MexConnect
All results for region “Sinaloa”
Showing 1—25 of 32 results

Mexican investigators may get bad rap Marvin West

K’inich Janaab’ Pakal death mask in jade.
The reputation of Mexican criminal investigators is often somewhere below zero, except on this occasion. They don’t even hear about a lot of crimes. They seldom solve cases. Even when they think they have caught a crook, they rarely gain convictions. Judges shake their heads. Maybe the warrant was defective, wrong address, misspelled name. Or maybe there is mistaken identity, that is not Jose. Stranger things have happened. I am reminded of the great Mexico museum robbery of long, long ago. It made huge headlines. I know. I wrote some. Thieves stole 140 thought-to-be-priceless Maya, Aztec and other artifacts from world-famous National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City on Christmas Eve 1985. Nothing like that had ever happened. read more

Sweet Spot: A novel about Mazatlan Carnival, Dirty Politics, and Baseball Reviewed by James Tipton

book cover of Sweet Spot: A novel about Mazatlan Carnival, Dirty Politics, and Baseball by Linton Robinson
I've read a lot of novels in the first ten years of this new century, and I must say that Sweet Spot is one of the three or four I like the best.
The story is set during seven spectacular days of Carnival in Mazatlán, the second largest Carnival in the world. A lot happens during those seven days, including scandal, murder, amoral politics, drug lords searching for our protagonist "Mundo," and bed time with a desirable young revolutionary, the amoral Mijares.
Sweet Spot is incredible. Linton Robinson should be catapulted to the top of the pile of contemporary authors. Why didn't this novel win the National Book Award or the Pulitzer Prize? read more

Mazatlan: why snowbirds keep coming back Carolyn Patten

The closest of Mexico's Pacific beach resorts to the U.S. West Coast, Mazatlan is a favorite winter destination for snowbirds who love its casual, sometimes gritty atmosphere, low prices, fresh seafood and miles of golden beaches. Many Canadians and West Coasters return year after year, settling in for a couple of weeks or half a year. read more

El Fuerte in Sinaloa, Mexico, was once the capital of Arizona Tony Burton

Prior to the founding of San Juan de Carapoa (later renamed El Fuerte de Montesclaros) by Francisco de Ibarra in 1564, relatively little is known of the early Indian peoples living in the Fuerte valley... read more

Mazatlan: Tequila, tans and working stiffs Gerry Soroka

There are different views of Mexico, as diverse as the numbers of observers.

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Did you know? Los Mochis and Topolobampo are both examples of "new towns". Tony Burton

The city of Los Mochis ("Mochees", as locals call it) in the northern state of Sinaloa, is one of Mexico's newest cities. It dates back only as far as 1872, when a U.S. engineer, Albert Kimsey Owen (18... read more

Did You Know? The World's first aerial bombing: the Battle of Topolobampo, Mexico Tony Burton

In the early years of the twentieth century, the nature of warfare changed dramatically. The deployment of aircraft unleashed a powerful new weapon for warring factions, previously forced to rely only ... read more

Did you know? Mexico was a very different place fifty years ago Tony Burton

G. M. Bashford's Tourist Guide to Mexico was first published exactly fifty years ago in 1954. It was one of a spate of motoring book guides written after World War II as Americans began to hit the open... read more

An Olmec Homerun George Bergin

When Ramon handed the ball to me, I was pleased to find it was latex, not some synthetic material. It was probably very old, made from raw rubber. This one did not have a human skull inside. As I hand... read more

Did you know? Sinaloa has the most beautiful women in Mexico. Tony Burton

A chance remark recently by Mexico Connect publisher David McLaughlin has prompted me to examine the statistics on Mexican beauty. As a single footloose and fancy-free 20-something-year-old in Mexico ... read more

Mazatlan - not just another resort Marvin H. Perton

Angela Peralta is a big name in Mazatlán (mah-saht-LAHN). And practically everyone, especially the locals, are happy to tell you "the real story" about this legendary, Mexican diva. Only every story y... read more

Old Mazatlan has its charms John Mitchell

At first glance, Mazatlán looks like a typical Mexican beach resort with boxy high-rise hotels and loud nightclubs crowding its shoreline, but there is more to this old port city than meets the eye. T... read more

Copper Canyon, Chihuahua, Mexico by Richard D. Fisher Reviewed by Allan Cogan

I suspect this may turn out more like a travel article than a book review. In late March we took a tour through the length of the Copper Canyon and I find it difficult to know how to write about this book without bringing in various aspects of the Canyon trip itself. It really is a spectacular journey and Richard Fisher's account does total justice to the subject matter. This is a large format quality paperback and it contains hundreds of excellent photos of the people and places one encounters along the way. I can't imagine a better souvenir to take away. read more

Mazatlan Christina Nealson

Breathless foam Starfish-laden scaly crest of wave Balloons of stinging jellyfish The crush of birth called beach. Journal, Mayo 27, 2003 ... read more

Beach-bumming it in Mazatlan Brent & Jane Cassie

Crooked under one arm, he lovingly hugs a water-beaten body board as if it were his best friend. A mass of dirty blonde dreadlocks crowns his scalp and from under sun-faded Hawaiian shorts, his bronzed... read more

Chihuahua's Copper Canyon: the treasure of the Sierra Madres Roberta Sotonoff

IF YOU GO . . . TRANSPORTATION ARRANGEMENTS AND ACCOMMODATIONS REFERENCES Alongside the railroad trac... read more

Mazatlan, a European city Manuel Gomez

I was recently invited to write the prologue for a book on Mazatlán history, with the condition that I relate Mazatlán to Europe. As a Mazatleco who has been living in Switzerland since 1982, ... read more

The cuisine of Sinaloa: Cenadurias in Mazatlan serve caldo and conversation Joe Ketchum

During the day visitors come down the long entranceway that gives this restaurant its name, asking if it is open. Despite the sign at the entrance to El Tunel, showing the opening time ­ 5:30 p.m. ­ ... read more
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