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All articles for region “Oaxaca”
Showing 26—50 of 257 results

Oaxacan yellow mole: Amarillo Karen Hursh Graber

Called simply (and fondly) "amarillo," this Oaxacan mole dish is a specialty of the Central Valleys region of this southern Mexico state. Although usually made with chicken, it is one of the few mol... read more

Ecotourism in Mexico: Arroyo Guacamaya, Ixtlan and the Sierra Norte of Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Arroyo Guacamaya is one of the closest ecotourism sites to the City of Oaxaca, accessible by private vehicle in about an hour, or via public transportation. La Guacamaya has most if not all of the fea... read more

Medical and dental treatment and coverage in Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Aside from the small, private hospitals, often referred to as clínicas, there are four publicly funded and insurance-based hospitals in the city, as well as a hospital just outside of the city offering specialized treatment for a number of serious ailments. There is the Red Cross facility available to all, often used for emergency treatment only. The civic hospital provides free services or treatment at a modest cost based on a sliding scale respecting means. ISSSTE is a federally funded facility restricted to government employees who are members of a union. Finally, there is IMSS... read more

The Oaxaca Lending Library and Community Center Alvin Starkman

The Oaxaca Lending Library (OLL) has been in existence for over 40 years, and is one of the largest English language libraries in all of Mexico. Over the past decade it has grown into a vibrant community center, in large part due to the dedication of its many volunteers. read more

Children's cooking classes at Mexico's Casa de los Sabores in Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

What better way to begin a series of children's cooking classes than with pizza and mango smoothies? Chef Pilar Cabrera's Casa de los Sabores began their inaugural class with the basics of kitchen safe... read more

Looms, weavers and the sacred snail on Mexico's Costa Chica Geri Anderson

"Don Luis, aquí. Aquí, Don Luis," yelled a group of white-shirted men. They were calling for passengers in the camionera central in Pinotepa Nacional near the border of Oaxaca and Guerrero. We had d... read more

A Oaxaca culinary ambassador: an interview with Chef Pilar Cabrera Karen Hursh Graber

On a recent trip to Oaxaca, I had the pleasure of speaking with Pilar Cabrera, chef, cooking instructor and, most recently, participant in Iron Chef Canada. Chef Cabrera kindly took time out from her busy schedule to sit down and discuss the influences that led to this career, as well as her cooking school, ever-changing menus at her restaurant, La Olla, and experiences in helping to bring the cuisine of Oaxaca to Canada. read more

Oaxaca salad by Pilar Cabrera: Ensalada Oaxaca por Pilar Cabrera Karen Hursh Graber

Pilar Cabrera, chef, cooking instructor and, most recently, participant in Iron Chef Canada, shares this recipe with Mexconnect readers. Ingredients 250 grams (about ½ pound) of organic lettuc... read more

Tamarind Chipotle Dressing by Pilar Cabrera: Aderezo de tamarindo y chipotle por Pilar Cabrera Karen Hursh Graber

Pilar Cabrara created this dressing was designed for her exclusive Oaxaca Salad. Ingredients 100 ml (about 3 fluid ounces) adobo sauce (from a can of chipotles in adobo) 250 ml (about 8 fl... read more

Reynaldo in Mexico has handwoven Oaxaca rugs and more rugs Marvin West

Reynaldo the Rugman has a problem. He and his relatives have made more rugs (beautiful colors, skillful weaving) than he can sell. Reynaldo Vasquez Hernandez is a fifth or sixth-generation artisan in spring, summer and autumn and a traveling salesman — representing the entire clan — in winter. read more

Tattoo artists in Oaxaca: a lawyer and a fine arts graduate make strange bedfellows with tatuadores Alvin Starkman

Lawyer Kaireddyn ("Kai") Orta began fabricating his own, rudimentary tools for making tattoos in 1996, while still in high school here in Oaxaca, Mexico. One day, a neighbor saw him carrying a shoe box, and asked him what was in it. Kai showed him the adapted motor, needles, ink and other paraphernalia. The neighbor was the recipient of Kai's first tattoo. Kai then began doing tattoos for his schoolmates. read more

The state of Oaxaca, Mexico - resource page Mexconnect Staff

Located in the southern part of Mexico, the state of Oaxaca is bordered to the north by the states of Puebla and Veracruz, to the east by Chiapas, to the west by Guerrero, and to the south by the Pacif... read more

CORAL: Non-profit center in Oaxaca assists hearing impaired Mexican children Alvin Starkman

When the Cole-Gardner family recently vacationed in Oaxaca, Mexico, they brought along several basketballs, soccer balls and baseball gloves, to donate to indigenous children without ready access to su... read more

Cooking in Puerto Escondido: Fish and fruit from Mexico's tropics Karen Hursh Graber

fresh fish in Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca
Two of the biggest buzzwords in today's media-dominated culinary world are "fresh" and "local," and on a recent visit to Mexico's southern Pacific coast, we found the food to be both. Taking advantage of the region's abundant fresh ingredients, we shopped, cooked and ate our way through the beach town of Puerto Escondido. read more

Women potters of San Marcos Tlapazola, Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Every Sunday Gloria awakens at 3:00 a.m., and begins preparing tejate, a frothy, tasty corn and cacao based drink, which she will offer for sale in the Tlacolula market. A couple of hours later, her si... read more

Mexico's Black heritage: the Costa Chica of Guerrero and Oaxaca Bobby Vaughn

The Amuzgo people of Mexico's Costa Chica. Most of the homes in the region were round mud huts, whose roots have been  traced back to what is now Ghana and the Ivory Coast.
© Bobby Vaughn, 2006
The Costa Chica ("Short Coast" in Spanish) is one of two regions in Mexico with significant Black communities, the other being the state of Veracruz on the Gulf coast. The Costa Chica is a 200-mile long coastal region beginning just southeast of Acapulco, Guererrero, and ending near the town of Puerto Angel, Oaxaca. read more

Guelaguetza Maria Diaz

Monday, July 26, 2010, the colorful pageantry of Mexico's Guelaguetza is reenacted once again during the Lunes del Cerro (Mondays on the Hill. A Zapotec word signifying offering or offertory, Guelaguetza was the term used to describe the Oaxaca ceremony and celebration held each year to propitiate the gods in return for sufficient rain and a bountiful harvest. Today it is one of the most colorful fiestas in Mexico. read more

Four Days in the Oaxaca State Prison John McClelland

At 9:15 a.m. on February 3, 2010, I steeled myself to enter the Central Penitentiary in Oaxaca, Mexico. Having heard stories of overcrowding, rampant drug use, filthy conditions, torture, inadequate fo... read more

Mexico's Mezcal Monkey: collectible ceramic folk art from Oaxaca Alvin Starkman


A hot collector's item, the ceramic mezcal monkey is designed to hold mescal, the spirit distilled from the baked, then fermented agave plant.
© Alvin Starkman, 2010
Designed to hold mescal, the Chango Mezcalero has become a very collectible folk art item whose history has been recounted infrequently, if at all. While by all accounts it originated in the State of Oaxaca, home of mezcal — the spirit distilled from the baked, then fermented agave plant — it's now highly sought after by collectors residing much further abroad.

The traditional Mezcal Monkey was used to hold, display and/or gift mezcal. The clay bottle is just that, usually with a stopper made of cork, or a small piece of corn cob. read more

The Isthmus: Stories from Mexico's Past, 1495-1995 Reviewed by James Tipton

The Isthmus: Stories from Mexico's Past, 1495-1995 by Bruce Stores
The Isthmus of Tehuantepec is "without a doubt strategically significant as it provides a narrow land bridge between the Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. But it is nowhere near Mexico's major cities or the beaten tourist track." Bruce Stores presents the historical material through a series of stories in The Isthmus, Stories from Mexico's Past, 1495-1995. It is a work, the author acknowledges, of "historical fiction." For me, because I love stories, the history then became fascinating. read more

Enrique Flores: Philanthropic Oaxaca artist has the golden touch Alvin Starkman

Magical nude by Oaxaca artisa Enrique Flores
© Alvin Starkman, 2009
Enrique Flores is one of the most prolific Mexican artists of his generation. Of course having been mentored by the late great master of contemporary Mexican art, Rodolfo Morales, hasn't hurt; nor has the fact that two of Oaxaca's most prominent art galleries, Indigo and Arte de Oaxaca, were his patrons for many years. But there's no substitute for hard work, talent, and vision. read more

Seat belt, cell phone and speed limit laws are enforced in Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Driving in Oaxaca, Mexico, became a little more difficult in September / October, 2009. That's when federal, state and municipal governments actually began enforcing the law, at least in the City of O... read more

Fiona Dunnett: images of self and death in Oaxaca Alvin Starkman

Comic strips, a young Canadian's self portraits, and photographs of violent deaths in a Mexican daily newspaper, make strange bedfellows. But they constitute a major part of the driving force for the c... read more

Corn, beans and squash: the life cycle of the milpa Karen Hursh Graber

The milpa, or cornfield, is probably the most important element in the life of the rural Mexican farmer, apart from his family, or maybe alongside his family, because the milpa represents generations of his people working the soil. Even in places where agricultural production has been industrialized to the point of overshadowing any importance a milpa might have had before, the campesino continues to work his plot of land, however small, following the cycle of tilling, sowing and harvesting that his forefathers did. read more

Case study from Oaxaca, Mexico: Am I paying my staff too much? Alvin Starkman

Day of The Dead is upon us in Oaxaca, and Juanita's hotel still has rooms available for one of the busiest times of the year. The City of Oaxaca, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Southern Mexico, relies on tourism for its very existence. Juanita is trying to figure out where she went wrong, realizing that Día de Los Muertos should top up her bank balance, just like the Christmas season, the summertime festival weeks known as Guelaguetza, and Easter. Time and again she asks herself, "Am I paying my staff too much?" read more
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