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All results for region “Guanajuato”
Showing 1—25 of 104 results

Beauty among the ruins: Hacienda Jaral de Berrio Edythe Anstey Hanen

The glory days of hacienda living are today just an intriguing piece of Mexico’s history. The haciendas flourished as autonomous, self-governing worlds unto themselves and hacienda life typically included their own parish church, a school, a post office and a railway. Hacienda Jaral de Berrio stands as only a distant memory of those halcyon days, but its forsaken beauty is still reminiscent of another more resplendent time in rural Mexico’s history. Join us as we explore its historical splendour. read more

Secret places in Mexico Marvin West

Tarahumana
Ojo de Lago 1997
As a child, I sometimes read comic books for entertainment. I did not believe in flying dragons but they certainly stimulated the imagination. As an old-timer, older than dirt, I read travel writers just for fun. I do believe some write at great length about Mexico without ever visiting. Case in point: Smarter Travel magazine had a headline about Mexico secret places. That got my undivided attention. "Ready to discover the real Mexico? If you haven't yet ventured beyond the mega resorts and Senor Frog franchises, here's help. In these 10 cities, undiscovered by most American travelers, you'll see another side of Mexico." The thought of learning about 10 places “undiscovered by most American travelers” was exciting. For many years we have traveled widely but, unlike the Hank Snow long-ago song, we have not been everywhere. read more

Camino de Guanajuato Allan Wall

Guanajuato City’s colonial downtown, constructed centuries ago, resembles that of old Spain. In colonial times, the mines here were producing a significant part of the world’s silver production. It was the silver that financed the massive building projects which included churches, and the massive Alhondiga. This latter building, built at the end of the colonial period as a corn storage facility, was soon used as a fort, later served as a prison, and is now a museum. read more

Our Lord of the Conquest Festival in San Miguel de Allende Tara Lowry

Every March, celebrations for El Senor de La Conquista (The Lord of the Conquest) completely fill the Jardin Principal of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Hundreds of colourful conchero or "Chichimeca" dancers dressed in pre-Hispanic style outfits arrive from the surrounding towns, representing different styles of dance and dress. read more

The Girl from Veracruz Reviewed by James Tipton

Girl from Veracruz book cover
The Girl from Veracruz is the twelfth and latest novel in John Scherber's Murder in Mexico mystery series. Like most of the others, it is set largely in San Miguel de Allende (although there is a trip to Veracruz).

It features the same team of detectives that we have come to care for in the preceding novels: Paul Zacher, age 40, a reasonably popular local artist; the lovely Maya Sanchez, his life partner (for the most part) and now head of the Paul Zacher Agency; and Cody Williams, a retired homicide detective from Peoria, Illinois. We also meet again Licenciado Diego Delgado, their contact with the San Miguel Judicial Police.

The story begins at the morgue... read more

Mexico's International Balloon Festival in Leon, Guanajuato Tara Lowry

The biggest event of its kind in Latin America, the International Balloon Festival in Leon, Guanajuato, takes place in the middle of November. Attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors over the four-day festival, and some two hundred hot air balloon teams from all over the world, it is a spectacle that justifies the early morning wake-up... read more

Tears from the Crown of Thorns: The Easter Passion Play in San Miguel de Allende Reviewed by Allan Cogan

"People unfamiliar with the Latin culture are curious, confused, and sometimes repulsed by the emphasis on suffering in religious figures. During Easter in North America, the focus is on the resurrection and the delights of spring. The event is concerned with the awe of transformation. There is resistance to facing the suffering that is a major part of this epic…." read more

Night of the altars in San Miguel de Allende Edythe Anstey Hanen

It is late afternoon in Mexico, two days before Palm Sunday, and it is the day that honours Nuestra Señora de los Dolores — Our Lady of Sorrows. All over town, San Miguel de Allende's families and b... read more

Jovenes Adelante: Scholarships for deserving students in San Miguel de Allende John Scherber

It started in 2001 with supplying a pair of shoes so that a young man didn't have to go to college barefoot. He'd already won a scholarship. A San Miguel woman named Helen Morris provided them, and a r... read more

Best in Mexico, best in the world Marvin West

© Nancy Harless, 2003
Intriguing writer Michael Dickson, aka Felipe Zapata atop his famous blog, once said of San Miguel de Allende: "It's a great place to live if you want to 'live in Mexico' without actually living in Mexico."

It is sometimes difficult to tell when Felipe is serious and when he is just stirring the pot but I thought he was on target when he said those limited to English could get along just fine without learning any Spanish or bothering themselves with little nuisances like cultural differences... read more

Mexican microeconomics: The Tuesday market in San Miguel de Allende John Scherber

Like a shimmering mirage that lasts only until your next blink, the Tuesday Market, or tianguis, appears once a week at dawn, assembled upon a vast windswept concrete slab near the parking lot of the S... read more

Audubon de Mexico: A community partner for ecological awareness John Scherber

I'm sitting in a third grade class at the Independencia School in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Aside from the charming teacher, there's hardly a full set of teeth in the room, although nobody's smile... read more

The Devil's Workshop James Tipton

The story begins as Mark Sands, a successful money manager — after little people with grubby hands drug him and drop him over the parapet of his broad veranda — is falling twenty-seven floors to his death.

Feeling detached, perhaps defensively, from his plummeting body, Sands wonders, "How had the little people emerged from the painting over his buffet?

It was his Rafael Cantú masterpiece, The Last Supper, the prize of his collection. And they were the characters from the painting. He recognized the odd, ragged leather outfits.

Had he been murdered by these nightmare versions of Christ and the Apostles?" ... read more

Easter in San Miguel de Allende: Our Lord of the Column Edythe Anstey Hanen

The church bells have been tolling most of the night, interrupted only intermittently by the blast of rockets soaring into the night sky. One resounding boom echoes throughout the city at midnight. Thi... read more

Building houses for Mexico's less fortunate John Scherber

For some northerners, heading south of the border to live after a busy career, Mexico looks like the land of mañana. All they have to do is kick back and watch the monarch butterflies pass on their an... read more

The Theft of the Virgin James Tipton

The Theft of the Virgin is the ninth book in John Scherber's Murder in Mexico series. He tells a good story.

In The Theft of the Virgin, sixty paintings from the popular Vergruen Reference Collection of outstanding masterpieces of art — all forgeries — are on temporary display at the Bellas Artes in San Miguel de Allende... But are they all forgeries?

Paul Zacher, one of many talented artists in San Miguel de Allende, is our protagonist and for the most part our narrator.

Zacher suspects a scheme that is putting originals into the hands of very amoral and very wealthy collectors. read more
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