MexConnect
All results for region “Central Highlands”
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Mexican investigators may get bad rap Marvin West

K’inich Janaab’ Pakal death mask in jade.
The reputation of Mexican criminal investigators is often somewhere below zero, except on this occasion. They don’t even hear about a lot of crimes. They seldom solve cases. Even when they think they have caught a crook, they rarely gain convictions. Judges shake their heads. Maybe the warrant was defective, wrong address, misspelled name. Or maybe there is mistaken identity, that is not Jose. Stranger things have happened. I am reminded of the great Mexico museum robbery of long, long ago. It made huge headlines. I know. I wrote some. Thieves stole 140 thought-to-be-priceless Maya, Aztec and other artifacts from world-famous National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City on Christmas Eve 1985. Nothing like that had ever happened. read more

Leonora Carrington in Mexico City: perspective of a person, place, and time Rita Pomade

In 1966, the Mexican Olympic Committee contacted my husband with a proposal: To photograph the most talented and notable of Mexico's creative community. Among those he was to photograph was the highly acclaimed and brilliant artist, Leonora Carrington, a woman as well-known for her eccentricities as for her creative output. Leonora took to my husband immediately and invited him to one of her famous dinners. "Bring your wife," she said. read more

Beauty among the ruins: Hacienda Jaral de Berrio Edythe Anstey Hanen

The glory days of hacienda living are today just an intriguing piece of Mexico’s history. The haciendas flourished as autonomous, self-governing worlds unto themselves and hacienda life typically included their own parish church, a school, a post office and a railway. Hacienda Jaral de Berrio stands as only a distant memory of those halcyon days, but its forsaken beauty is still reminiscent of another more resplendent time in rural Mexico’s history. Join us as we explore its historical splendour. read more

Cinco de Mayo: What is everybody celebrating? Donald W Miles

Ask about the history behind these celebrations, and a few may be able to tell you that the Mexicans defeated an invading French army on that date in 1862. Beyond that — except maybe in Puebla — general knowledge of the circumstances becomes sketchy. Why were the French there? What happened next? Did the French just go away? Many teachers in the U.S. still tell their classes that May fifth is Mexican Independence Day, which is dead wrong. read more

Secret places in Mexico Marvin West

Tarahumana
Ojo de Lago 1997
As a child, I sometimes read comic books for entertainment. I did not believe in flying dragons but they certainly stimulated the imagination. As an old-timer, older than dirt, I read travel writers just for fun. I do believe some write at great length about Mexico without ever visiting. Case in point: Smarter Travel magazine had a headline about Mexico secret places. That got my undivided attention. "Ready to discover the real Mexico? If you haven't yet ventured beyond the mega resorts and Senor Frog franchises, here's help. In these 10 cities, undiscovered by most American travelers, you'll see another side of Mexico." The thought of learning about 10 places “undiscovered by most American travelers” was exciting. For many years we have traveled widely but, unlike the Hank Snow long-ago song, we have not been everywhere. read more

Camino de Guanajuato Allan Wall

Guanajuato City’s colonial downtown, constructed centuries ago, resembles that of old Spain. In colonial times, the mines here were producing a significant part of the world’s silver production. It was the silver that financed the massive building projects which included churches, and the massive Alhondiga. This latter building, built at the end of the colonial period as a corn storage facility, was soon used as a fort, later served as a prison, and is now a museum. read more

Our Lady of Guadalupe Luis Dumois

Virgin of Guadalupe - Tree of Life sculptures by Juan Hernández Arzaluz of Metepec.
Our Lady of Guadalupe has accompanied us in war and peace, in joy and grief, in life and death. She was the standard for Hidalgo and Morelos armies. She has been invoked and sought by us in times of despair and destruction, in times of serenity and reconstruction, then and now, as She will be tomorrow. I know that I can be a perfect Catholic and still not believe in Her. But I don't see how can anyone consider herself or himself truly a Mexican without trusting in the Lady from Heaven, Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe. read more

Cinco de Mayo is more widely celebrated in USA than Mexico Tony Burton

US postage stamp commemorating Cinco de Mayo

Of the many battles fought on Mexican soil in the nineteenth century, only one — the Battle of Puebla, fought on May 5, 1862 — has given rise to a Mexican national holiday.

Why this one? The main reason is that the Battle of Puebla marks Mexico's only major military success since independence from Spain in 1821.

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Our Lord of the Conquest Festival in San Miguel de Allende Tara Lowry

Every March, celebrations for El Senor de La Conquista (The Lord of the Conquest) completely fill the Jardin Principal of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Hundreds of colourful conchero or "Chichimeca" dancers dressed in pre-Hispanic style outfits arrive from the surrounding towns, representing different styles of dance and dress. read more

The Girl from Veracruz Reviewed by James Tipton

Girl from Veracruz book cover
The Girl from Veracruz is the twelfth and latest novel in John Scherber's Murder in Mexico mystery series. Like most of the others, it is set largely in San Miguel de Allende (although there is a trip to Veracruz).

It features the same team of detectives that we have come to care for in the preceding novels: Paul Zacher, age 40, a reasonably popular local artist; the lovely Maya Sanchez, his life partner (for the most part) and now head of the Paul Zacher Agency; and Cody Williams, a retired homicide detective from Peoria, Illinois. We also meet again Licenciado Diego Delgado, their contact with the San Miguel Judicial Police.

The story begins at the morgue... read more

City of Ideas keeps overlooking me Marvin West

View of the Cathedral in the city of Puebla
© Rick Meyer, 1996

Great intellectuals of the world have been talking for seven years about making things better. You can see how that has turned out.

They assemble each November in Mexico, in Pubela, to empower a large paying audience and others with innovative ideas in science, technology, art, design, politics, education, culture, business, entertainment and other areas of very important knowledge.

The City of Ideas, a three-day session, has brought in more than 200 speakers. For some strange reason, I have not been invited...

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Mexico's International Balloon Festival in Leon, Guanajuato Tara Lowry

The biggest event of its kind in Latin America, the International Balloon Festival in Leon, Guanajuato, takes place in the middle of November. Attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors over the four-day festival, and some two hundred hot air balloon teams from all over the world, it is a spectacle that justifies the early morning wake-up... read more

Mexican chicken and allspice stew: Chilpozontle Karen Hursh Graber

A specialty of the Puebla mountain town of Zacapoaxtla, this Mexican dish uses allspice leaves as well as berries in a savory chicken stew. If you can't get allspice leaves, fresh bay leaves work well.... read more

Mexican pineapple, apple, orange and coconut marmalade: Mermelada de piña, manzana, naranja y coco Karen Hursh Graber

Mixed fruit marmalades are popular in Hidalgo, served with all manner of cakes and breads. This recipe for Mexican pineapple, apple, orange and coconut marmalade is adapted from CONACULTA's La Cocin... read more

Puebla style apple and blueberry marmalade: Mermelada de manzana y mora azul Karen Hursh Graber

This is a classic recipe from the Sierra Norte, adapted from Patricia Quintana's Cocina de los Angeles. Blueberries are nearly as abundant as apples in the Sierra, and the two make a wonderful combination. read more

The Zocalo is the heart of Mexico City Allan Wall

Throughout every period of Mexican history, throughout all the changes of regime and government, Mexico City's Zocalo has been at the center of it all, for almost 700 years. read more

Puebla-style turkey in mole: Mole poblano de guajolote Karen Hursh Graber

There are probably as many recipes for turkey in mole as there are cooks in Puebla, where it is indispensable at wedding fiestas. During Puebla's Festival de Mole Poblano, which is held for three conse... read more

Tears from the Crown of Thorns: The Easter Passion Play in San Miguel de Allende Reviewed by Allan Cogan

"People unfamiliar with the Latin culture are curious, confused, and sometimes repulsed by the emphasis on suffering in religious figures. During Easter in North America, the focus is on the resurrection and the delights of spring. The event is concerned with the awe of transformation. There is resistance to facing the suffering that is a major part of this epic…." read more

Night of the altars in San Miguel de Allende Edythe Anstey Hanen

It is late afternoon in Mexico, two days before Palm Sunday, and it is the day that honours Nuestra Señora de los Dolores — Our Lady of Sorrows. All over town, San Miguel de Allende's families and b... read more

Mexican chicken in pulque broth: Pollo en pulque Karen Hursh Graber

Now that pulque is sold in cans, it is more accessible to people outside the pulque producing regions, but diluted beer can be substituted and the recipe is written to be used with either one. This hea... read more
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