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patricio_lintz


Oct 26, 2006, 5:12 PM

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Yeast we forget!

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Yeast is only available in Gringo groceries such as Superlake and el Dorito :} Then it's $30 pesos for enough to make two loaves.

What do locals do? I think they buy at Panaderias where people have time to bake or at Soriana for second rate baked goods.

I have been studying the subject, in particularly Sourdough Recipes and Beer bread recipes. Anyone have some good Sourdough recipes made with local air borne yeast and other Chapala organisms?

I have a sourdough starter going. I may have ruined it by experimenting with additives- raisons and beer. I tend to be impatient.



jennifer rose

Oct 26, 2006, 5:28 PM

Post #2 of 24 (6525 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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" Yeast is only available in Gringo groceries such as Superlake and el Dorito :}"


Nonsense! You may actually have to look and ask, but yeast is available at superstores such as Walmart and Comercial Mexicana. As well as at bakery supply stores.


MazDee

Oct 26, 2006, 6:41 PM

Post #3 of 24 (6515 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Anónimo will know! He bakes bread all the time. I think many supermarkets have it, but don't look for the little packets that they sell NOB. I bought a little jar of dried yeast last year, and it still is unopened. Probably dead by now. When I bought it, I had some rye flour which I had brought down from the states months before, with the intention that when the weather cooled I would try to bake Jewish rye. But when I opened the package, it was full of weavils. Yuck. I tossed the flour, so one of these days I will test the yeast. (Now I keep flour in the refri for the occasional use. If I want to bake bread, I will buy more then, not ahead of time! Anon lives in a cooler clime so won't have this problem).


patricio_lintz


Oct 26, 2006, 7:58 PM

Post #4 of 24 (6509 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Yeast we forget!

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Walmart is an hour bus ride away from Chapala. I have no idea where Comercial Mexicana is. I know there is one in Puerto Vallarta. Must be one in Maz also.


My post obviously was limited to Lakeside.

I am still looking for recipes.


(This post was edited by patricio_lintz on Oct 26, 2006, 8:00 PM)


Anonimo

Oct 27, 2006, 8:29 AM

Post #5 of 24 (6490 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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I don't know about availability of yeast at Lakeside, but in Pátzcuaro, we find it in the supermercados, in various sizes as well as fresh, compressed yeast in some of the tiendas de abarrotes. I even bought some fresh yeast, cut to order, in a productos lacteos shop in the mercado. Oddly enough, I can't find it in Costco in Morelia, and Wal Mart has only small envelopes within a box.

I think that there is a lot of home baking in and around Patzcuaro, or else a lot of folks are putting it into their septic systems.

Just back from 3 weeks + in the estados unidos, and I need to bake bread.

Buen provecho,
Anonimo


thriftqueen

Oct 27, 2006, 10:23 AM

Post #6 of 24 (6475 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Any major grocery store in Mexico sells yeast. It is located in the area of the cake mixes, salt, etc. It comes in small square like packaging. The packages I've saw are Mexican brand and the package is an off white color. I have not tried it.


Anonimo

Oct 27, 2006, 3:50 PM

Post #7 of 24 (6463 views)

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Re: [thriftqueen] Yeast we forget!

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Here, one of our major local supermarkets, "Super Codallos". has it on the counter in the deli department.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


patricio_lintz


Oct 27, 2006, 6:15 PM

Post #8 of 24 (6456 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Yeast we forget!

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Thanks everybody. No Collados in town. Just a Soriana, I can always go to Ajijic and pay $30 pesos an envelope. But that's cheaper than the $68 peso ride back and forth to Guadalajara.

Actually, I have been reading about our grandmothers' approach-sourdough.

I will try some. May fail, but I'll try till I get it right.


Anonimo

Oct 27, 2006, 6:29 PM

Post #9 of 24 (6455 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Patricio; have you considered going to a panadería and asking to buy some there? I have recently bought flour, and many years ago, yeast, at bakeries.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


sfmacaws


Oct 27, 2006, 10:18 PM

Post #10 of 24 (6445 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Patricio, I have some sourdough starter given to me by a friend 5 years ago, it still lives although I would guess that it has a lot of wild yeast spores in it by now. I don't bake bread with it, too messy and not enough room. I make pancakes, biscuits, corn bread, pizza dough and I once made chocolate chip cookies with it. I have some recipes I can send you if you like, some I got from friends and some I got online by googling sourdough.

I have heard that you can use yeast to make a sourdough starter and that it will pick up wild yeast over time. What I was told about mine was not to add anything but flour and water to the starter that you are keeping. So, if you are going to add other things to the recipe, you should first separate out your starter. I keep mine in the refrigerator in a clean mayonnaise jar that has holes drilled in the lid. It needs to be vented all the time. I feed it about once a week, usually I add flour and water to the starter at night, let it grow overnight, remove part of it to become the new starter and then make pancakes with the rest in the morning. I find that if I let it warm to room temperature before adding the feeder flour, it works better. I also let it grow overnight or for at least several hours before cooking with it. If I forget to feed it for several weeks, it will separate and the whey is a not very attractive grey liquid but it still works once fed and I haven't killed it yet.

Here's the info I received with the starter and a simple pancacke recipe. You can add all kinds of stuff to this recipe, I've substituted as much as half the flour with whole wheat flour or graham cracker crumbs or cream of wheat. I also add nuts and dried fruit or mashed bananas, whatever you have around.


Quote
This starter needs to be “fed” with flour and water every couple of days if you leave it out on the counter and about once a week if you keep it in the refrigerator. Stir in a little flour and enough water to keep the right consistency. If you keep it in the fridge, let it sit out and warm up for about 4 hours and then feed it. Leave it out after you feed it for an hour or two or until it starts to bubble.

Tips:
It works better if the starter has overnight to interact with ALL of the flour in a recipe.

If a recipe calls for milk instead of water, you can still let it sit out overnight. You should keep enough out to replenish your starter first, you only want flour and water in the starter you keep.


Sourdough Pancake Recipe


Put starter into a bowl and add enough flour and water to make the amount you want, plus a little more to put back into your starter keeper container. Let this stand in a warm place overnight, covered loosely.

The next day, add:

1 egg
½ tsp salt
1-2 Tbsp sugar
1 Tbsp oil

Mix all together. Then add 1 tsp baking soda mixed in 1 Tbsp water. After you add the water and baking soda mixture, the batter swells up and this is when you need to get it on the hot griddle really soon so that the pancakes are nice and light.



Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




patricio_lintz


Oct 28, 2006, 7:45 PM

Post #11 of 24 (6418 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Yeast we forget!

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Thanks. I think that I screwed up mine. I will start over with just rye flour and water. I will use the spoiled stuff for pancakes, mixing with flour, water & baking soda.

I will start a new batch out with a sterilized container/ croc.


sfmacaws


Oct 28, 2006, 8:24 PM

Post #12 of 24 (6412 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Let me know how the starter works with the rye flour, I was told to only use white flour in the starter or it would rot. I like using other flours but so far I've only fed the starter white. If you want I understand you can add a little bakers yeast to the starter if you don't get one from someone else, it gets it going with a good kind of yeast spores. Eventually, from what I understand, local spores will predominate. I've been told that my starter probably has very little of the original spores but is mostly ones it has picked up along the way.


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




Anonimo

Oct 29, 2006, 3:27 AM

Post #13 of 24 (6397 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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We used only whole rye flour and water to begin a starter in both the artisan baking courses I took and in the bakery where I worked. It took about 5-7 days to generate enough leavening power to make a sponge. From that, a period of some 8-12 hours was enough to start the actual final dough. There were some subtle tricks to this, none of which is germane to Mexico. ;-)
In fact, our usual source of rye flour, in Morelia, has been out of stock for months.

Buen provecho,
Anonimo


patricio_lintz


Nov 2, 2006, 3:49 PM

Post #14 of 24 (6346 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Yeast we forget!

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I finally got a starter going. I made whole wheat raisin bread. Delicious! I am not meaning to brag or anything, I am new at sourdough bread. I used the fermented raisins in the starter . It worked well.


Rolly


Nov 2, 2006, 4:04 PM

Post #15 of 24 (6343 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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I'll be right over.

Rolly Pirate


patricio_lintz


Nov 2, 2006, 4:11 PM

Post #16 of 24 (6340 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Yeast we forget!

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I made two loaves. If I could, I would send you one. I think that I will give it to my housekeeper, Laura.

www.makeyourhomeinmexico.com/blog


tonyburton


Nov 2, 2006, 4:18 PM

Post #17 of 24 (6336 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Now you just need five fishes...


Anonimo

Nov 2, 2006, 4:26 PM

Post #18 of 24 (6333 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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¡Felicidades! You are more industrious than I.
I have been baking a lot, but just with instant active yeast, Sierra Nevada brand lately.

Buen provecho,
Anonimo


sfmacaws


Nov 3, 2006, 1:41 AM

Post #19 of 24 (6312 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Yum, that sounds good. Did I get it right? You fermented the raisons first?


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




patricio_lintz


Nov 4, 2006, 6:31 PM

Post #20 of 24 (6284 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Yeast we forget!

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Yes. They were in the sponge. It had a nice sour taste.

I have a hard time not screwing with a recipe. I almost always substitute or add ingredients. It must be a character defect.


www.makeyourhomeinmexico.com


(This post was edited by patricio_lintz on Nov 4, 2006, 6:34 PM)


Ron Pickering W3FJW


Nov 4, 2006, 7:00 PM

Post #21 of 24 (6276 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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I have a hard time not screwing with a recipe. I almost always substitute or add ingredients. It must be a character defect.

Not a character defect patricio, I have the same problem. I just think it's because we are men, and men don't follow directions. Just ask any woman.
Getting older and still not down here.


drfugawe


Dec 10, 2006, 8:08 AM

Post #22 of 24 (6220 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Yeast we forget!

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Patricio,
Forgive my tardy entry into this thread, but yeast fascinates me and I wanted to share with you my experiences. I too have messed with starters of all sorts, in fact for years now. Slowly, I realized several things about good bread: the slower it rises, the better it tastes; the less (commercial) yeast is used, the better it tastes; the longer it ferments under refrigeration, the better it tastes. But I was frustrated by the many inconsistencies of using a true wild yeast starter, so I came upon a much simpler but trustworthy way to avoid commercial yeast and the hassle of wild yeast starters, but still have wonderful tasting, consistently good results every time.

The major ingredient is time, and the process is simply to make an initial starter with flour (whatever kind you want), water (enough to make a "pancake batter" consistency paste), and a tiny bit of commercial yeast (anything from a few grains to a pinch!). Put this in an open container and just leave it alone for several days, occasionaly striring it.

Eventually, it will begin to develop "hooch", which is a simple alcohol (and the real reason why the 49'ers used so much sourdough)- you can either stir that back in or pour it off - I discard it. In a few more days, the mixture will begin to become puffy as the yeast multiplies. If you wish, you can add a bit more flour and water.

Eventually it will develop more air than dough - it's ready now to be used as any sourdough starter would be to make bread, but you don't have to "build" it as so many sourdoughs require - just add some of your starter, and time will do the rest. But before you use it to make bread, save a small lump (1/4 cup is fine) and freeze it to do your next batch. The beauty here is that to make the next batch, you just thaw out the lump, add some more flour and water, and do as before. The freeze doesn't kill the yeast.

I prefer this over sourdough culture because it doesn't waste so much flour (with all the building and discarding of the culture as you go), it's more consistent, and it works fine, no matter how little starter you use initially - time is the only absolute. And recognize that it is almost a wild yeast culture - since it has grown completely open to whatever wild bacteria there is in your local air. But the tiny bit of yeast you add helps make it a sure bet - you're not subject to the whims of chance, which result in inconsistency.

One other thing - once I mix my final bread dough, I add salt at the very end (salt impeds the growth of yeast) and I give it a first rise at room temp. Then I give it an overnight in the fridge (important) to slow down the rise and allow for fermentation, which adds flavor. Next day you bring the dough to room temp, form into loaves, proof again (it will rise more slowly than with lots of yeast), and bake.

This sounds like a lot of hassle, but once you've got your starter made, it's really quite simple - just time consuming, which results in the best bread. And you never have to buy yeast again!
John
_________________________

"Self-respect: the secure feeling
that no one, as yet, is suspicious."
H.L. Mencken
____________###



Anonimo

Dec 10, 2006, 5:30 PM

Post #23 of 24 (6197 views)

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Re: [drfugawe] Yeast we forget!

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Lately I've been baking and experimenting with the Lahey-Bittman No Knead Bread, as outlined several weeks ago in the NY Times. It's pretty easy, and the results are excellent; if what you want is a pretty tasty, chewy, crisp-crusted, large celled bread. Keeping quality is amazing.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


drfugawe


Dec 11, 2006, 7:03 AM

Post #24 of 24 (6179 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Yeast we forget!

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Anonimo,
How does that "no knead" process differ from the norm? I don't much like kneading myself - and I've convinced myself that when I mix my final dough (in a standup KA), if I allow it to reach the "stringy" stage, where the glutin is obviously developing, and then let it continue for 10 mins or so, it won't need any further kneading. I use the paddle for this.

But I would like to know what Bittman does that's different.

Thanks Anonimo,
jm
_________________________

"Self-respect: the secure feeling
that no one, as yet, is suspicious."
H.L. Mencken
____________###

 
 
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