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jennifer rose

Sep 13, 2002, 5:01 PM

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Dia de la Independencia -- Viva Mexico!

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As we enter this weekend’s puente – celebrating Dia de la Independencia – honoring our Independence from Spain, a time when various groups in Mexico – the rich, the poor, criollos, mestizos, large and small landowners – banded together almost two hundred years ago, let’s pause and give some thought to what this holiday means to all of us living in Mexico. (As well as those with Mexican ties living abroad.) It’s more than just the red, white and green, and it’s more than chiles en nogada. What does Dia de la Independencia mean to you?<p>



Uncle Jack

Sep 13, 2002, 7:14 PM

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&quot;honoring our Independence from Spain&quot;

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jennifer;<p>I don't think that most of us realized that you were a Mexican citizen.


Uncle Dan the Man

Sep 13, 2002, 7:32 PM

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más mexicana que el nopal (nmgs.)

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: jennifer;<p>: I don't think that most of us realized that you were a Mexican citizen.<p>


mrchuck

Sep 14, 2002, 7:04 AM

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Dia de la Independencia -- Viva Mexico!

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: This is indeed a somber holiday, but most over here only go to the "grito de dolores" which happens around dusk this evening in front of the admin bldg. After reading the Miguel Hidalgo Y Costilla announcements of 1810, our Mayor will call out the grito "mexicanos, Viva Mexico" 3 times, and the audience standing around and sitting in pick-up trucks/cars will then respond with the answer"VIVA MEXICO" and then pull out their forbidden firearms and all shoot them into the air AT THE SAME TIME!!! The smoke and smell of cordite is absolutely overwhelming. The silence is remarkable. The police from all Agencies have also shot off their own firearms and no one is saying a word. All then leave quietly for their homes. SO, what does this say you ask? I have mixed feelings. That there is always a underground of arms in waiting to defend their houses and way of life? Probably so. That the masses will overthrow the bonds of opressive govt's and outside rulers? Maybe. But I am always thrilled by the smell of illegal cordite smoke from the ammunition shot off. Yes, "asi es la vida" in a small pueblo that has a super high concentration of gringos who go about their daily lives as if they were still living in Long Beach. Hope this answer to your query is what you wre asking about. Saludos, mc


Jim in Cancun

Sep 14, 2002, 7:42 AM

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&quot;honoring OUR Independence from __________&quot; (fill in the blank)

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<center><img src="http://www.mexconnect.com/jim.gif"></center><p>


Uncle Jack

Sep 14, 2002, 7:59 AM

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On a serious note

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My first experience with Mexican Independence Day was over thirty years ago in Mexico City. The Mexicans make our Fourth of July celebrations look like Boy Scout meetings. Maybe it is just latin emotions or a different culture, but the Mexicans certainly know how to express their gratitude and exhuberence for their day of independence.


Georgia

Sep 14, 2002, 10:38 AM

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Oh, Jim, that was perfectly expressed! Thank you. nmsg

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nmsg<p>: I think the most important thing is to celebrate independence and freedom wherever and whenever it happens to appear and in all of its various, sundry and individualistic manifestations. To celebrate the independence of one country is not to separate it from other countries but rather to join it to the countries that have their own independence to celebrate! And to celebrate the independence of another is to join in that freedom.<p>: There are those who were born here in Mexico, those who feel so much a part of "here" that they identify and then those who have actually become citizens through the legal process. And then of course there are those who no matter how long they are "here" (wherever that may be)never feel a part of a country or church or city or group or family or.............They will never be a part of the "we/our" no matter what. (Been there--done that. Don't want to do it again.)<p>: And many, if not most of us, have had our own personal "slavery" that we have struggled to be free from or are still struggling to be free from--and those are the most important and difficult wars of independence to fight and to win. And then even that struggle never ends but is evolutionary and even when free we strive to be "freer." (But then that is the topic for "mañana".)<p>: But just for now let's celebrate the ocassion at hand. Whenever one person is free--anywhere--there is reason to celebrate--!<p>: ¡Viva México!<p>


Lavanda

Sep 14, 2002, 8:24 PM

Post #8 of 10 (7239 views)

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honoring Independence

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! Amen, hermanito !
y ! Viva Mexico !
! Viva la Patria ! <p>
I think the most important thing is to celebrate independence and freedom wherever and whenever it happens to appear and in all of its various, sundry and individualistic manifestations. To celebrate the independence of one country is not to separate it from other countries but rather to join it to the countries that have their own independence to celebrate! And to celebrate the independence of another is to join in that freedom.<p>: There are those who were born here in Mexico, those who feel so much a part of "here" that they identify and then those who have actually become citizens through the legal process. And then of course there are those who no matter how long they are "here" (wherever that may be)never feel a part of a country or church or city or group or family or.............They will never be a part of the "we/our" no matter what. (Been there--done that. Don't want to do it again.)<p>: And many, if not most of us, have had our own personal "slavery" that we have struggled to be free from or are still struggling to be free from--and those are the most important and difficult wars of independence to fight and to win. And then even that struggle never ends but is evolutionary and even when free we strive to be "freer." (But then that is the topic for "mañana".)<p>: But just for now let's celebrate the ocassion at hand. Whenever one person is free--anywhere--there is reason to celebrate--!<p>: ¡Viva México!<p>


Liz

Sep 16, 2002, 7:15 AM

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Hope

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  If we look at Mexico 100 years ago and Mexico today it is clear that things are improving. To me independance is all about hope and change. It is about a brighter future.<p> We enjoyed watching the fireworks over the Alhondiga from our window. Ever the person who hates crowds I stayed home.


ROCIO DIAZ ESSCARCEGA

Sep 23, 2002, 3:10 PM

Post #10 of 10 (7239 views)

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Dia de la Independencia -- Viva Mexico!

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: Esto es de hecho un día de fiesta del somber, pero lo más aquí posible va solamente al "grito de dolores" que sucede alrededor de oscuridad esta tarde delante del edificio del admin. ¡Después de leer los avisos de Migu
 
 
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