MexConnect
All results for region “Central Pacific”
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Personal reminiscences of Mexico's Huichol people I: A disappearing way of life? Ronald A. Barnett ©

Huichol artisan teaches his grandson
I began to discover that certain vested interests involving the Huichol did not welcome outsiders. There was almost a political rivalry among various individuals and groups who regarded the Huichol as their own private preserve. This sense of proprietary rights by over the Huichol was confirmed later when I went to Mexico City. Back then there was intense rivalry among people working with the Huichol., too. read more

Three Kings Day in Cajititlan, Mexico Sergio Wheeler

In Mexico, Christmas decorations stay up though January 6. The holiday celebrates Epiphany, when the Three Kings or Wise Men visited the baby Jesus with precious gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. El Día de los Santos Reyes is celebrated throughout Mexico. Yet nowhere is Three Kings Day more festive than in Cajititlan de Los Reyes, just 6.2 miles from Ajijic, Jalisco. read more

Pilgrimage with La Virgen de Zapopan Dane Chandos

The much venerated image of Mexico's Virgin of Zapopan
This is an account of the annual procession of La Virgen de Zapopan from te Cathedral in Guadalajara to her home in the Basilica de Zapopan, as experienced in the early 1940s. The procession always takes place on October 12th.

They say that, in the seventeenth century, the storms in Guadalajara were so severe that repeatedly bell ringers in the churches were killed, so that at last they brought into the city the most venerated virgin of the neighbourhood, she of Zapopan.

Ever since that first summer, centuries ago, she has passed the whole rainy season in Guadalajara, from June through September, staying two weeks in each church... read more

Huichol religion under siege (again). Part 1 Ronald A. Barnett ©

The Huichol Indians of Jalisco and Nayarit have accomplished the almost incredible feat of maintaining their independence and most of their traditional values well into the 21st century. Thanks to the rugged terrain of the Sierra Madre mountains the Huichols were able to escape the brunt of the Spanish invasion. While their long-anticipated demise as a separate indigenous people has not yet arrived, new warning signs continue to appear on the horizon and the Huichol continue to be under siege by both secular and religious authorities. read more

Mexico's endless Pacific beach: sun, surf, sand, seafood and solitude Gerry Soroka

There's more to the Mexico seashore than skimboards, seafood and sun-bathing bronzed bodies: there is solitude. There are vast stretches of uninhabited or unfrequented beaches lounging serenely beside a roiling sea that stretches westward seemingly into infinity. read more

Ask an old gringo about knife sharpening, a new college, Trump and things to like about Mexico Marvin West

afilador de cuchillo
There is a better way to sharpen your knife. Education can be expensive - for investors. The USA Presidential nomination process crosses the border - Not. How to gain wealth without working too hard. 'Tis the season to be juicy - Mangos and all the local drippings about a new hospital. read more

Something for Nothing - A novel by Robert Richter Reviewed by James Tipton

Robert Richter’s new novel, Something for Nothing, is his third featuring Cotton Waters, ‘not your ordinary roving gringo’, who is called Algo by his Mexican buddies, shortened from the Spanish word for Cotton, algodón. Much of Robert Richter’s work is inspired by his 40-year love affair with Mexico. He has written three Cotton Waters mysteries (all available on Kindle): Something in Vallarta (1991), Something Like a Dream (2014), this latest, Something for Nothing (2015), all set on Mexico’s western Riviera. Richter has also written two non-fiction books about Mexico: Search for the Camino Real: A History of San Blas and the Road to Get There (2011) and Cuautémoc Cárdenas and the Roots of Mexico’s New Democracy (2000). read more

Traditional Food Festival in Morelia David Haun

Run, don't walk to the next Michoacan Traditional Food Festival (Cocineras Tradicionales) at the Convention Center in Morelia. The entrance is a stairway to heaven and you are about to eat food fit for gods and goddesses. The name "Traditional" only partially describes the Festival because it is traditional woman, in traditional clothing, cooking traditional recipes, with traditional utensils. However,...

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Jocotepec blessed with one sharp historian Marvin West

Marsha kept her own horse, Marie-Elena, in the village. On this overcast day in summer 1966, she rode for miles along the shore. She bred Marie-Elena with a stallion from Jocotepec.
 
 
Photo in family collection of Marsha Sorensen; all rights reserved.
 
Aida exudes authenticity. She actually lives in Jocotepec. She was born there, last in a sizable flock of 13 children. Her father's family goes back to before the Spanish came calling. Her grandfather was shot during the Revolution. That is historic! read more

Living at Lake Chapala Reviewed by James Tipton

Judy King's Living at Lake Chapala is a must have book for any expatriate living at Lake Chapala, and it is a very useful book for any expatriate anywhere in Mexico.

It is a book to keep beside the bed, or on the coffee table, or even on the car seat.

Arranged in six parts, the 76 chapters tell you just about everything you could want to know about living the Mexico adventure.

At the very beginning of Living at Lake Chapala, Judy tells us "This is the book I needed when I arrived in Mexico." It might be the book you need as well.... read more

Mexico success story: San Quintin Escuela Marvin West

Tennessee teachers at San Quintin primary school
© Marvin West, 2014
How this very rural elementary school has risen from nothing to something special is a stunning success story. The small Nayarit village in the foothills of the Sierra de Vallejo mountains, just 40 kilometers from downtown Puerto Vallarta, is a different world.

It is not distinctive and has been that way for generations.

Until Edd Bissell, by the grace of God or a quirk of fate, discovered the school and adopted it, nobody — nobody — had ever been beyond sixth grade. Today, a young woman is in her senior year of college architecture and several youth are in high school.,,. read more

Something Like a Dream James Tipton

Something Like a Dream by Robert Richter

Much of the novel, which takes place in 1982, is about the Huichols and Richter means "to introduce the reader to the Huichol people, their culture and religious life centered on peyote visions…."

For the Huichol, "the sacred and the secular are the same world, real and physical, enrapturing and mystical. Body, mind, and spirit; corn, deer, and peyote; nothing separates the idea from the daylight or the dream. It is all the same."

As in the finest of adventure stories — from The Odyssey to the present — Robert Richter´s protagonist, Cotton Waters, "Algo," is a seemingly ordinary man, not particularly successful in the eyes of the world, who for complicated reasons accepts a journey that has extraordinary challenges and that will change him forever...

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Journey to Patamban, Michoacan Allan Cogan

The Fiesta de Cristo Rey has become as famous as many of the Day of the Dead rites in other communities around Mexico. It's the peak of the flower growing season in Michoacán and the residents not only gather the flowers to decorate the streets but they also paint the streets with incredible and startling floral designs. read more

Arroyo El Carbon in Guadalajara's Primavera Forest John Pint

In most places, a straight line is the shortest distance between two points, but not in many parts of Jalisco's Primavera Forest, located at the western edge of Guadalajara, Mexico's second-biggest cit... read more

Baby Boomers: Reinvent Your Retirement in Mexico Reviewed by Elaine Halleck

Book lovers, especially those contemplating retirement near Lake Chapala, will enjoy Karen Blue's conversational interviews in Baby Boomers: Reinvent Your Retirement in Mexico.

But my guess is that the book may be more attractive to people who have already moved south and want to know what makes their fellow expats tick, and maybe pick up a few nuggets of practical information in the process.

Each short chapter in the 215-page softcover focuses on one person or couple who, in most cases, use only their first name.

Yet, with only that thin cloak of anonymity, the interviewees pretty much pour out their hearts, and the author gets in a fair amount of personal details about her background and her nearly 20 years living the expat life in the Lake Chapala area... read more

Geology of Guadalajara's Primavera Forest: A Peace Corps volunteer's passionate tribute John Pint

On Wednesday, March 6, 2013, the first book ever on the geology of the Primavera Forest was launched at ITESO University in Guadalajara. La Apasionante Geología del Área de Protección de Flora y Fauna La Primavera was written by U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer and geologist Barbara Dye during her two years of service at the woodland sanctuary... read more

Amazing medical mission to Mexico Reviewed by Marvin West

Mr. Alexander Dumas

Stan Brock, an unusual Englishman made semi-famous by his role in the TV series Wild Kingdom, had founded something called Remote Area Medical and was soliciting volunteers for a three-week mission to one of the Tuxpans somewhere in the mountains of Mexico.

He described the poverty, misery and misfortune that plagued the small village. He talked of deadly disease and infant mortality. His plea for the primitive Indians, the Huichols, may have actually triggered a few tears among the tough military trainees...

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Guide to the Birds of the Primavera Forest Reviewed by John Pint

The Illustrated Guide to the Birds of the Primavera Forest by Oscar Reyna is available from the Primavera Park Service in Guadalajara, Mexico
© John Pint, 2014
The Primavera Forest is a protected area of oak and pine trees covering over 36,000 hectares, located due west of Guadalajara, Mexico's second largest city. In 2010, the administrators of the forest published "Aves del Bosque La Primavera-Guía Ilustrada" (Illustrated Guide to the Birds of the Primavera Forest) by Oscar Reyna Bustos. Nature photographer Jesús Moreno described the book as "The fruit of many years of hard work and a great deal of time spent in the field..." read more

Mexico berries are the "in" thing Marvin West

Corn field near Jocotepec, Mexico
© Daniel Wheeler, 2014
Corn was the crop of choice 17 years ago when we landed in Mexico, on the shores of Lake Chapala. Everybody who had a patch of ground had a corn patch. More land, more corn, some for tamales, some for farm animals, some for the market.

A surge in tequila sales created a shortage of agave. Now, Berries are the "in" thing. In much of Jalisco and some of Michoacan.... read more

San Patricio by the Sea on Mexico's Pacific coast Marvin West

San Patricio by the Sea, an interdenominational community church on Mexico's Pacific coast
© Marvin West, 2014
As churches go, San Patricio by the Sea is an intriguing addition in the low-rent district.

It had a humble beginning, born of need in the late 1990s.

There were hundreds, maybe a few thousands, of Americans and Canadians, residents and snowbirds, in the region but no religious services in English for many, many miles along the west bank, nothing from El Tecuan to Manzanillo and beyond... read more

A Brief Guide to Mexico's Primavera Forest John Pint

Guadalajara, Mexico's second-largest city happens to be situated right next to a beautiful pine and oak forest covering more than 36,000 hectares (139 square miles). For as long as anyone can remember,... read more

A cabin near Puerto Vallarta David Kimball

Seven US presidents were born in log cabins. The most notable, of course, was Lincoln. During elections, all of them were quick to remind the public of their humble frontier origins with fulsome refere... read more
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