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Oscar2

May 19, 2006, 8:57 AM

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local colloquialism

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There is a local colloquialism or perhaps it's called an idiom in which when spoken in Spanish it carries a romantic symbolic air to it, which isn't easy to capture as well in English.

For example when a man looks at a woman with a twinkle and a smile in his eye followed by a humorous, friendly kind of phrase such as: Quero cantarte de las flores! It carries something in the air which in someway causes a woman's eyes to sort of open up and sometimes from it comes a pleasant smile. It is apparently something Latin woman recognize as something warm and giving.

Now if I were to say this in English which means: I'd like to sing to you of the flowers! The delivery just doesn't carry the same package.

Are there other Mexican examples of such deliveries? Laugh

(This post was edited by DavidMcL on May 19, 2006, 9:01 AM)



jerezano

May 19, 2006, 9:02 AM

Post #2 of 20 (11047 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] The Learning Spanish Forum - opportunity to comment . . .

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Hello Oscar2,

Of course there are many other famous Spanish piropos (graceful phrases) which are lanzadas (tossed) to the pretty women.

I hope that the Quero in your quote was just a typo for Quiero--I want

Adios. jerezano.


(This post was edited by jerezano on May 19, 2006, 9:06 AM)


mariejosee


May 19, 2006, 10:04 AM

Post #3 of 20 (11039 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] local colloquialism

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Corazón de melon... (melon heart)!!



************************************************************
As if you could kill time without injuring eternity.
"Henry David Thoreau"



Oscar2

May 19, 2006, 5:44 PM

Post #4 of 20 (11024 views)

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Re: [jerezano] The Learning Spanish Forum - opportunity to comment . . .

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Of course there are many other famous Spanish piropos (graceful phrases) which are lanzadas (tossed) to the pretty women.

I hope that the Quero in your quote was just a typo for Quiero--I want



Hi Jerezano,

My spelling and writing of the Spanish language suffers is comparison to my ability to speak and understand it “most of the time.” I get a little uneasy when they start speaking rapidly and use words more sophisticated than what I am accustomed to at this point.

I did use my electronic hand held and PC computer on the word “Quero” but I guess unsuccessfully but I’m glad you caught the context of the phrase. I will also remember the term “Spanish piropos” meaning graceful phrases. I love the way Latin “graceful” phrases connect when used descriptively and recognized. Sometimes they play well to the heart.


Oscar2

May 19, 2006, 6:02 PM

Post #5 of 20 (11019 views)

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Re: [mariejosee] local colloquialism

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Mi Corazon and Mi Vida are very popular as well and especially have an engaging romantic ring to them!


Meaning: “My Heart” and “My Life.

I hear Mi Corazon and/or Mi Vida a lot even when someone is in battle with the other and to appease each other to remain sane, Mi Corazon appears in attempts to appease the other toward peace and greater affection. So true!


esperanza

May 19, 2006, 9:02 PM

Post #6 of 20 (11006 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] local colloquialism

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Piropos--those flirty sentiments of love and desire--are infinite.

Here are a few more:

Si la belleza matará, tú no tendrías perdón de Dios If beauty could kill, God would never pardon you.

No te digo mi vida, te digo mi amor, por que mi vida se termina, y mi amor por tú jamás. I don't call you my life, I call you my love, because my life will end and my love for you will not.

¿Sabes que es lo más bonito de mis ojos? El reflejo de los tuyos. Do you know what's the most beautiful thing about my eyes? The reflection of yours.

¿De qué juguetería te escapaste?, ¡muñeco! What toy store did you escape from, doll!

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Oscar2

May 20, 2006, 10:09 AM

Post #7 of 20 (10992 views)

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Re: [esperanza] local colloquialism

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OOH Boy…….Esperanza, I didn’t know you had it in you….esos piropos on an emotional scale are major CHARMERS!!

I especially enjoyed the one: ¿Sabes que es lo más bonito de mis ojos? El reflejo de los tuyos. Do you know what's the most beautiful thing about my eyes? The reflection of yours.

And then followed by: No te digo mi vida, te digo mi amor, por que mi vida se termina, y mi amor por tú jamás. I don't call you my life, I call you my love, because my life will end and my love for you will not.

These and more reflect the kind of sweetness the emotional pallet tastes just at that precise moment when life brings with it a need for it's message.

Another one I’ve heard and enjoy its impact is when you look into someone’s eyes and at that moment needed you say: Mi vida, es tuya! (My life, is yours!)

The desire to read, write and speak Spanish is more intense when one is able to arrange the language such that it delivers the wonderful romantic secrets in which piropos said well can slay a dragon!

I’m particularly sensitive about my need to learn how you guys manage to apply the correct characters to the pronunciations of certain written words. Do you take each letter individually, highlight it and use the copy and paste character charts available for each letter necessary? Or better yet, is there an easier way which just recognizes the word and applies characters accordingly? I heard there is either a Latin keyboard or is it a downloadable software program which does it automatically?

With those questions asked, I just want you more fluent readers to know your life experience shared here is not only valuable to this fledgling but very important and much appreciated.


Rolly


May 20, 2006, 10:29 AM

Post #8 of 20 (10989 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] local colloquialism

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Oscar, look here: http://www.mexconnected.com/...cgi?post=89858#89858

Rolly Pirate


doogie

May 20, 2006, 12:13 PM

Post #9 of 20 (10982 views)

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Re: [esperanza] local colloquialism

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¿Y de cuál jardín de flores te escapaste tú, Esperanza? ¡Que piropos tán tremendos te aventaste!
Quiero oir más, que creo que me estoy enamorando.
Doogie,
Tapatío de corazón


esperanza

May 20, 2006, 1:06 PM

Post #10 of 20 (10977 views)

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Re: [doogie] local colloquialism

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A few more:

Quisiera ser gato para vivir nueve vidas a tu lado. I would like to be a cat to live nine lives at your side.

Quisiera ser pirata para navegar en el mar de tus ojos y encontrar el tesoro de tu amor. I would like to be a pirate, to sail the sea of your eyes and find the treasure of your love.

Niña, dame un jarabe para el mal de amor, pues trocito a trocito se me rompe el corazón. Girl, give me a medicine for lovesickness, since little bit by little bit my heart is breaking.

Quisiera estar en tu pecho y saber por quien suspiras, dueña de mi alma, cuando me miras. I would like to be in your chest and know who you sigh for, owner of my soul, when you are looking at me.

Quisiera ser mariposa para volar hacia ti, y decirte, vida hermosa, que estoy muriendo por ti. I would like to be a butterfly to fly near you and tell you, lovely life, that I am dying for you.


*sigh*

No te enamores ni tantito, doogie, hay otra que es dueña de mi corazón.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









doogie

May 20, 2006, 1:25 PM

Post #11 of 20 (10974 views)

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Re: [esperanza] local colloquialism

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¡AY me duele el corazón! Pues claro, no tengo ninguna ilusión de que esas lindas frases se referían a mi. Sin embargo, me fascinan y nada mas te diré "Mientras hay vida, hay Esperanza".
Doogie,
Tapatío de corazón


sfmacaws


May 20, 2006, 2:25 PM

Post #12 of 20 (10969 views)

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Re: [doogie] local colloquialism

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Quote
Mientras hay vida, hay Esperanza


¡Qué juego en palabra! (¿Tenga sentido esta frase? ¿O hay otro frase con significado de A play on words in inglés?)


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




esperanza

May 20, 2006, 5:11 PM

Post #13 of 20 (10957 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] local colloquialism

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La frase quiere decir "While there's life there's hope", pero sí, es un juego de palabras..."While there's life, there's Esperanza".

Qué bonito sentido de humor tienes, doogie. Me encanta.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Oscar2

May 21, 2006, 10:11 AM

Post #14 of 20 (10929 views)

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Re: [esperanza] local colloquialism

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Oh Boy, Oh Boy! I’d have to be totally nuts if I were to say I didn’t love this. It’s very touching and carries with it reminders that sweet emotions are still so close and yet so far for others. I choked…..

Ezperanza and Doogie, at least for me, you guys are causing a ground swell and my heart moves with it.
Ezperanza, Cuando tu cantas, los pajaros bajon del cielo y beson el piso de tu vida! Means: Ezperanza, such words charm the birds from the heavens to kiss the earth your life stands on!

Doogie, you’re a sly ol’raskle with a penchant for expression filled with charm and grace. Such phrases create envy in lesser and hunger in the aspiring.

While still wrestling with “piropos” expression’s I’d like you all to know it’s been personally good for me because I find myself using my dictionary more than I ever have in trying to find expression which “graceful Mexican phrases” require if you want to light the fire of emotions a good delivery brings.

I ditto sfmacaws post’s in another popular thread “Dicho’s” in which although I sense she’s much more advanced than I, it’s encouraging knowing I’m not the only one who now feels fueled by ones need by subject matter which touches the spirit to do something more. It feels like a win-win situation.

Ezperanza, the grace and talent of the expression you bring us is one thoroughly enjoyed and my aspiring envy is a good thing because it tells of what I must do. Incidentally, where did you find the beauty of such phrases?

With all the marvelous things written in the past by some of the more talented public writers, are there publications available in which one can read containing “Graceful Mexican Phrases or the like?”


doogie

May 21, 2006, 4:49 PM

Post #15 of 20 (10907 views)

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Re: [esperanza] local colloquialism

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Pues grácias, esperanza, me agrada que así te paresca. Por mi parte, te felicito por la manera tán linda que tienes de expresarte. Además, claro, estoy agradecido de ésta oportunidad de comunicar en Español, pues ya tengo muchos años de vivir en E.U. Qué bonita es esta idioma, ¿verdad?
Doogie,
Tapatío de corazón


Oscar2

May 22, 2006, 2:30 PM

Post #16 of 20 (10875 views)

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Re: [Rolly] local colloquialism

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Rolly, et al


Thanks for the heads up on the Letter Character Chart Placement and download. It works well. The caveat is one must decide where these letter Characters should be placed for proper accent and pronunciation.

This is why I asked if there is either a keyboard, or Spanish writing software that automatically characterizes the letters needed for correct pronunciation. I’ve Googled and searched MC unsuccessfully.

Is there a text book or a software program which teaches Spanish reading and writing experienced by someone who fond it effective, relatively easy and comprehensive?

I must “really” admit that since my interests has curved toward Spanish reading and writing, improved speech and identification of the words I’ve used for years now fall into place much easier and with greater comprehension.

Estoy mucho mas contento sabiendo que ahí personas como ustedes que ayudás y oigan este menso mejorar algo que debe de a echo muchos años pasados. Laugh Gracias por tu paciencia y por tu existencia!

Please note what’s said has “some” accent characters copied from the dictionary. A program or suggested publication used by someone teaching when and where to use these characters would really be nice......

I almost forgot is there a program or text book which contains Spanish Synonyms and Antonyms?

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on May 22, 2006, 2:42 PM)


Rolly


May 22, 2006, 2:59 PM

Post #17 of 20 (10871 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] local colloquialism

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"The caveat is one must decide where these letter Characters should be placed for proper accent and pronunciation.

This is why I asked if there is either a keyboard, or Spanish writing software that automatically characterizes the letters needed for correct pronunciation."

¿Are you asking for a spell checker that corrects accent marks? If so, MS Word will do that if you load and select the Spanish spell checker.

Rolly Pirate


Oscar2

May 22, 2006, 4:09 PM

Post #18 of 20 (10864 views)

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Re: [Rolly] local colloquialism

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Rolly,

I have Windows XP Pro and I went to Tools then Languages and then selected Spanish (Mexico) and now it not only checks English but Spanish as well. Rolly, you did it again!
I'm up and running, thank you so much!

If anyone knows of Software for Spanish Reading and Writing programs or a good publication, this too would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance.


Georgia


May 28, 2006, 7:13 AM

Post #19 of 20 (10803 views)

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Re: [esperanza] My all time favorite piropo

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A little background: I was my grandmother's favorite and in spite of that she referred to my legs as "piano legs." My legs are not graceful (by American standards) in the ankle ... but typical of many women's ankles in Spain: there is no little bone protruding on the inner side of my ankle. Stop yawning. This is serious.

One day in Madrid, when I was about 20 and still self conscious about my deficient ankles an older gentleman passing in the opposite direction, paused, perused my ankles, put one hand over his heart and proclaimed:

Ay, senorita. Tiene las piernas tan bonitas que me hacen encender los cerillos en el bosillo.

(Ah, young lady. Your legs are so pretty they make the matches light in my pocket.)

Normally a proper young lady does not respond in any way to a piropo. We just soak 'em up and enjoy. This one stopped me in my tracks. I howled with laughter. Nice gentleman was scandalized and scurried away. But my ungainly ankles were an object of beauty in Spain. My people!

This was only equalled by my last wolf whistle in Rome when I was 42 .... and I still love all Italians including my husband.


Oscar2

May 29, 2006, 9:19 AM

Post #20 of 20 (10776 views)

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Re: [Georgia] My all time favorite piropo

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Hola Georgia, et al.

¡Cuando llego tu piropo a mi puerta, abriéndola el chiste de los encendidos quemando bolsas es hilarante! Muchas gracias por tu entrada en la lengua que estoy aprehendiendo a escribir y leyere.

Who knows, perhaps by next semester I’ll be pretty close to carrying on larger and more comprehensive written Spanish discussions with just about anyone. I’m glad you write and speak well due to your previous experience where I can periodically expand new skills talking to you en otra lengua.

If my Spanish entries here, or on any other forum need correction, henceforth, please (anyone who can help) feel welcomed to openly correcting it. I feel the end result will definitely help me and/or any other person reading it as well.

¡Gracias y Asta luego! Laugh
 
 
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