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Andy

Apr 29, 2002, 2:31 PM

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Driving IN Mexico City

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I will be moving to Mexico City temporarily in August and have a question about "Hoy No Circula".<p>My current US plates (which I will be keeping) have ONLY letters and no numbers.<p>According to the latest AAA guidebook of Mexico, there are currently NO provisions for cars with only letters on the license plate. <p>However, I have seen some information on the Internet that says that I would not be able to drive my car on Friday if I only have letters on my license plate. (http://www.mexconnect.com/business/mex2000driving.html)<p>Can anyone tell me how it *really* is in Mexico City?<p>Thanks
-Andy



RexC

Apr 30, 2002, 6:31 PM

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Driving IN Mexico City

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YOur AAA book is right, I have read the law, and it is silent regarding plates with all letters and no numbers. In that case, you would think you would be able to drive it on all days. I did recieve an Email from a man in Canada in response to one of my postings about the Hoy NO Circula Law though. He told me that he had a cop stop him for driving on a Friday with all letter plates. The cop showed him in his traffic book of regulations that cars with plates with all letters are not permitted to be driven on Fridays. The man that wrote me said he did pay the cop off. The guy later bought a copy of the law, and sure enough, it does not even mention plates with all letters, and no numbers. He believes, like I do, that you should be permitted to drive a car with that type of plate all week.<p>I too have read many postings, some of them by American Consulates, saying you can't drive a car with that type of plate on Fridays. It is a confusing situation. In spite of that, I am considering getting that type of license plates for the one car we have that is still registered in the U. S. The car is really my wife's car, a minivan, she won't even think about using our other car unless it is an emergency. <p>We live in Cuernavaca, 52 miles from Mexico City now, we used to live there. My wife is from Mexico City, and we make frequent trips there to visit family, etc. I think I can talk my way out of any problems in a situation arising out of having that type of plates. <p>I have been visiting, or living in Mexico for 28 years, and in all that time, I have never paid a bribe, or Mordida to any Mexican official, or office. That is a decision that each individual must make. The cops don't like to deal with people that will argue with them, they would rather go on to the next spineless sucker that will shove money in their face.<p>Not all Mexico City cops are corrupt, or jerks. The mayor, and the new Police Chief, are making serious efforts to clean them up. Bad cops are being fired every week now. A couple of months ago, My wife was staying at her Mom's house for a few days. Her mother had a doctors appointment, so my wife was driving her to the doctors office. On the wrong day. <p>At a stop light, a cop next to her rolled down his window and told her "Senora, you better take your car home, you are driving on the wrong day." My wife apologized, and told him she had forgotten what day it was, and was just taking her mother to the doctor. The cop replied, "OK, but after she is finished at the doctor, you better take your car home, somebody might give you a ticket." <p>If it is important to you to drive on Fridays for weekend trips, etc. and you don't want any possible hassels, you might want to consider getting a different license plate number.
The daily driving restriction starts at 6 AM, and ends at 10 PM. I have included a link below to some info on the law, non driving days, hourly smog reports, etc. It is a commercial site, but the info is good, and it is in English. You will notice that for Friday, besides the numbers 9 and 0, only cars with temporary paper permits are specifically restricted from being driven on that day.<p>I know this isn't much of a definitive answer to you question. The one thing that is predictable about Mexico, is that things are unpredictable here.<p>Rex<p> <p>
: I will be moving to Mexico City temporarily in August and have a question about "Hoy No Circula".<p>: My current US plates (which I will be keeping) have ONLY letters and no numbers.<p>: According to the latest AAA guidebook of Mexico, there are currently NO provisions for cars with only letters on the license plate. <p>: However, I have seen some information on the Internet that says that I would not be able to drive my car on Friday if I only have letters on my license plate. (http://www.mexconnect.com/business/mex2000driving.html)<p>: Can anyone tell me how it *really* is in Mexico City?<p>: Thanks
: -Andy<p>


flat_tire

May 1, 2002, 2:49 PM

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To Rex C

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What the world needs is a map or a list of municipios showing where the driving restrictions are enforced. Do you know where such a thing could be found?


RexC

May 2, 2002, 4:01 PM

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I have never seen or heard of such a map. There really is no need for one. Basically, everywhere in The Valle de Mexico is covered by this law. I think some people think this law just covers the Federal District of Mexico City. It covers the entire city. 27 munincipalities plus the Federal District comprise the Mexico City Metropolitan area. 42% of the population of Mexico City live in the Federal District. The rest of the population of the city live in The State of Mexico, which surrounds Mexico City on three sides. <p>You can be outside The Federal District and in The State of Mexico, and still be in Mexico City. If there are any pockets of territory in The Valle of Mexico not covered by this law, I am unaware of them. At any rate there is not enough territory not covered by the law to allow anyone to by-pass Mexico City. The law was enacted to reduce pollution in the whole Valle de Mexico.<p>The entire State of Puebla also has a Hoy No Circula law. You can find information on their law at: http://www.cccav.org/<p>The government of Mexico City also has a website with information on the law at: http.www.sma.df.gob.mx/menu.htm
This site also has information on which police agencies have jurisdiction for enforcing this law. Only the State of Mexico Transit Police (brown uniforms), and the Environmental Police have this authority. The environmental cops drive the prettiest two toned green police cars you ever saw, you can't miss them, although there aren't very many of them.<p>In case of a pollution alert, all police agencies in The Valle de Mexico are given jurisdiction for enforcing the law. Since it is not their usual duty, you will not likely get accurate information regarding the law by asking any cop not regularly assigned to enforce it. There hasn't been a polution alert in over two years now.<p>The best advice I can give to anyone driving to Mexico City is to find out which day you can't drive there, and don't drive that day. I have entered the link in English again below, where you can determine which day you are restricted from driving. <p>There are also signs at every toll booth as you enter Mexico City advising of which days particular cars can not be driven. Here in Cuernavaca, there is a large sign as you leave the city listing this info. We are 52 miles away from Mexico City, I don't know if there are signs of this type on any other routes leading to the city.<p>Well, I took the long road to answer your question, but short of having a newer, exempt, Mexican registered car, there is no way around this law.<p>Rex <p><p><p>
: What the world needs is a map or a list of municipios showing where the driving restrictions are enforced. Do you know where such a thing could be found?<p>


Ron

May 21, 2002, 10:41 AM

Post #5 of 5 (4036 views)

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Driving IN Mexico City

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Andy,<p>I had the same problem. When I came here my license plate ended in 0, meaning no Friday driving. Instead, I got an old plate from my father's car.<p>Let me give you some advice. Contact PlatesUSA.com. They have a lot of used license plates from all over the place, and request one from your state ending in a certain number. The cops here do not know and do not care. Why? When you enter Mexico at a given border crossing, they will only ask for your title, not registration. Moreover, they could not care less about Mexico City, only if you plan on illegally selling the your car here. You will notice they will list your state, but not your license plate number.
The used plates run under $20, and it beats paying about $500 a year in cab fares to go to work on Fridays.<p>Ron
 
 
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