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Mexico's Black heritage: the Costa Chica of Guerrero and Oaxaca Bobby Vaughn

The Amuzgo people of Mexico's Costa Chica. Most of the homes in the region were round mud huts, whose roots have been  traced back to what is now Ghana and the Ivory Coast.
© Bobby Vaughn, 2006
The Costa Chica ("Short Coast" in Spanish) is one of two regions in Mexico with significant Black communities, the other being the state of Veracruz on the Gulf coast. The Costa Chica is a 200-mile long coastal region beginning just southeast of Acapulco, Guererrero, and ending near the town of Puerto Angel, Oaxaca. read more

Yaqui in exile: the grim history of Mexico's San Marcos train station John Pint

An old railway station at the western end of the train tracks in Jalisco, Mexico, bears witness to unspeakable cruelties perpetrated upon thousands of Yaqui Indians in the early 1900s.Yaquis were sold as slaves at the station "for 25 centavos a head." read more

Campeche: on the edge of the Maya world John P. Schmal

Located in the southwestern portion of the Yucatán Peninsula along the Gulf of Mexico, the State of Campeche was named after the ancient Maya Kingdom of Ah Kin Pech (Canpech). For thousands of years, the Yucatec Maya has been the dominant Mayan language throughout the Yucatán Peninsula, including Campeche, Yucatán, and Quintana Roo. read more

Are you related to the Aztecs? John P. Schmal

For five centuries, North Americans have been fascinated and intrigued by stories of the magnificent Aztec Empire. This extensive Mesoamerican Empire was in its ascendancy during the late Fifteenth and... read more

The indigenous past of Zacatecas John P. Schmal

Millions of Americans today look to the Mexican state of Zacatecas as their ancestral homeland. But it is very difficult to locate historical information on Zacatecas in the English language media. As ... read more

Ojo Del Lago - The Tarahumaras: And Endangered Species Shep Lenchek

Never conquered by the Aztecs and despite being defeated by Mexican armies, the Tarahumaras still consider themselves an independant nation. So strong is this conviction that in the Fifties they more t... read more

San Miguel and the War of Independence by Mamie Spiegel Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Ms. Spiegel's account mainly covers what she calls the viceregal period, also known as the colonial era, which lasted from 1521 to 1821. Mexico at that time was the richest and most populous of Spain's overseas dominions. It was at the end of this period, in 1810, that the War of Independence erupted with San Miguel and the nearby town of Dolores being the focal points of that outbreak. The war was to last eleven years. read more

The Tarasco culture and empire

Among the fertile volcanoes of Michoacan Lumholtz came across the Purepecha people, who were called Tarascan by the Spanish. Enemies of the Aztecs, the Tarascans flourished from 1100 A.D. to 1530 A.D. ... read more

The Maya Civilization, Maya Numerals And Calendar Luis Dumois

Mayan Numeric System Ancient Maya discovered two fundamental ideas in mathematics: positional value and the concept of zero. This feat was accomplished by only one other great culture of antiquity, th... read more

Bobby Vaughn's homepage: Afro-Mexicans of Costa Chica Bobby Vaughn

Afro-Mexicans of the Costa Chica   The purpose of these web pages is to introduce you to the culture and unique experience of Mexicans of African descent. If you are like most pe... read more

Sixteenth century indigenous Jalisco John P. Schmal

Jalisco is La Madre Patria (the Mother Country) for millions of Mexican Americans. Given this fact, it makes sense that many sons and daughters of Jalisco are curious about the cultural and linguistic ... read more

Yesterday's Train: A Rail Odyssey through Mexican History by Terry Pindell with Lourdes Ramirez Mallis Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Author Pindell and Dr. Lourdes Ramírez Mallis, who served as Pindell's interpreter, collaborator and researcher, set out together on a lengthy train journey covering all of Mexico. I should also add that Terry Pindell has written similar books about train journeys in Canada and the U.S. As they travel, we're treated to dissertations on the various locales as well as a fairly serious coverage of Mexican history and the character of the people. read more

The Aztecs speak - an Aztec account of the Conquest of Mexico Shep Lenchek

An Aztec account of the Conquest of Mexico? Preposterous. It is common knowledge that those manuscripts that escaped destruction by the Conquistadors were gathered up under the direction of the first ... read more

Wild Steps of Heaven Reviewed by Allan Cogan

The setting of the story is around 1910, the time of the Mexican Revolution and the war is an ever-present background to the story. It's a time when great cruelties were imposed on the Indian populace by the country's rulers. Indeed, genocide is the only word you could use to describe what happened. The villain of the piece is a colonel of the Rurales who makes it his personal mission to see that every Indian dies in the most hideous fashion possible. As villains go, this one is a real bastard. read more

Aztec Autumn Reviewed by Allan Cogan

Readers of these reviews may remember that I was a big fan of Jenning’s previous work, Aztec. I gave it my highest accolade – five stars. And here comes the sequel, which is almost as good. The action in this one takes place 12 years after all the goings on in Aztec and concerns the adventures of 18 year old Tenamixtli, the son of Mixtli, the hero of the former novel. Indeed, in the first chapter, Tenamixtli witnesses an execution, a burning at the stake publicly carried out by Spanish troops. Later, he discovers that the executed man was his father. How’s that for getting a story started? As you can imagine, revenge plays a big part in the plot. read more

The Maya Civilization, references Luis Dumois

REFERENCES De la Garza, Mercedes, y León-Portilla, Miguel, Literatura Maya. Compilación de textos: Popol Vuh, Memorial de Sololá, Libro de Chilam Balam de Chumayel, Rabinal Achí, L... read more

La Civilizacion Maya , Referencias Y Sitios En La Red Mundial Luis Dumois

REFERENCIAS ( Sitios Redes) De la Garza, Mercedes, y León-Portilla, Miguel, Literatura Maya. Compilación de textos: Popol Vuh, Memorial de Sololá, Libro de Chila... read more

La Civilización Maya, Numerales y Calendario Mayas Luis Dumois

Numerales y Calendario Mayas   Sistema numérico Los antiguos mayas descubrieron dos ideas fundamentales en matemáticas: el valor posicional y el cero. Sólo otra gran cultura de la antigü... read more

The Preclassic or Formative Period ( 1500 BC - 300 AD ) Dale Hoyt Palfrey

The Formative Period begins with the first appearance of pottery and ends with the rise of the Teotihuacan and Mayan civilizations. It was an epoch marked by the emergence of effective agriculture, the... read more

The Post Classic Period ( 900 - 1521 ) Part 1 Dale Hoyt Palfrey

While data on early Mesoamerican cultures has been deduced primarily from archaeological evidence, historians have utilized the written records of later cultures to produce the final chapters of pre-hi... read more

The Classic Period (300-900 AD) Part 2: Cholula Dale Hoyt Palfrey

The most important center of the Mexican highlands after the fall of Teotihuacan was Cholula, near the twin volcanic peaks Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl and the city of Puebla. The Great Pyramid there,... read more

African Roots Stretch Deep Into Mexico Patrisia Gonzales and Roberto Rodriguez

March 3, 1996 -- In Mexico, various Indian peoples still play ancient instruments. And their songs and dances -- which tell of uprisings against their masters -- pay tribute to their ancestors. The... read more
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