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Cartonería: The Mexican art of papier mache Leigh Thelmadatter

Just about all documentation on cartonería stops with Pedro Linares, who died in 1992. His family continues the tradition he set and has become something of the standard among many collectors and institutions. Cartoneria is growing, both taking back areas in which it had disappeared and being introduced to areas in the far north and south which did not have the craft in the first place. The publication of Mexican Cartonería: Paper, Paste and Fiesta is an important step in giving the craft and its artisans the attention they deserve. read more

Wheels Up: A Novel of Drugs, Cartels and Survival Reviewed by Lynda L. Lock

Wheels Up: A Novel of Drugs, Cartels and Survival
 
Wheels-up: A Novel of Drugs, Cartels and Survival, is Jeanine Kitchel's fast-paced debut novel in her cartel trilogy. Mexico aficionado and prolific writer Kitchel will transport you into the heart of the drug cartel business. Zooming from cities to jungles and haciendas located in Mexico, Colombia, and Guatemala, the story will keep you wondering what could possibly happen next.

When El Patron, the head of the Culiacan Cartel in Sinaloa, Mexico, is imprisoned and the men in direct-line for succession are either dead or unsuitable, his niece Layla Navarro is chosen as his replacement. Layla's vivid descriptions of life inside the double-crossing, brutal existence of the Mexican drug cartels are precisely as I imagined.

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Trouble Isla Reviewed by Jeanine Lee Kitchel

Trouble Isla by Lynda L. Lock
Do you want to be transported to a small island in the Mexican Caribbean and follow the ongoing adventure of two feisty young women who accidentally uncover a notorious pirate's secret in an ancient cemetery during Mexico's Day of the Dead celebration?

Trouble Isla, Lynda L. Lock's second book in her Isla Mujeres Mystery Series, will allow you to do just that. Complete with a quirky cast of local characters, centering around Loco Lobo, the restaurant-bar where Yasmin and Jessica work,... read more

The Masks Of Mexico (Part 1) Rita Pomade

"While we are alive, we cannot escape from
masks or names. We are inseparable from
our fictions - our features."
Octavio Paz

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Tears from the Crown of Thorns: The Easter Passion Play in San Miguel de Allende Reviewed by Allan Cogan

"People unfamiliar with the Latin culture are curious, confused, and sometimes repulsed by the emphasis on suffering in religious figures. During Easter in North America, the focus is on the resurrection and the delights of spring. The event is concerned with the awe of transformation. There is resistance to facing the suffering that is a major part of this epic…." read more

Artist Richard Hay Reagan (1929-2012) first visited Mexico in the 1950s Tony Burton

In the mid-1950s, after temporary jobs in California, Rick sought artistic inspiration in Mexico. He used GI Bill funds (then about $110 a month) to study art at Mexico City College, where he also taught and exhibited. More than once he spent time painting in the small fishing village of La Ventosa, in Oaxaca. read more

Artist Richard Hay Reagan (1929-2012) revisted Mexico in 1970 Tony Burton

Richard Reagan undoubtedly had artistic talent, but despite his creativity and enviable work ethic, he always lived in the moment and never planned ahead. This makes it all the more important that this quietly-spoken "true artist", one who was never willing to compromise his artistic integrity, is not forgotten. read more

Personal reminiscences of Mexico's Huichol people I: A disappearing way of life? Ronald A. Barnett ©

Huichol artisan teaches his grandson
I began to discover that certain vested interests involving the Huichol did not welcome outsiders. There was almost a political rivalry among various individuals and groups who regarded the Huichol as their own private preserve. This sense of proprietary rights by over the Huichol was confirmed later when I went to Mexico City. Back then there was intense rivalry among people working with the Huichol., too. read more

Leonora Carrington in Mexico City: perspective of a person, place, and time Rita Pomade

In 1966, the Mexican Olympic Committee contacted my husband with a proposal: To photograph the most talented and notable of Mexico's creative community. Among those he was to photograph was the highly acclaimed and brilliant artist, Leonora Carrington, a woman as well-known for her eccentricities as for her creative output. Leonora took to my husband immediately and invited him to one of her famous dinners. "Bring your wife," she said. read more

I Love Baja! Reviewed by James Tipton

I Love Baja book cover
The title of Mikel Miller's new book, I Love Baja!, was inspired by locals who again and again told him, "I love Baja!". These same locals, reading this new edition of I Love Baja!, are probably saying, "I love Mikel's book," because it is written by a former resident who indeed knows and loves Baja... but it is also useful to those already living there and, in fact, fascinating to all Mexico aficionados... read more
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