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Poncho32

Aug 4, 2006, 5:01 PM

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More Tourist go home

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 In a recent post I made about on tourist go home in Oaxaca, I got the feeling that a lot of you feel that what is written in the States News papers are not to be credited?
In regards to that a lot of news in the states and around the world for that matter gets blown out of proportion.
What is bothering me is there are more and more papers here in the states that are picking up on the happenings in Mexico related to the out come of the recent presidential election and expanding on it,now all that we are reading can not be false,see below for the latest from my neck of the woods. Bud
Friday - Hi/Low: 76/54
The News Tribune, Tacoma, WA - Friday, August 4th, 2006 6:33 AM

Tacoma, WA - August 4, 2006 Mexico’s unrest keeps tourist money away

MARK STEVENSON; The Associated Press
Published: August 4th, 2006 01:00 AM
ALEXANDRE MENEGHINI/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A tourist records downtown Oaxaca, Mexico, in front of a wall with graffiti that translates as “Tourist go home, Oaxaca is anti-capitalist.” Growing unrest has made some think twice about visiting.

MEXICO CITY – A human head washes up on an Acapulco beach. Protesters hassle visitors at makeshift checkpoints in the colonial city of Oaxaca. And in Mexico City, leftist demonstrators turn the tourist draws of Reforma Avenue and the Zocalo plaza into sprawling, ragtag protest camps.
Growing political unrest and drug violence are making foreigners think twice about visiting Mexico, where the $11.8 billion tourism industry is the country’s third-largest legal source of income, after oil and remittances from migrants in the United States.
Mexico has been struggling since last fall, when Hurricane Wilma hit the country’s biggest tourism moneymaker, Cancun.
No tourists have been reported hurt in Mexico City, Oaxaca or Acapulco, but hotels are being hit by cancellations of thousands of reservations. ...

For the full text of this article, please see:
http://www.thenewstribune.com/...01317p-5272930c.html

(Edited in the interests of netiquette by TB)


(This post was edited by tonyburton on Aug 4, 2006, 5:36 PM)



Papirex


Aug 4, 2006, 7:14 PM

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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Paseo de la Reforma # 305
United States Embassy Mexico
Colonia Cuauhtemoc
Mexico, D.F.

PLEASE CIRCULATE TO
AS MANY AMERICAN CITIZENS AS POSSIBLE
Warden Notice
August 4, 2006
Warden Notice Regarding Demonstrations in Mexico

Beginning July 30, a series of encampments were installed in the Plaza de la Constitucion “Zocalo”, along Paseo de la Reforma a main artery of Mexico City, and in other cities around Mexico. It is anticipated that the tents will remain at least until the Tribunal rules. The closure of Paseo de la Reforma has altered traffic patterns and increased congestion in downtown Mexico City impacting traffic to and from the Embassy. Similar demonstrations or temporary blockades reportedly have occurred in other parts of the country. Alterations in traffic patterns and congestion may continue for the next few weeks. U.S. citizens are encouraged to avoid any blockade and to allow extra time to get to and from a destination. U.S. citizens are also reminded to avoid participating in demonstrations and other activities that might be deemed political by Mexican authorities. The Mexican Constitution prohibits political activities by foreigners and such actions may result in detention and/or deportation.

We wish to remind U.S. citizens that even demonstrations intend to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence. U.S. citizens are urged to avoid the areas of demonstrations, and to exercise caution if within the vicinity of any protests. Since the timing and routes of marches and demonstrations are always subject to change, U.S. citizens should monitor local media sources for new developments.
For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's Internet web site at http://travel.state.gov where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, Travel Warnings and Public Announcements can be found. Up to date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States, or, for callers outside the United States and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). American citizens traveling or residing overseas are encouraged to register with the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate on the State Department's travel registration website at https://travelregistration.state.gov.
For any emergencies involving American citizens, please contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, Office of Citizens' Consular Services Reforma Ave 305, Col Cuauhtemoc Mexico, D. F., Mexico CP 06500 Tel: (011)(52)(55) 5080-2000 or e-mail: ccs@usembassy.net.mx . For additional information, please refer to the Embassy website: http://usembassy-mexico.gov.

*******************************************************************

The warden’s message above has some good advice for expat’s in the current situation. To have a vague understanding of how politics in Mexico functions, a person should allow 10 or 15 years. Twenty years is better. An understanding of the functionality and non-functionality of the Mexican court system, and why it is the way it is, is necessary too. Being down here with your feet in the mud is helpful too.

If you don’t live, or at least visit Mexico often, you will never understand what goes on down here and why. You will continue to compare the way things are done here with the way things are done in your own country. That is a mistake.

This last election was held in accordance with Mexican law. It was a close outcome, but there were no major irregularities. When the loser began his complaints and allegations of fraud, the federal electoral commission bent over backwards to satisfy his complaints. In an effort to satisfy him they allowed some 3 million ballots that had been disqualified because of irregularities, blank spaces, etc. to be counted. They were not required by any law to allow those ballots to be counted.

After those ballots were counted the outcome of the election was narrowed, but unchanged. The loser is still crying foul, and is now demanding a vote-by-vote recount. The electoral commission is standing fast at not counting some 2 million ballots that were disqualified for cause, fraudulent voters, etc.

There is no provision in Mexican federal electoral law for a national vote-by-vote recount. That is not unique; there is no provision for a vote-by-vote recount nationally in The United States either. A few times in our history men have been elected president when they did not win the majority of the votes cast nationwide. Understandably, there are often complaints about how our elections are conducted, but since they are conducted according to the present laws no one ever cries foul or alleges fraud.

There are very few truly spontaneous demonstrations in Mexico. A group almost always organizes them. The government formed almost all the unions in this country. The union leaders are not elected by the union members, but are appointed by politicians.

If a politician with authority over a union leader tells him to have his union demonstrate, the leader will call his people out. All of the union members that are interested in keeping their jobs will respond. Demonstrations, street and highway blockages are almost a monthly event in Mexico City.
With all the brouhaha surrounding the 2000 national elections in The UnitedStates, can you imagine how anyone could get a million people to voluntarily camp out in Washington D.C.?

When reading any news story about Mexico in the northern press, it is wise to consider that it is almost certainly inaccurate, incomplete, and exaggerated.

While we all have our own opinions and hopes for this country, we must keep them to ourselves. It is prohibited by law for any foreigner to discuss, or engage in politics in this country. We have virtually identical laws in the USA. Most counties do.

Whatever the outcome of the current political turmoil will be here, it is exclusively the business and responsibility of the Mexican government and people.

Rex

"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo

(This post was edited by RexC on Aug 4, 2006, 10:16 PM)


esperanza

Aug 4, 2006, 8:41 PM

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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Bud, I'm sorry, but the juxtaposition of articles in your post is exactly the kind of commentary from the USA that is used to foment and ferment a situation and blow what's real completely out of proportion.

The point I'm trying to make is that the story out of Acapulco, the story out of Oaxaca, and the story out of Mexico City are no more connected to one another than a gangland execution in Los Angeles, California, a bitter auto workers' strike in Detroit, and the Million Man March in Washington, D.C. To juxtapose the three articles about Mexico and suggest that it's too dangerous to visit us here is the same as juxtaposing the three hypothetical events in the USA and suggest that folks from Europe should stay put on their side of the Atlantic.

As Bubba so aptly pointed out in the prior thread that addressed this topic, Oaxaca (and other parts of Mexico) are full of political and anti-American graffiti. That one graffito that you and others have posted here may be the only one of its kind in Oaxaca, and there may be many others--I haven't visited Oaxaca during the teachers' strike and don't have an eye witness report.

As RexC pointed out, it takes a long, long time to understand politics in Mexico--even longer than it takes to understand political machinations in the USA. RexC's opinion, stated in his post, is that there were no irregularities in the July 2 presidential election. Others have a different point of view. For an excellent review of the options, have a look at this article that was published in the San Diego Union Tribune. It's clear, concise, accurate, and non-biased.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/...99-1n26mexelect.html

As mentioned in the article, the TRIFE has until September 6 to make a decision regarding the outcome of the July 2 election. Until then, we all need to wait and see.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Papirex


Aug 4, 2006, 10:10 PM

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Re: [esperanza] More Tourist go home

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Esperanza, the news story out of San Diego that you provided the link to illustrates in a small way the unreliability of news stories from NOB.

The first paragraph is at worst a fabrication and at best an example of deceptive poetic license. It mentions a “solemn courtroom.” This will give a reader the impression that there will be a court proceeding as most of us are familiar with, based on English law.

There are no courtrooms in Mexico. You will not see the judge(s) in a Mexican courthouse. The judge makes the decision based on written questions and written answers. There will be no witnesses or attorneys present to question witnesses or to challenge evidence. They make their decisions in their office behind closed doors. Justice is administered in secret here.

There was one courtroom as we know them constructed a couple of years ago when President Fox was trying to overhaul the legal system here. He wanted to change the legal system from “written” trials to “oral” trials.

A “written” trial is what exists today with the trials conducted using written questions and answers. An “oral” trial was to be a trial in a courtroom with the witnesses and attorneys present, more or less on the model of English law.

The judge, prosecutor, and defense attorney all had to undergo several months of training to learn how to conduct an “oral” trial. At least one, and maybe it was two trials were held using this system.

The party that has controlled the congress vehemently opposed the change to the court system. No more trials have been held using this method.

In many ways, when we come to Mexico we have stepped through the looking glass.

Rex






"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo

(This post was edited by RexC on Aug 4, 2006, 10:21 PM)


esperanza

Aug 5, 2006, 6:30 AM

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Re: [RexC] More Tourist go home

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RexC, if that's the biggest objection you have to the San Diego Union Tribune article, you are straining at a gnat.

The room where the tribunal meets is hardly the issue.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Poncho32

Aug 5, 2006, 8:31 AM

Post #6 of 29 (3867 views)

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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The only reason to post the previous article was to air a concern about what is being said of happenings in Mexico.We all know that the news media has a way of blowing things out of proportion at times, but yet articles such as this would never occur if there was no sound basis for it.
I believe that it is good to air situations such as this.
People should always be made aware of happenings, so they in turn can search out weather they wish to venture in this arena. A word of caution is never bad.Bud


Papirex


Aug 5, 2006, 8:50 AM

Post #7 of 29 (3860 views)

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Re: [esperanza] More Tourist go home

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The point addressed in my last post was not the room, but the procedures used to make decisions in Mexico.
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo


esperanza

Aug 5, 2006, 8:55 AM

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In Reply To
The first paragraph is at worst a fabrication and at best an example of deceptive poetic license. It mentions a “solemn courtroom.”
The balance of your post discusses court procedures in Mexico. The Tribunal is neither a criminal nor a civil court. The procedures you discuss do not apply to this tribunal.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on Aug 5, 2006, 8:58 AM)


jerezano

Aug 5, 2006, 9:02 AM

Post #9 of 29 (3850 views)

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Re: [RexC] More Tourist go home

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Hello,

We need to make a point here: Quote. It is prohibited by law for any foreigner to discuss, or engage in politics in this country. End quote.


In no way is a foreigner forbidded to discuss Mexican politics. We are doing that in this very forum. We are however forbidden to try to influence how politcs proceeds here in this country.

Adiós. jerezano.


Poncho32

Aug 5, 2006, 7:11 PM

Post #10 of 29 (3764 views)

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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Pardon me, but I have been led to believe that this and other forums on this web site that I have been a member for quite some time is to help one another.
The only reason that I have brought these articles to the public attention is for awareness,to attempt to hide the facts that are happening in Mexico or any place in our world is not my way. A word of caution is not damaging.
Bud
.


jerezano

Aug 6, 2006, 8:59 AM

Post #11 of 29 (3698 views)

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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Hello Bud,

Your point is well taken. Some of us who live in Mexico and enjoy the peaceful life where we are living are not aware that some areas of Mexico have been designated by the US State Department as dangerous areas for tourists.

Warnings on traveling to Mexico City and to Oaxaca have been issued. Tourists should be well aware of those warnings. As a tourist I wouldn't reccommend that any other tourist visit those two areas at this time. Inconvenience if nothing else.

Still, if I had a necessity to visit either area and it could not be postponed, then.....but be aware!

And Bud, just because some of us here on the board are a bit short in expressing disagreement or some are taking the attitude that you might be Chicken Little crying "the sky is falling" don't take it to heart. Your reading that we on this and other www.mexconnect foro are trying to help one another out by sharing our own experiences and thoughts is absolutely correct. ¡Adelante!

Adiós. jerezano.


arbon

Aug 6, 2006, 9:39 AM

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Re: [jerezano] More Tourist go home

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Zacatecas, was also on the list of cities having large crowd gatherings, from the Canadian Consul post warning tourists.

Zacatecas, is not in the "Current Issues" list.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



(This post was edited by arbon on Aug 6, 2006, 9:51 AM)


morgaine7


Aug 6, 2006, 10:02 AM

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Re: [jerezano] More Tourist go home

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Amen to Jerezano's comments. Things look a lot scarier from anywhere else than they do when you're actually in the media-targeted location. Living in the Mideast since 1982, I've been on the receiving end of US embassy alerts for decades. The warnings are conservative in the sense of being targeted to a general US visitor audience who may or may not have a clue about the area. Rightfully so, although it makes us long-timers LOL most of the time.

Kate


Poncho32

Aug 6, 2006, 4:06 PM

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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As some one who has lived 5-6 months at a time for thirty six years in Mexico, with out further you have to know that I love it.
With all the struggle we have in our world today words of caution should be sent out when needed.
I am quite fortunate that I have been able to travel in a big part of our world ,in all of the countries and states that I have traveled through at times there have been hot spots to avoid.Mexico is quite unique that when discontent creates hot spots that should be avoided till they cool down, you don't hear about it (in country), I would assume brought about by the Department of Tour-ism keeping the media quiet, the fact does remain that 65% or better of the Mexican economy is supported by tour-ism.Nothing will keep me and my family from traveling again latter in the year to our home in Mexico but you can bet your sweet life I will avoid the Known hot spots at the time, no differently that if I was to be traveling through Los Angeles or Chicago, or for that matter Washington D.C.
Bud


jerezano

Aug 6, 2006, 5:22 PM

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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Hello,

Bud, for some reason you seem to hit my buttons. I am with you but then you say something with which I have to disagree. You said:

Mexico is quite unique that when discontent creates hot spots that should be avoided till they cool down, you don't hear about it (in country),....

The problem is that Mexico does not have many publications in English. Those few available are mostly dedicated to tourism and the tourist view and cannot be bothered with local events which might discourage that tourism.

But to say that hot spots are not made known "in country" is to beg the issue. I can read in Mexico's newspapers much more about the current troubles in Oaxaca or those that happened in Atenco or the continuing massacres in Cd. Juárez that I can really accept.

You can't possibly think that the USA State Department Advisoraries are issued based on clandestine reports of the CIA only. They are based on specialist analyses of events reported from all sources including the local and federal newspapers, police reports, economic reports and God only knows what else. For example the well-known advisory not to use cabs hailed on the street in Mexico City is based on reports of robberies, assaults, kidnappings and assasinations as carred in on-going articles in the newspapers as well as police reports, etc., and is nothing more than a repeat of what the citizens of Mexico City will advise you.

The fact that we may not know what is going on is based on our own limited abilities to enter into the mainstream of the country. Not the fact that the country or its Tourism Department is deliberately suppressing information. I don't think Mexico is unique in that way at all. We are not in Cuba or Venezuela ... or?

Adiós. jerezano.


Sherrill

Aug 6, 2006, 5:59 PM

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Re: [Bud Crest] More Tourist go home

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Have lived in Mexico for 7 years full time. Most of the people I know are apolitical. There is that fatalistic attitude that whatever happens, happens and they are not going to spend a lot of time speculating. Yes, there are safety concerns for different areas just as there are for USA. I remember going to Chiappas when Subcommander Marcos was getting lots of publicity and there were travel warnings. In reality it was not a big deal. Public bus we were on had to wait for maybe half hour going to Palenque and then we passed thru. So just as one would not go to South Central LA at midnight, one would avoid large political gatherings until Sept 6 when the winner of presidential election will be formally declared. Mexico is a safe and welcoming place to live. Oh, I think it is safe now to go to Arizona. The two serial killers have been arrested.

I just checked the travel warnings from US gov and Mexico is not listed.


(This post was edited by Sherrill on Aug 6, 2006, 6:20 PM)


esperanza

Aug 6, 2006, 6:09 PM

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First of all, Bud, please accept my apologies for what must have seemed to you to be an insensitive response to your posts about the troubles in Mexico. I assure you that I and all of us MexConnect members value your contributions and insights and that we would all be the poorer without them.

I think that those of us who are old Mexican hands (as many know, I've been here either full-time or part-time for 25 years) realize that there is an ebb and flow to life here. It's quite different from, and yet in some ways similiar to, the ebb and flow of life in the USA or Canada. By that I mean that some of us live in a fairly protective setting, outside the 'hotspots'. Some of us choose to live a life circumscribed by other expatriates and by expatriate comings and goings, confining ourselves to volunteer work in the Mexican community and interactions with Mexicans that are limited by language lacks. Others of us choose to immerse ourselves in the jostle and buzz of Mexican life, rarely interacting with expatriates, acquiring local news and gossip from our Mexican neighbors and friends, and receiving national and international news from Mexican sources.

Jerezano makes some very good points in his post. Those of us who live in Mexico and travel frequently to the 'hotspot' places have a very different outlook on what's happening here than innocent folks who might be planning a once-in-a-lifetime vacation to Cancún or Puerto Vallarta. Vacationers to Mexico often don't know how to differentiate between the tourism of the Vallarta beaches and the barrios and colonias of Mexico City. Where is it safe? Where can I eat, and where should I not? How to explain the difference between a sitio taxi and a taxi hailed on the street? How to describe the distance between the tianguis (street market) in Ajijic and El Tepito (another street market) in the DF? Learning Mexico takes years.

It's not so different from learning the USA. What first-time European tourist heads unwittingly for the Detroit ghetto? Which innocent visitor from South America knows the ins and outs of East Los? Would you drive for the first time in the USA in Boston or New York? And who knows where the hotspots are in the USA today? I surely don't, but I'd wager that there are some. Which foreign government puts out travel advisories for those places in the USA?

So, we all have a lot to learn. You're right: we need to remember to learn from one another. We all have a lot to offer.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Sherrill

Aug 6, 2006, 6:44 PM

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very nice post, Esperanza. I was getting ready to edit what I wrote and tell Bud that he is right on to give current info re Mex and should not be faulted for it. Giving info is very much like a game of telephone. Issues get so mixed and intent misunderstood. And I think here that all Bud intended was to share info. But I have to pull a Bubba here and hope that gringos will be scared off and leave us alone! The fewer; the better.


Bubba

Aug 6, 2006, 9:46 PM

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Re: [Sherrill] More Tourist go home

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I must admit that I have, until the last 10 years or so, almost always lived and/or worked in places with an edge. That last 10 years was spent among the vineyards of Napa/Sonoma and in the Chapala area, the closest thing to Peoria that Mexico has to offer. First there was Alabama during the civil rights era and I had the good fortune to be witness to and, at times, a part of, related events in Selma and Birmingham, to San Francisco during the Summer of Love era and on to Downtown Oakland and Berkeley during equally tumultuous times. I am only touching on the surface here but personally I had great fun and would not have traded all that for the comfort and security of a banking career in Dubuque taking monthly collateral inventory down at the pig farm.

One thing all those places had in common is that from the outside they were all considered somewhat edgy if not downright dangerous which, I suppose they were if you ventured where you did not belong or interracted with those who might wish to do you harm. Living and working in those places was a different matter and not only interesting but reasonably secure.

I am reminded of the movie MISSING of which I saw a re-run last night. When I first saw it years ago, I was really touched by this movie about the coup in Chile in the 1970s that brought Pinochet to power. Last night it seemed hopelessly naive as young, idealistic Americans got caught up in Chilean/Nixonian politics they could not possibly understand and were jailed, deported or even killed for the effort. There was Jack Lemon , being treated with extraordinary. if deceptive, deference simply because he was an American citizen. My how times have changed.

My point, I suppose, is that Birmingham, San Francisco, Oakland, Mexico City or any other place could and can pose dangers for the uninitiated and, for that reason, strangers venturing in those places need to be apprised of the need to exercise caution in their choice of activities until they are more knowledgable about the respective communities. Therefore, these precautionary notices by the State Department and/or alarmist news articles in the press serve a positive function up to a point.

I, like Jerezano, Esperanza and others who post here, read the local press and watch local television news programs. My personal impression from those media is that there is a great deal of violence and corruption in Mexico just as there is in varying degrees in New York, Rio de Janeiro and Lagos among countless other places including my rural southern home town As for expressing indignation about mistreatment when on foreign soil, as the U.S. consul in Santiago said to Jack Lemon in MISSING, "...yáll come down here messing around with folks you don´t know and don´t understand and you wonder why you get hurt. What happens to the Chilean who goes to New York and messes around with the mafia?" Wisdom is the better part of valor.

Sherrill stated:

But I have to pull a Bubba here and hope that gringos will be scared off and leave us alone! The fewer; the better.

Well put Sherrill You have me pegged. We just bought a home in a town that apparently scares the bejesus out of many expats and, so far, I have been told we are out of our minds at least three times. We must be doing something right. We can see what is happening in the Chapala area in which so many expats seem comfortable. So long Sun City.


morgaine7


Aug 7, 2006, 7:13 AM

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Re: [Bubba] More Tourist go home

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Wise words, Bubba. Tolerance for "edginess" or even inconvenience varies widely among individuals. When I was house-hunting in Baja Sur, a RE agent told me of a couple who came all the way from South Africa intending to buy property. But their luggage got lost, and this unnerved them so badly that they cancelled their appointments and flew back home.

On a lighter note, have y'all see this? [Flash alert, may take a bit of time to load for dial-uppers.]
http://americancomedynetwork.com/FLASH/MexTourism.htm

Kate


Poncho32

Aug 7, 2006, 8:23 AM

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After reading all the latest posts I now feel that you all have an understanding of my reasoning, thanks Bud.


Bubba

Aug 7, 2006, 8:42 AM

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Kate:

I like that story about the South African couple who freaked and flew back to Africa. I have a feeling the luggage was just an excuse. I always wanted to explore the possibilty of retiring in the wine country around Capetown but my wife put the quiteus on that fast.

The story around Ajijic, which is probably apocryphal, concerns the expat retirees flying into Guadalajara and taking a taxi to the Chapala area only to spot a dead, bloated horse carcass covered with lime lying along the roadside soon after leaving the airport. The story goes that they immediately ordered the taxi driver to execute a u-turn and take them back to the airport for an immediate return flight home. If I really thought this worked that well, I would personally commission numerous plastic bloated horse carcasses with which to decorate that highway.

One problem with those who are uneasy about settling in a foreign culture is that they aften have a tendency to want to meld that foreign society with the one from whence they came. As more and more of these types of people move to places such as Lake Chapala´s north shore for economic reasons or the weather rather than for the adventure of learning to live in a foreign culture, we can anticipate increased pressure from them to turn this area into a mirror image of U.S. suburbia. These are the folks who find it intolerable that local people have not mastered English in deference to the mighty gringo dollar. This is an unpleasant trend to contemplate.


(This post was edited by Bubba on Aug 7, 2006, 9:47 AM)


caldwelld


Aug 7, 2006, 9:15 AM

Post #23 of 29 (3444 views)

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With respect, I found the flash video niether funny nor entertaining. Too close to the bone I guess. Perhaps I hang with a more enlightened crowd, but I see a sensitivity to the culture that is, for the most part, deferential and positive towards our hosts. There are some who clearly don't get it but certainly most do. There is of course the tendancy to be pro change in line with where the foreigners have come from because they (rightly or wrongly) interpret that as progress. Many Mexicans agree. Language will always be a problem simply because it is so difficult to get quickly up to speed - those that are good and try hard can make it in maybe five years, those that are slow and have less opportunity or motivation will never make it past a few pleasantries with only a handful of nationals.
dondon


esperanza

Aug 7, 2006, 10:46 AM

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I don't find it funny to perpetuate these sorts of stereotypes, even though the ideas are spoken by cartoon folks from the USA. This video would be better left off the MexConnect forums.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









carlw

Aug 7, 2006, 12:14 PM

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Re: [RexC] More Tourist go home

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I am one of the lurkers who does not often contribute to the forum, though I really enjoy reading everyone else's postings.

Late last night, I returned to Dallas from a 10 day trip to Mexico, half spent in Mexico city. I spent most of my time in or near the historic center, traveled primarily on the metro or by foot, at all hours of day and night, frequently alone, sometimes with other American friends or Mexican friends, and never experienced any feelings of hostility or ill-will. The Metro was incredibly crowded at almost all hours, especially near the Zocalo, and there were often small, spontaneous demonstrations of support for Amador at street corners and Metro stations. Most people who mentioned the events at all did so as a way of explaining why the Metro and other public transportation are so crowded. Many main streets are blocked off near the Zocalo and the only way to get close to the area is on foot or Metro. All persons with whom I had any contact seemed the same friendly and curious people as always. My friends who live in Mexico CIty seem oblivious to the goings-on, except for the inconvenience. At the same time, there are lots of periodicals, flyers, etc, which state that the elections were a fraud and action should be taken. We can only watch and see what happens as September nears.

I will mention a pleasant part of the trip; good accomodations are still available at good prices. Pino Suares Metro station includes the Hotel San Lucas, where I stayed in a very large, very new-looking and clean room, 2 King beds, cable, large, very nice bathroom, for less than 300 pesos per night. On the way to D.F., I stopped at a hotel in San Luis Potosi, next to the bus station, called Motel Potosi. It was renovated like new, with small 2 room suites, individual carport, large, clean bathrooms, 200 pesos for one person. I was amazed at both places
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