MexConnect
All articles for region “Oaxaca”
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Mexico's endless Pacific beach: sun, surf, sand, seafood and solitude Gerry Soroka

There's more to the Mexico seashore than skimboards, seafood and sun-bathing bronzed bodies: there is solitude. There are vast stretches of uninhabited or unfrequented beaches lounging serenely beside a roiling sea that stretches westward seemingly into infinity. read more

Mexican mezcal in the global spirits market: Unrivalled complexity, innumerable nuances Reviewed by William B. Kaliher

Mexican mezcal in the global spirits market: Unrivalled complexity, innumerable nuances,
A Mexico book by Alvin Gary Starkman, M.A., J.D.
© Alvin Gary Starkman, M.A., J.D., 2014

Derived from the agave plant, mescal — or mezcal — has been enjoyed since before the Spanish conquest.

Most is produced in the Mexican state of Oaxaca and, as with so many distilled spirits, reveals distinct nuances in smoothness, smokiness and flavor.

How each producer distills is also unique to his facility and likely his family history of making mezcal. ondenser is kept cool through circulating it or by continuously using new cool water, and so on. No two traditional clay distillers or copper pot distillers use exactly the same recipe unless they are close family members.

A friend said, Alvin Starkman has written the best book on mezcal in the English language.... read more

Guelaguetza Maria Diaz

Monday, July 21, 2014, the colorful pageantry of Mexico's Guelaguetza is reenacted once again during the Lunes del Cerro (Mondays on the Hill. A Zapotec word signifying offering or offertory, Guelaguetza was the term used to describe the Oaxaca ceremony and celebration held each year to propitiate the gods in return for sufficient rain and a bountiful harvest. Today it is one of the most colorful fiestas in Mexico. read more

Mexican marinated mixed vegetable salad: Chileajo Karen Hursh Graber

When we lived in Oaxaca, I liked to go the food stands that were right outside the university faculties downtown, especially the school of architecture, which was right next to a small park, with plent... read more

Lenten traditions in Oaxaca: Our Lady of Sorrows Tara Lowry

A life-sized Virgin Mary statue with imploring, heaven-raised eyes welcomed me into the courtyard of my favourite café in Oaxaca, Mexico. Dozens of what looked to me to be chia pets surrounded her. Wh... read more

Oaxaca's Sierra Mixe: Exploring an ancient cuisine Karen Hursh Graber

Visiting some of the Mixe towns and villages — accessible only by rough, winding mountain roads, often unpaved — can seem like time travel. The Mixe name for themselves means "people who speak the mountain language," and this use of the ancient tongue, rather than Spanish, makes this particular time travel a bit more exotic. read more

Mixe meat and vegetable soup: Caldo mixe Karen Hursh Graber

  Although the Mixe do not eat meat on a daily, or even frequent, basis, they do go all out for a fiesta, and this rich, flavorful meat and vegetable soup soup uses as many kinds of meat as people ... read more

Oaxaca squash vine soup with corn dumplings: Sopa de guias con chochoyones Karen Hursh Graber

In Oaxaca, it is a rainy season staple and has been since before the Conquest. The only addition after the Spaniards arrived was the lard in the corn dough for the dumplings. read more

Oaxaca chile and garlic seasoning paste: Chintestle Karen Hursh Graber

If you live in or visit Oaxaca, by all means buy some pasilla de oaxaca chiles, sometimes called chile mixe. These have a much different taste from regular pasilla chiles. Although in the Mixe, this ch... read more

Dressing Baby Jesus: Dia de la Candelaria in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

All around town, people are carrying babies. It takes me a moment to realize, (mostly because they are swaddled in blankets) that they are not real babies but dolls. Then it takes me another moment and... read more

Paying tribute to Our Lady of Guadalupe in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

The Mestiza Madonna. La Virgen Ranchera. The Queen of the Americas. Mystical Rose… no matter what name she is called, one thing is for sure: the beloved Virgin of Guadalupe is the mother of all Mexic... read more

Mexican scrambled eggs with dried shrimp: Huevos revueltos con camarones secos Karen Hursh Graber

I went through several versions of Mexican scrambled eggs with dried shrimp, a common dish in Oaxaca's Isthmus region, to find my favorite. In the Isthmus, it is made with camarones oreados, or partial... read more

Oaxaca white beans with dried shrimp: Frijoles blancos con camaron seco Karen Hursh Graber

This recipe for white beans with dried shrimp from the southern Pacific coast of Oaxaca is adapted from Susana Trilling's wonderful regional cookbook, Seasons of My Heart. Use other beans, such as fava... read more

Radiant radishes: La Noche de Rabanos in Oaxaca Tara Lowry

For one night of the year in Oaxaca, Mexico, the Raphanus sativus, or radish as it is more commonly known, escapes its destiny as root vegetable side dish and becomes art. Thousands upon thousands of r... read more

In a God's Eye James Tipton

Gina is a "good deal older" than her circle of "newly retired women with educations, raised in the United States of America but now living in Mexico.

She helps her gardener with his English, takes pleasure in her garden, is fascinated by the old Mayan legends, grateful for the sacrifices of their gods, and holds sacred the food she receives.

A principle she lives by is this: "be thankful and say so regularly." She feels in her heart that this religious attitude is "much easier to grasp than the more intellectual, less sensory religions…." read more

Mexican beef chichilo by Pilar Cabrera: Chichilo de res por Pilar Cabrera Karen Hursh Graber

Mexican beef chichilo is probably the least known of Oaxaca's moles. It is one of the only instances where nearly burning the chile gives an intense, smoky taste to the finished product. Pilar Cabrera ... read more

Tehuantepec: Hold on to your sombrero Gerry Soroka

Wind farms in Tehuantepec, Mexico
The tehuano endlessly blows where North America stops. The tehuano, the unforgiving forever wind of the Isthmus of Tehauntepec, ceaselessly scours a path through the wide gap where the continent of North America ends and Central America starts. This narrow neck of land joining the Atlantic to the Pacific — once a candidate along with Panama for a deep sea canal — is about 35 miles from north to south. read more

Tejate: Drink of Aztec rulers and Zapotec gods Alvin Starkman

Tejate is a pre-Hispanic corn and cacao based drink. It is likely the only complex food recipe in all Mexico still enjoyed today just as it was thousands of years ago in Oaxaca. When visiting a Oaxaca... read more

July in Oaxaca: The Mexican pageantry of the Guelaguetza Alvin Starkman

Tehuana women in their elaborate traditional dress. © Oscar Encines, 2008
With pageantry unrivalled in all of Mexico, the Guelaguetza is the most colorful and exhilarating of the multitude of festivals in Oaxaca. And in a state with sixteen different indigenous cultures, each with its own unique traditions including language, food, music, dress and dance, it should come as no surprise that the annual two-week July extravaganza draws both Mexican nationals and tourists from all corners of the globe. read more

Mexico's Scorpion Mezcal empowers Oaxaca women Alvin Starkman

Erica is sitting in the office of her boss of eight years, Douglas French, owner of Scorpion Mezcal in San Agustín de las Juntas, Oaxaca. French has just informed her that she qualifies to become a pu... read more

Mexico's Frida Kahlo in Oaxaca Handicrafts Alvin Starkman

The Mexican state of Oaxaca is renowned for its handicrafts. From black pottery and handloomed Zapotec rugs to silverwork and alebrijes, the collector will find a wealth of beautiful handcrafted work. ... read more

Hierve el Agua: Bubbling springs and petrified waterfalls in Oaxaca, Mexico Alvin Starkman

Hierve el Agua is stunning, one of Oaxaca's most impressive attractions — and perhaps one of the most spectacular in the entire country. Yet, surprisingly, it is one of the least visited. With its bu... read more

Mexican rice and amaranth pudding: Arroz y amaranto con leche Karen Hursh Graber

This variation of the classic arroz con leche is served in Zimatlan, Oaxaca, one of the largest amaranth-producing areas in Mexico. The addition of popped amaranth grains adds nutrients as well ... read more

Christmas magic in Oaxaca: A multi-faceted experience of culture & tradition Alvin Starkman

Oaxaca is magical — its history, culture, art, architecture and folklore. The traditional Guelaguetza, celebrated in July, is a quintessential expression of Oaxaca tradition. Now, Noches Magicas de G... read more

Mexican Oaxaca-style lentils: Lentejas oaxaqueñas Karen Hursh Graber

This spicy-sweet, meatless main dish is traditional Oaxacan Lenten fare. The combination of spices with fruit is characteristic of southern Mexican cooking. Lentils are one of the fastest-cooking legum... read more
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