Mexico Connect
Forums  > Specific Focus > Learning Spanish


Oscar2

May 14, 2006, 12:43 AM

Post #1 of 9 (9317 views)

Shortcut

Correct terminology

Can't Post | Private Reply
Encouraging the use of this forum is much appreciated and will use it as much as needed in the future. I’ve hunted for the English meaning to the word and in futility can’t find how to even spell it correctly.

The meaning of the word or combination of words describes either someone’s reciprocal display of gratitude/appreciation either through their actions, attitude or some sort of demeanor which genuinely reflects sincere appreciation for your good will toward them.

I think the word is spelled either: granjar, agranhar or granjear.
In a sentence it can be said: No sabe agranjar.

Please assist if you can and explain best you can.

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on May 14, 2006, 12:45 AM)



doogie

May 14, 2006, 11:37 AM

Post #2 of 9 (9296 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Oscar2] Correct terminology

Can't Post | Private Reply
Granja is a small ranch or farming estate. I've never heard it used as a verb.
Perhaps you're thinking of agradecer which means to appreciate or be grateful for, as in No sabe agradecer, or Agradezco tu ayuda. Does this help?
Doogie,
Tapatío de corazón


esperanza

May 14, 2006, 1:34 PM

Post #3 of 9 (9287 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Oscar2] Correct terminology

Can't Post | Private Reply
Granjear means to win someone over.

No la sabe granjear...He doesn't know how to win her over.

A synonym would be conquistar.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









quevedo

May 14, 2006, 2:41 PM

Post #4 of 9 (9281 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Oscar2] Correct terminology

Can't Post |
Agranhar and granjar are not Spanish words (as of Real Academia Española Dictionary, D.R.A.E.)

granjear.
(De granja).
1. tr. Adquirir caudal, obtener ganancias traficando con ganados u otros objetos de comercio.
2. tr. Adquirir, conseguir, obtener.
3. tr. Captar, atraer, conseguir voluntades, etc. U. m. c. prnl.
4. tr. Mar. Ganar, con relación a la distancia o al barlovento.
5. tr. ant. Cultivar con esmero las tierras y heredades, cuidando de la conservación y aumento del ganado.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

granjear
(From granja, farm).
1. To acquire capital, to obtain earnings marketing cattle or other commercial objects.
2. To acquire, to get, to obtain.
3. To win, to attain, to attract and get wills, etc.
4. Sea. To gain, in relation to distance or to windward.
5. To carefully cultivate lands and properties, taking care of the conservation and growth of cattle.

A common expression in Spanish is, Pude granjearme su amistad, I was able to gain his/her friendship.

Saludos amistosos,

Quevedo



quevedo

May 14, 2006, 2:43 PM

Post #5 of 9 (9281 views)

Shortcut

Re: [esperanza] Mejor...

Can't Post |
"No sabe granjeársela", o "No sabe granjearse su amistad".

Saludos, amiga Esperanza,

Quevedo


da-vid

May 14, 2006, 4:36 PM

Post #6 of 9 (9267 views)

Shortcut

Re: [quevedo] Correct terminology

Can't Post | Private Reply
Dear Quevedo,
The manner in which you explained the verb granjear, showing both examples in Spanish and then English is exactly what will help me learn Spanish. Muchas gracias para su ayudar and paciencia para nostros que son appriendo Espanol.
David


zoeq1000


May 14, 2006, 7:16 PM

Post #7 of 9 (9250 views)

Shortcut

Re: [da-vid] Correct terminology

Can't Post | Private Reply
My question is then, is it used idiomatically.


Oscar2

May 14, 2006, 9:18 PM

Post #8 of 9 (9236 views)

Shortcut

Re: [esperanza] Correct terminology

Can't Post | Private Reply
Thank you Doogie, Esperanza and Quevedo,


Esperanza, the closest I come to recognizing what I’ve heard in the past is akin to your explanation: “No la sabe granjear”
Granjear means to win someone over
No la sabe granjear...He doesn't know how to win her over.

In past perhaps what I heard was sort of a catch phrase thrown out such as in passing one would say in response to lack of being kind enough or perhaps smart enough as to allow a person kindness to be responded too with an attitude of winning one over. Hence,
“no sabe a granjear” Perhaps said improperly but the gist of the message I presume still in tact. Possible?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Now on another earlier thread “Buen Provecho” was recognized as one enjoying a good meal.

On the other hand, I’ve heard them use “provecho” or something similar to it in a phrase such as: Tenga cuidado, esa persona le gusta provecharse de la gente." In this context the word “provecho or “provecharse” is used to warn someone of someone’s ill intention or to warn someone that they maybe taken advantage of. Or are they just two deferent words?


Incidently, I looked for that thread on the other title subjects which initially brought me to your forum and unless I missed it, I think it’s gone. Keep it out there, it’s a great way to stimulate beneficial interest.




(This post was edited by Oscar2 on May 15, 2006, 1:01 AM)


quevedo

May 14, 2006, 9:26 PM

Post #9 of 9 (9235 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Oscar2] Aprovecharse

Can't Post |
You may have buen provecho from a good meal. God bless you.

And you may take advantage, aprovecharse de otros: win-lose deal. Mmm...

Saludos cordiales,

Quevedo
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4