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Leonora Carrington in Mexico City: perspective of a person, place, and time Rita Pomade

In 1966, the Mexican Olympic Committee contacted my husband with a proposal: To photograph the most talented and notable of Mexico's creative community. Among those he was to photograph was the highly acclaimed and brilliant artist, Leonora Carrington, a woman as well-known for her eccentricities as for her creative output. Leonora took to my husband immediately and invited him to one of her famous dinners. "Bring your wife," she said. read more

Beauty among the ruins: Hacienda Jaral de Berrio Edythe Anstey Hanen

The glory days of hacienda living are today just an intriguing piece of Mexico’s history. The haciendas flourished as autonomous, self-governing worlds unto themselves and hacienda life typically included their own parish church, a school, a post office and a railway. Hacienda Jaral de Berrio stands as only a distant memory of those halcyon days, but its forsaken beauty is still reminiscent of another more resplendent time in rural Mexico’s history. Join us as we explore its historical splendour. read more

Mexico by Motorcycle: An adventure Story and Guide Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Mexico by Motorcycle: An adventure Story and Guide - cover image
Although the book is by a biker for bikers, I was drawn into his insights and reflections on Mexico when he made his first trip down to the Yucatan in 1991.  This section is alive with rich detail and genuine appreciation for the people, culture, and physical beauty of the region. I was immersed in his story of the isolated stretch of road along the jungle when his bike died – the description of the experience was visceral and brought me there. read more

The bus goes everywhere. Marvin West

A Mexican local bus
Buses go everywhere in Mexico. Indeed, some encounter problems. There are natural, mechanical and human issues. Brakes fail. Weather is disruptive. Drivers doze. Fast buses smash into slow trucks. Dangerous curves are actually dangerous. There is another side to the story. The bus is one of the intriguing success stories in Mexico. The system works. The bus offers a somewhat economical and effective means to explore the entire country. read more

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating? Donald W Miles

Ask about the history behind these celebrations, and a few may be able to tell you that the Mexicans defeated an invading French army on that date in 1862. Beyond that — except maybe in Puebla — general knowledge of the circumstances becomes sketchy. Why were the French there? What happened next? Did the French just go away? Many teachers in the U.S. still tell their classes that May fifth is Mexican Independence Day, which is dead wrong. read more

Huichol religion under siege (again). Part 1 Ronald A. Barnett ©

The Huichol Indians of Jalisco and Nayarit have accomplished the almost incredible feat of maintaining their independence and most of their traditional values well into the 21st century. Thanks to the rugged terrain of the Sierra Madre mountains the Huichols were able to escape the brunt of the Spanish invasion. While their long-anticipated demise as a separate indigenous people has not yet arrived, new warning signs continue to appear on the horizon and the Huichol continue to be under siege by both secular and religious authorities. read more

Secret places in Mexico Marvin West

Ojo de Lago 1997
As a child, I sometimes read comic books for entertainment. I did not believe in flying dragons but they certainly stimulated the imagination. As an old-timer, older than dirt, I read travel writers just for fun. I do believe some write at great length about Mexico without ever visiting. Case in point: Smarter Travel magazine had a headline about Mexico secret places. That got my undivided attention. "Ready to discover the real Mexico? If you haven't yet ventured beyond the mega resorts and Senor Frog franchises, here's help. In these 10 cities, undiscovered by most American travelers, you'll see another side of Mexico." The thought of learning about 10 places “undiscovered by most American travelers” was exciting. For many years we have traveled widely but, unlike the Hank Snow long-ago song, we have not been everywhere. read more

Ask an old gringo about baseball, Canadians, ukuleles and orange juice Marvin West

Roberto Osuna
Readers of MexConnect magazine are sharper than the average turkey. They monitor the news, spot little headlines and hear tidbits and rumors related to Mexico and immediately check to see what the old gringo knows. Depending on the subject and how much really good Mexican coffee he had with breakfast, ability to inform fluctuates. His level of knowledge ranges from some, to a little, to not much but he keeps trying. He deals with questions more or less in the order of arrival -- or probable impact on his vast international following or whether he likes them or not read more

Mexican winter produce: making comfort food healthy Karen Hursh Graber

The winter season brings with it a culinary conundrum. Part of you craves the comfort foods, mostly creamy and carby, that the cold weather seems to inspire. Some of this is induced by childhood memories of Mom baking bread and cooking hearty stews as chill winds blew outside. Another part of you is facing the expanded waistline and added pounds that arrived as unwanted holiday gifts. This is the adult part, the one who dreads being mistaken for a beach ball on that vacation at Playa del Carmen. read more

Citrus vinaigrette: Vinagreta de citricos Karen Hursh Graber

    Use this as a marinade for chicken or fish, or a dressing for green salads, especially those with oranges or grapefruit. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon each of:     Apple cider vinegar  ... read more

MexConnect - The next twenty years Tony Burton

Mexconnect is the oldest content site about Mexico still going. Now more than 20 years old, with, at last count, 3772 articles, over 8000 photos (including 597 photo galleries) and 687 recipes. Even if you could read an article a minute, it would take you 63 hours to read your way through the site, and that's not allowing time for the recipes or photographs. read more

American influence on the development and rise of Mexican cinema Joshua V. G. Chanin

During the early years of the twentieth century, the Mexican people began to appreciate the film industry that was happening to their north, and prompted the expansion of the Mexican cinema. Over the past eight decades, Mexican cinema popularity has increased, along with a significant transformation in the culture of Mexico. read more

Missing Order of the Aztec Eagle Marvin West

Placa Orden Aguila Aztecal
Placa Orden Aguila Aztecal
I have waited and waited, patiently seven-eighths of the time. After all these years, after a hundred and a half MexConnect columns about Mexico, most of them favorable, I have not yet been invited into the Order of the Aztec Eagle. Past presidents of this colorful country could have done it with a wave of the magic wand. The present leader needs only speak the words – West next read more

Camino de Guanajuato Allan Wall

Guanajuato City’s colonial downtown, constructed centuries ago, resembles that of old Spain. In colonial times, the mines here were producing a significant part of the world’s silver production. It was the silver that financed the massive building projects which included churches, and the massive Alhondiga. This latter building, built at the end of the colonial period as a corn storage facility, was soon used as a fort, later served as a prison, and is now a museum. read more

New Year's Eve traditions in Mexico Daniel Wheeler

The year-end holidays in Mexico are always known for time honored traditions and a family oriented spirit. You can sing Christmas carols with your friends and family and enjoy some buñuelos, tamales a... read more

December 28 or April Fools? Mexico celebrates the Holy Innocents Sergio Wheeler

In Mexico and all over the Catholic world, December 28 commemorates the Santos Inocentes or Holy Innocents, considered the first Christian martyrs.

In Mexico — as well as Spain and other Latin American countries — December 28 is the equivalent of April Fool's Day.

Although it may seem irreverent, jokes of all kinds are played on the innocents. Fortunately, the jokes are always well taken. read more

Hurting Time for Mothers of Mexico Missing Marvin West

Christmas is family time. We see it in our community. Workers are off for a few extra days. Three generations climb into pickup trucks and go visit relatives – even if it is just across town. They have lunch and dinner gatherings. We see the extra children playing in the neighborhood. It is obvious when there is an empty chair at a table. read more

Mexico's endless Pacific beach: sun, surf, sand, seafood and solitude Gerry Soroka

There's more to the Mexico seashore than skimboards, seafood and sun-bathing bronzed bodies: there is solitude. There are vast stretches of uninhabited or unfrequented beaches lounging serenely beside a roiling sea that stretches westward seemingly into infinity. read more

Our Lady of Guadalupe Luis Dumois

Virgin of Guadalupe - Tree of Life sculptures by Juan Hernández Arzaluz of Metepec.
Our Lady of Guadalupe has accompanied us in war and peace, in joy and grief, in life and death. She was the standard for Hidalgo and Morelos armies. She has been invoked and sought by us in times of despair and destruction, in times of serenity and reconstruction, then and now, as She will be tomorrow. I know that I can be a perfect Catholic and still not believe in Her. But I don't see how can anyone consider herself or himself truly a Mexican without trusting in the Lady from Heaven, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe. read more

Myth and History as described in the Mexican Codices Ronald A. Barnett ©

Aztec calendar stone
One of the problems encountered by historians and Mesoamerican scholars is the inextricable intermingling of myths and legends alongside what appear to be sober historical facts in many Mexican codices or painted books from the Valley of Mexico, Yucatan, and the Oaxaca area of southern Mexico. read more

Ask an old gringo about tax cuts, wind farms, Alebrijes and egg sandwiches Marvin West

The alebrije is a uniquely Oaxacan variety of Mexican folk art. This one depicts a rabbit. © Alan Goodin 2007
Mexico is a very interesting country. If anything hasn’t already happened here, it soon will. Nowhere else in the world are people protesting because taxes are going down. $207 million USD has gone missing. Giant Alebrijes are roaming the streets, and egg sandwiches are missing from grocery stores. read more

Mexico changes, Mexico remains the same Marvin West

The more Mexico changes, the more it remains the same. Despite delusions of assorted miracles, it is still largely a country where the past remains vividly present. We have been hearing about reforms since Enrique Peña Nieto launched his presidential campaign in November 2011. Together we will build a new and better Mexico, he said. As so eloquently added by a TV comedian, exaggerated promises come with “buckets of saliva.” Foreign investors took the bait. Mexico is a potential manufacturing powerhouse. Alas, the proverbial man on the street has been looking everywhere, trying to identify improvements in ordinary living. What he sees is fuzzy. read more

Calabaza con Rajas: Pumpkin with Roasted Poblano Chiles Karen Hursh Graber

Nothing says autumn like pumpkins, and this dish, with the smoky flavor of roasted poblano chiles, captures the colors of turning leaves. Serve it, along with rice and salad, as a vegetarian main dish, or a side dish with grilled or roasted meat or poultry. read more

Pastel de Chocolate y Nueces: Mexican Chocolate Nut Cake Karen Hursh Graber

Ingredients:   1 ½ cups flour ¾ cup sugar ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ancho chile powder (optional) ... read more
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