an increasing number of products that have traveled great distances, Mexicans do continue to base many meals on what has customarily been prepared and served at certain times of the year. And autumn, with its many important celebrations, is one of those times. The end of the rainy season brings the gathering of summer’s bounty, and the fall harvest yields many of the country’s characteristic ingredients. read more

Did You Know? The Hero of Nacozari Tony Burton

November 7, 2007, marks the centenary of the death of Jesús García, the "Hero of Nacozari." The small town of Nacozari occupies a valley nestled in the foothills of the Western Sierra Madre (Sierra ... read more

Day of the Dead - A Celebration David McLaughlin

Rituals and traditions can provide a sense of place and timelessness. They offer us the opportunity of feeling connected to what has gone before and what will continue through the corridors of time. It seems to me that of the three countries in North America, Mexico has developed a culture that has some of the richest and most meaningful rituals. One in particular I have adopted as it gives me much that I did not have when I lived in Canada. read more
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