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Abraham Lincoln and Mexico: A history of courage, intrigue and unlikely friendships Reviewed by Rita Pomade

Cover image of Dr. Michael Hogan's Abraham Lincoln and Mexico.
The United States and Mexico struggled through volatile years of suffering and carnage to become unified nations. Michael Hogan’s thoroughly researched and passionately written "Abraham Lincoln and Mexico" is a thought-provoking read that covers part of that struggle from 1822, when Americans settlers first arrived on Mexican territory, to 1867, when Mexico finally freed itself from France’s intrusion into its territory. The nineteenth century was a turbulent period in American and Mexican history. read more

Mexico miracle: Anabel Hernandez Marvin West

Investigative journalist Anabel Hernandez Garcia
© Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung, 2009
Anabel is a journalist known for intensive investigations. She has written newspaper and magazine articles about slave labor, sexual exploitation, political corruption and the drug machine. She has written one really hot book, Los Señores del Narco.

Anabel won the Golden Pen of Freedom Award for 2012, presented by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers. read more

The "virreinato" of New Spain

This is page 5 of seven on MexConnect which come originally from the website of CEDEX (Center for Historic Studies of Public Works and Town Planning) in Madrid, Spain. (Links to the other six pages ar... read more

Did You Know? Mexico tried to prevent Americans from migrating to Texas Tony Burton

Mexico once tried hard to prevent Americans from migrating to Texas. In recent years, considerable attention has focused on the U.S. government's efforts to stem the flow of Mexicans migrating north o... read more

The Devil's Highway: A True Story by Luis Alberto Urrea Reviewed by Allan Cogan

This is the story of a group of men who have become known as the Yuma 14. They are the fourteen illegal immigrants who died attempting to cross the Arizona border in May, 2001. And what a terrible and upsetting story it is. Unknown numbers of these illegal immigrants die every year making the dangerous crossing on foot over one of the most inhospitable stretches of terrain in the world. But the Yuma 14 constituted the largest known number of such immigrants to die at one time. read more

Opening Mexico: The Making of a Democracy by Julia Preston and Samuel Dillon Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Here is the history of Mexico in the last two or three decades - and what a history it is. It's the story of how a dictatorship eventually found its way toward becoming a democracy. As stories go, this one has everything - political corruption, student demonstrations leading to a massacre, earthquakes, citizen crusades, an Olympics and, as they say, much, much more. It looks as though it might even have a happy ending. read more

Francisco I. Madero 1873-1913

Born in Parras, Coahuila on October 30, 1873. Son of a wealthy landowner. Family was devoted to ranching, farming and commerce. Studied commerce and economics in France and agriculture in the U.S. Saw ... read more

The Annexation of Mexico: From the Aztecs to the Imf, One Reporter's Journey through History by John Ross Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Ross, a social activist, poet and working reporter based in Mexico City, has a lively and irreverent style. It makes his book an enjoyable read, despite the sometimes heavy material. His thesis is that outsiders, and most especially the United States, have never stopped trying to control or annex "this enormously rich, indescribably poor nation" in one way or another for centuries. Usually this was accomplished through plain old land-grabbing. Today the process continues through economic instruments such as indebtedness, NAFTA and the war on drugs. read more

Yesterday's Train: A Rail Odyssey through Mexican History by Terry Pindell with Lourdes Ramirez Mallis Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Author Pindell and Dr. Lourdes Ramírez Mallis, who served as Pindell's interpreter, collaborator and researcher, set out together on a lengthy train journey covering all of Mexico. I should also add that Terry Pindell has written similar books about train journeys in Canada and the U.S. As they travel, we're treated to dissertations on the various locales as well as a fairly serious coverage of Mexican history and the character of the people. read more

Alone at the top: The achievement of Mexico's Alvaro Obregon Jim Tuck

Revolution is the ultimate test for survival of the fittest. In times of stormy social change, intense competition is generated among leaders of forces seeking that change and, inevitably, one man emer... read more

High hopes, baffling uncertainty: Mexico nears the millennium Jim Tuck

The election that brought Miguel de la Madrid's successor to power was clearly fraudulent. On July 6, 1988, when the first results began to arrive at the interior ministry's office on Avenida Bucareli,... read more

Pancho Villa 1878-1923

Mexconnect writers explore the many faces of Francisco "Pancho" Villa, a key figure in the Mexican Revolution. read more
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