MexConnect
in Help?
Showing 51—75 of 4400 results.

Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A history of courage, intrigue and unlikely friendships Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Cover image of Dr. Michael Hogan's Abraham Lincoln and Mexico.
The United States and Mexico struggled through volatile years of suffering and carnage to become unified nations. Michael Hogan’s thoroughly researched and passionately written "Abraham Lincoln and Mexico" is a thought-provoking read that covers part of that struggle from 1822, when Americans settlers first arrived on Mexican territory, to 1867, when Mexico finally freed itself from France’s intrusion into its territory. The nineteenth century was a turbulent period in American and Mexican history. read more

Mexican Christmas menu ideas: Posadas, Noche Buena, Navidad Karen Hursh Graber

In Mexico, the Christmas season is a month-long fiesta, starting with the feast of the Virgin of Guadalupe on December 12th, and continuing through the posadas, Noche Buena and Navidad, right up to the Three Kings Day on January 6th.

During this celebratory month, preparing seasonal dishes is an important part of the festivities, with each occasion having its own specialties. These can be easily adapted to holiday menus everywhere, and a Mexican culinary theme is fun, festive, and versatile. read more

Our Lady of Guadalupe: Tonantzin or the Virgin Mary? Ronald A. Barnett ©

It was on December 9, 1531, when Juan Diego, a humble Indian peasant, was crossing the hill of Tepeyac just north of present day Mexico City that — it is said— a beautiful shining woman miraculously appeared to him. Declaring herself to be the Virgin Mary, Mother of Christ, she called Juan her son. He reported his vision to Bishop Juan de Zumarraga, who demanded additional evidence of the divine apparition. On December 12 then, Juan Diego returned to Tepeyac, where the Virgin told him to gather roses where none had grown previously. Then, when the Indian delivered the roses to the Bishop, the image of the Virgin Mary miraculously appeared on his cloak. read more

Did you know? The Thanksgiving and Christmas turkey originated in Mexico. Tony Burton

Strange but true; the bird now so closely associated with many festive meals is a direct descendant of the wild turkeys still found in many parts of Mexico. How is it possible that a Mexican bird acquired the name turkey?

The first use in English of the word "turkey" to describe the bird dates back to 1555. By 1575 , turkey was already becoming the preferred main course for Christmas dinner. Curiously, the Turkish name for the turkey is hindi, which is probably derived from "chicken of India", perhaps based on the then-common misconception that Columbus had reached the Indies... read more

Autumn in Mexico: Iconic ingredients for Fall Holidays Karen Hursh Graber

Pollo con Manzanas
Karen Hursh Graber 2015
In recent years, “seasonal” has become a culinary buzzword, something seemingly new and novel in the U.S., where just about anything is available at any time, no matter its origin or how far it must be shipped. In contrast, Mexican cooks have traditionally relied on local availability to determine what to buy and serve. Although the rise of supermarkets and chain groceries has brought an increasing number of products that have traveled great distances, Mexicans do continue to base many meals on what has customarily been prepared and served at certain times of the year. And autumn, with its many important celebrations, is one of those times. The end of the rainy season brings the gathering of summer’s bounty, and the fall harvest yields many of the country’s characteristic ingredients. read more

Did You Know? The Hero of Nacozari Tony Burton

November 7, 2007, marks the centenary of the death of Jesús García, the "Hero of Nacozari." The small town of Nacozari occupies a valley nestled in the foothills of the Western Sierra Madre (Sierra ... read more

Pilgrimage with La Virgen de Zapopan Dane Chandos

The much venerated image of Mexico's Virgin of Zapopan
This is an account of the annual procession of La Virgen de Zapopan from te Cathedral in Guadalajara to her home in the Basilica de Zapopan, as experienced in the early 1940s. The procession always takes place on October 12th.

They say that, in the seventeenth century, the storms in Guadalajara were so severe that repeatedly bell ringers in the churches were killed, so that at last they brought into the city the most venerated virgin of the neighbourhood, she of Zapopan.

Ever since that first summer, centuries ago, she has passed the whole rainy season in Guadalajara, from June through September, staying two weeks in each church... read more

Mexican spring produce: fresh ideas for warm weather dining Karen Hursh Graber

Agua de Melon
The change of seasons in Mexico brings a shift in the kinds of produce available in the markets. The young greens, stone fruit, and baby new vegetables that appear in mercados in springtime are ideal ingredients for lighter fare in warmer weather. For unlike its north-of-the-border neighbors, Mexico experiences its hottest time of the year in spring, rather than summer. The time between Easter and the start of the rainy season, which brings cooling relief, finds those who can manage vacations headed for the beach, and others seeking shade in parks. Both settings call for picnic food, the kind of portable meal sometimes called itacate, after the bundled mid-day meal that workers used to bring to the fields. read more

Pineapple and strawberry water: Agua de piña y fresa Karen Hursh Graber

    This is as attractive as it is delicious. Be sure to disinfect strawberries no matter where you buy them. Ingredients:   1 whole, small pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into chunks ... read more

Mexican investigators may get bad rap Marvin West

K’inich Janaab’ Pakal death mask in jade.
The reputation of Mexican criminal investigators is often somewhere below zero, except on this occasion. They don’t even hear about a lot of crimes. They seldom solve cases. Even when they think they have caught a crook, they rarely gain convictions. Judges shake their heads. Maybe the warrant was defective, wrong address, misspelled name. Or maybe there is mistaken identity, that is not Jose. Stranger things have happened. I am reminded of the great Mexico museum robbery of long, long ago. It made huge headlines. I know. I wrote some. Thieves stole 140 thought-to-be-priceless Maya, Aztec and other artifacts from world-famous National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City on Christmas Eve 1985. Nothing like that had ever happened. read more

Baby new potato salad with roasted poblanos: Ensalada de papas con poblanos: Karen Hursh Graber

    The tiny new potatoes that are part of the spring landscape in the Cholula market are firm and perfect for salads. My favorite vegetable stand has some the size of marbles. It is unnecessary to ... read more

Spinach empanadas: Empanadas de espinacas Karen Hursh Graber

    With no meat or dairy, these empanadas will keep for a day at the beach or park, or just lunch in the yard or on the patio. For the dough: 2 cups all purpose flour ¾ cup masa ha... read more

For graduation celebrations: Mexican summer buffets Karen Hursh Graber

Besides the seemingly endless string of fiestas, weddings, baptisms and saints' days throughout the year, the warm months bring graduations galore. Everything from a kindergarten commencement to the completion of a PhD is celebrated exuberantly in Mexico. And the season's balmy weather invites merrymakers to move outside. Even the start of the rainy season does not deter al fresco festivities. read more

Leonora Carrington in Mexico City: perspective of a person, place, and time Rita Pomade

In 1966, the Mexican Olympic Committee contacted my husband with a proposal: To photograph the most talented and notable of Mexico's creative community. Among those he was to photograph was the highly acclaimed and brilliant artist, Leonora Carrington, a woman as well-known for her eccentricities as for her creative output. Leonora took to my husband immediately and invited him to one of her famous dinners. "Bring your wife," she said. read more

Beauty among the ruins: Hacienda Jaral de Berrio Edythe Anstey Hanen

The glory days of hacienda living are today just an intriguing piece of Mexico’s history. The haciendas flourished as autonomous, self-governing worlds unto themselves and hacienda life typically included their own parish church, a school, a post office and a railway. Hacienda Jaral de Berrio stands as only a distant memory of those halcyon days, but its forsaken beauty is still reminiscent of another more resplendent time in rural Mexico’s history. Join us as we explore its historical splendour. read more

Mexico by Motorcycle: An adventure Story and Guide Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Mexico by Motorcycle: An adventure Story and Guide - cover image
Although the book is by a biker for bikers, I was drawn into his insights and reflections on Mexico when he made his first trip down to the Yucatan in 1991.  This section is alive with rich detail and genuine appreciation for the people, culture, and physical beauty of the region. I was immersed in his story of the isolated stretch of road along the jungle when his bike died – the description of the experience was visceral and brought me there. read more

The bus goes everywhere. Marvin West

A Mexican local bus
Buses go everywhere in Mexico. Indeed, some encounter problems. There are natural, mechanical and human issues. Brakes fail. Weather is disruptive. Drivers doze. Fast buses smash into slow trucks. Dangerous curves are actually dangerous. There is another side to the story. The bus is one of the intriguing success stories in Mexico. The system works. The bus offers a somewhat economical and effective means to explore the entire country. read more

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating? Donald W Miles

Ask about the history behind these celebrations, and a few may be able to tell you that the Mexicans defeated an invading French army on that date in 1862. Beyond that — except maybe in Puebla — general knowledge of the circumstances becomes sketchy. Why were the French there? What happened next? Did the French just go away? Many teachers in the U.S. still tell their classes that May fifth is Mexican Independence Day, which is dead wrong. read more

Huichol religion under siege (again). Part 1 Ronald A. Barnett ©

The Huichol Indians of Jalisco and Nayarit have accomplished the almost incredible feat of maintaining their independence and most of their traditional values well into the 21st century. Thanks to the rugged terrain of the Sierra Madre mountains the Huichols were able to escape the brunt of the Spanish invasion. While their long-anticipated demise as a separate indigenous people has not yet arrived, new warning signs continue to appear on the horizon and the Huichol continue to be under siege by both secular and religious authorities. read more

Secret places in Mexico Marvin West

Tarahumana
Ojo de Lago 1997
As a child, I sometimes read comic books for entertainment. I did not believe in flying dragons but they certainly stimulated the imagination. As an old-timer, older than dirt, I read travel writers just for fun. I do believe some write at great length about Mexico without ever visiting. Case in point: Smarter Travel magazine had a headline about Mexico secret places. That got my undivided attention. "Ready to discover the real Mexico? If you haven't yet ventured beyond the mega resorts and Senor Frog franchises, here's help. In these 10 cities, undiscovered by most American travelers, you'll see another side of Mexico." The thought of learning about 10 places “undiscovered by most American travelers” was exciting. For many years we have traveled widely but, unlike the Hank Snow long-ago song, we have not been everywhere. read more

Ask an old gringo about baseball, Canadians, ukuleles and orange juice Marvin West

Roberto Osuna
Readers of MexConnect magazine are sharper than the average turkey. They monitor the news, spot little headlines and hear tidbits and rumors related to Mexico and immediately check to see what the old gringo knows. Depending on the subject and how much really good Mexican coffee he had with breakfast, ability to inform fluctuates. His level of knowledge ranges from some, to a little, to not much but he keeps trying. He deals with questions more or less in the order of arrival -- or probable impact on his vast international following or whether he likes them or not read more

Mexican winter produce: making comfort food healthy Karen Hursh Graber

The winter season brings with it a culinary conundrum. Part of you craves the comfort foods, mostly creamy and carby, that the cold weather seems to inspire. Some of this is induced by childhood memories of Mom baking bread and cooking hearty stews as chill winds blew outside. Another part of you is facing the expanded waistline and added pounds that arrived as unwanted holiday gifts. This is the adult part, the one who dreads being mistaken for a beach ball on that vacation at Playa del Carmen. read more

Citrus vinaigrette: Vinagreta de citricos Karen Hursh Graber

    Use this as a marinade for chicken or fish, or a dressing for green salads, especially those with oranges or grapefruit. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon each of:     Apple cider vinegar  ... read more

MexConnect - The next twenty years Tony Burton

Mexconnect is the oldest content site about Mexico still going. Now more than 20 years old, with, at last count, 3772 articles, over 8000 photos (including 597 photo galleries) and 687 recipes. Even if you could read an article a minute, it would take you 63 hours to read your way through the site, and that's not allowing time for the recipes or photographs. read more

American influence on the development and rise of Mexican cinema Joshua V. G. Chanin

During the early years of the twentieth century, the Mexican people began to appreciate the film industry that was happening to their north, and prompted the expansion of the Mexican cinema. Over the past eight decades, Mexican cinema popularity has increased, along with a significant transformation in the culture of Mexico. read more
Showing 51—75 of 4400 results.
All Tags