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Miguel Palomares


Apr 7, 2006, 6:14 AM

Post #1 of 32 (6586 views)

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The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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After she arrived home last night from the gym, my charming esposa
informed me that canopies are going up around the big, stunning plaza of
Tzurumutaro. They are just like the ones that are already in place on
the Plaza Grande of Patzcuaro, she says.

This is a first. It has never happened before.

Appears we will be having our own Semana Santa tianguis here.

So, as you are barreling down the highway toward Patzcuaro during the
upcoming week, stop by and take a gander. Might find things you will
not find in the Big City just three miles farther along. We are, of
course, more authentic! We do not wallow in tourism. We are the real deal.

I am sure, with time, our event will dwarf the commercial sillinesses
in Patzcuaro and Uruapan.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/



TigerTonio


Apr 7, 2006, 12:34 PM

Post #2 of 32 (6545 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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Sounds like you folks are moving up in the world! (ha) If possible, please take some photos!

I passed through Tzurumutaro this past December. Didn't see you Miguelito. Darn!


Bubba

Apr 7, 2006, 2:47 PM

Post #3 of 32 (6525 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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And here I was planning to waste my time with ordinary tourists in Patzcuaro and Uruapan this weekend when I could be in the Village of the Darned. Thanks for heading me off Miguelito.


Anonimo

Apr 7, 2006, 4:27 PM

Post #4 of 32 (6514 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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¡Ay, pobre de mi! I was composing an epic reply, and while attempting to upload photos of our Tzuru Pilgrimage, (So far, no success) I foolishly quit the browser.
Maybe I can reconstruct my pithy wit in the morning.
Let's hope so, for a fair and unbiased report is dearly needed.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


smokesilver

Apr 7, 2006, 9:41 PM

Post #5 of 32 (6482 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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Au Contraire...You will be the "real deal' indeed, with all the touristas in tow...eventually they might decide to visit the less tourist destinations of Patzquaro or Uruapan.


Anonimo

Apr 8, 2006, 3:04 AM

Post #6 of 32 (6473 views)

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A Pilgrimage to Tzurumutaro

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Based on nuestro amigo, Miguel Palomares' glowing report on the blooming of Tzuru, my wife and I made a pilgrimage, on foot, to see the Plaza of the Darned and its tents.
My first report, on MoreliaConnect, was perhaps overly harsh, in which I said that the city fathers must have purchased the tents at an Army-Navy Surplus Store, (Revolucíon Mexicana era). I now retract that statement, and would say that the tents undoubtedly serve the needs of the people, for all in tents and purposes, although I did not canvass nor poll anyone on that question.
However, it's obvious that these tents are a hand-me-down from Big Sister Pátzcuaro.

But, I am getting ahead of myself. On our way into town, we passed by El Hotelito de Mal Reputito, which as before, stands empty and quiet.
Next to it is Fortaleza Ranchito Palomares, in its quiet solitude. We hurried on by, eyes averted.

Amazingly, nearby was this Celebrity Homes Tour Bus, all the way from Oaxaca.
What was the attraction? Does Tzuru have any celebrities? ¿Quien sabe?
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/

We continued down the remaining couple of blocks of Avenida Zapata to the Plaza. There are some attractive, renovated Colonial buildings, including the Centro Gastronónico, which lured me with promises of tasty delights, but failed to deliver the goodies. It was closed.
Ahead were the tents. I didn't take any photos of them. I couldn't help but think of the Red Cross.
I've already given my opinion, so I'll say no more, in the hope of decreasing tentions.

The real eyecatcher is the magnificent kiosco. It's a splendid example of Victorian, or perhaps more accurately, Porfirian kiosquerie. I have it on the word of Tzuru's eminent bookseller, that the kiosk originally came from Pátzcuaro's Plaza Grande. I wonder when the Tzurumutarenses will return it??

Another kiosk photo:http://www.pbase.com/panos/image/58337222
In conclusion, if you are driving near Tzuru and have a few minutes, it would be worth your time to stop and see the Plaza and the kiosk. As for the tents, I wouldn't pull up stakes just to visit them.
There is a woman's museum on the Plaza as well, and I have read that it's interesting. However, it seemed to be closed yesterday.

I have learned that we are now partial residents of Tzuru, as the house we are sitting for lies in the poorly defined boundary of Pátzcuaro and Tzuru. So, as a partial resident, I have partial opinions, which made in gentle jest, should offend no one.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


Gringal

Apr 10, 2006, 4:06 PM

Post #7 of 32 (6389 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] A Pilgrimage to Tzurumutaro

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For that post, you are deserving of severe pun-ishment!


Bubba

Apr 11, 2006, 8:04 PM

Post #8 of 32 (6318 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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Well, I must say, the canopies in the plaza in Tzurumutaro are quite impressive. In fact, I understand that the overall value of the community´s housing stock increased dramatically with the construction of these temporary shelters. Not only that, the gross value of artisanal objects of art displayed between Tzintzuntzan, the main plaza in Patzcuaro and the new tianguis at Tzurumutaro went up approximately $14 Pesos wholesale with the opening of this new tourist attraction. To think I wasted my time in the Uruapan hellhole when I could have spent that time talking to the vendor in Tzurumutaro who was clearly starved for company.


Bubba

Apr 12, 2006, 9:06 AM

Post #9 of 32 (6274 views)

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Re: [Bubba] The blooming of Tzurumutaro

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Miguel Palomares wrote me a witty response to my lighthearted putdown of the Village of the Darned but he allows no private responses so I publicly thank him for amusing me.

I enjoy visiting Michoacan even though I make fun of the place on the internet. If I were more astute, I would think that, despite the fact that Uruapan is butt ugly, it has a governing council that is quite civic minded and the town puts on quite a show. Patzcuarao, on the other hand reminds me of Betty Davis making Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte when life had passed her by. Miguel, as a southerner, will understand my comment.


Miguel Palomares


Apr 12, 2006, 1:19 PM

Post #10 of 32 (6250 views)

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Village of the damned indeed

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Alas, the hopes and dreams of Tzurumutaro commercial and residential development have been dashed yet again. The Semana Santa canopy is up in the plaza, but . . . nobody is selling, and nobody is buying. Nobody is there. We wallow here in inertia.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/


Gringal

Apr 12, 2006, 2:41 PM

Post #11 of 32 (6234 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Village of the damned indeed

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Around the SMA area, Pozos is being sold as the new happening artists colony. Prices on roofless ruins are going up. Prospects for the Village of the Danged would look up, too, if you changed the name to a two syllable word everybody could pronounce on the first try and started a rumor that artists are moving there in droves. Next thing you know, Villa Palomares would double in price and you could escape to civilization.


(This post was edited by Gringal on Apr 12, 2006, 2:51 PM)


Miguel Palomares


Apr 12, 2006, 4:55 PM

Post #12 of 32 (6216 views)

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Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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Gringal opines, rightly:

Quote
If you changed the name to a two syllable word everybody could pronounce on the first try and started a rumor that artists are moving there in droves. Next thing you know, etc., etc.


Hot dang, that is a superlative idea. Forget pronouncing Tzurumutaro. It´s TZURU, pronounced Soo-Roo. Anybody can say that. Soo-Roo, you hear?! It is the up-and-coming area for sure. I just declared it so. If William Spratling can save Taxco, which he did, I can jump-start Tzuru. That is Soo-Roo!!

We have a huge, lovely, tree-lined plaza. Really. A quaint, ancient church with bats. Probably about half the locales around the plaza are sitting vacant, looking very artistic, which is to say woebegone. Think cheap. We are just three miles from the Plaza Grande of Patzcuaro where rents are high. A full 33.33 percent of Tzuru's Gringo residents are well-known artists of long repute. Soo-Roo! That is a higher percentage than in SMA. Yes, we have only three Gringos here, but one is an artist, about 98 years old, true, who was a former sweetie of John Steinbeck. Also true. Her name eludes me at the moment, but she's quite the live wire for her vintage. She pops up on PBS in the U.S. now and again, I have been told. Dang, what is that nice, old lady's name?

Ni modo. She knows an artist's haven when she sees one, been here for ages.

Soo-Roo, the artistic town of the future. I have been to Pozos. This ain't no steenking Pozos. It is far superior. And prices are right. And it is not butt-ugly like Uruapan.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/

(This post was edited by Miguel Palomares on Apr 12, 2006, 4:56 PM)


jennifer rose

Apr 12, 2006, 4:59 PM

Post #13 of 32 (6209 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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Judith Deim, whose life was featured in the 2000 movie "Ghost Bird: the Life and Art of Judith Deim."


Gringal

Apr 12, 2006, 5:06 PM

Post #14 of 32 (6205 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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Now there you go! "Tsuru" would be acceptable, too. We can handle the "Ts" o.k.
The best touch was mentioning "think cheap". Artist types can get into that. The scenery beats heck out of Pozos, too, and even the famously nippy weather is warmer than.


tonyburton / Moderator


Apr 12, 2006, 5:30 PM

Post #15 of 32 (6199 views)

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Re: [Gringal] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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You and Miguel may have to come up wth an alternative - Tsuru was popularized by Nissan years ago...
How about Mig-ville?


esperanza

Apr 12, 2006, 6:29 PM

Post #16 of 32 (6189 views)

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Re: [tonyburton] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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They could call it Nova...

;^D


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









dolores57

Apr 12, 2006, 6:56 PM

Post #17 of 32 (6181 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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Dont give up Miguel. We are taking a look at Patz or Soo-Roo or Tsuru or what ever you decide, in about 2 weeks and my husband is an artist.........a real one that actually makes a living off of his art. So if we like what we see that would be 2 artist in Patz and thats a start. d


tonyburton / Moderator


Apr 12, 2006, 7:41 PM

Post #18 of 32 (6178 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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or even Noviene...


esperanza

Apr 12, 2006, 7:48 PM

Post #19 of 32 (6173 views)

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Re: [tonyburton] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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Once in the state of Veracruz I saw a tiny abarrotes out along the highway--its name, in big red letters, was 'Llega y vete'. My all-time favorite name of a store...tsuits for Tsoo-roo, too.


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on Apr 12, 2006, 7:49 PM)


Anonimo

Apr 13, 2006, 7:05 AM

Post #20 of 32 (6146 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Pozos of Michoacan, SOO-ROO

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As long as it isn't "Tsouris".

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


jennifer rose

Apr 13, 2006, 7:36 AM

Post #21 of 32 (6134 views)

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Puttin' the Moo back into Tzurumutaro

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Remember the "Cows on Parade" exhibition a few years back when fiberglass cows adorned the streets of Chicago? The idea was replicated by other cities, and it should be Tzurumutaro's turn now. Who needs any more artesania when they can have real cows, a cow in every cochera? And I can think of no better master of ceremonies to kick it all off than Kinky Friedman.


esperanza

Apr 13, 2006, 9:05 AM

Post #22 of 32 (6116 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Puttin' the Moo back into Tzurumutaro

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Cows are currently on parade in various spots in the DF. They're fiberglass, made by artists, sponsored by businesses, and similar to the Chicago cows--although none has kicked over a lantern yet to start the Great Mexico City Fire.


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on Apr 13, 2006, 9:06 AM)


Miguel Palomares


Apr 13, 2006, 9:11 AM

Post #23 of 32 (6114 views)

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TZURUMUTARO, an artist's dream destination

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Yes, Tzuru is indeed the artist's dream come true. Here are more reasons why: Though 15 minutes from Patzcuaro's Plaza Grande, we have little in common with that tourist town just up the highway. We are humble and authentic. And inexpensive.

We have no For Sale signs. Anywhere. The only two I have seen in the four years I have lived here were on my property and the property across the street. Both were snapped up rapidly by the sage and wise. The other guy is a Mexican. Well, actually, so am I, but I digress.

However, there are properties for sale. I have learned that simply asking around the area turns up quite a few. The locals have the old Mexican attitude. It will sell. Or it won't. What can we do? And they do nothing.

But they are there. Huge open lots with or without half-finished houses. Perhaps needs some work, but for what you pay for a hovel in San Miguel, you can get far more here. You would have to put in some elbow work, of course. Some extra cash. But albaniles are reasonably priced here. For the uninitiated, that is the local word for guys who build things. And before you feministas fly off the handle, it is guys, always. Our womenfolk slap tortillas and tend the home fires. The way it has always been, as God intended.

We remain very traditional in Tzuru. We go to Mass a lot. We have religious processions through the streets with candles, and they are not being done to entertain tourists either. There are no tourists. They are all on the highway over there floorboarding it directly to Patzcuaro.

About once a month, a sound stage is thrown up on the big, beautiful plaza, and we party into the dark night. For Carnival and other such days, we wear costumes of devils and evil beings, homemade wigs of horsehair. Small bands of trumpets, clarinets and a tuba roam the streets. All of this is true.

There, as I have said, are only three Gringos here in Tzuru. The long-lived artist Judith Diem, an international bookseller named Will who has a bookstore in his house (which is for sale, by the way. A nice house), and yours truly, a crank. It is what SMA was, perhaps, in the 1940s. Few people here have cars. Public transport is plentiful, cheap and, uh, very exciting.

And the state capital of Morelia is only 40 minutes away on a clean, 4-lane highway.

Tzurumutaro, the thinking artist's destination in Mexico. And, unlike Pozos, it is not sitting over polluted ground from years of mining. Nobody here has ever had sufficient initative to mine.

That's all. It's time to swing in my hammock in the cool breeze off the mountains. Watch the April swallows. A margarita and a good book at the ready. (But, whoops! I don't imbibe.) Perhaps a burro will pass by out on Zapata Street, Tzuru's main drag and street of distinction. Or perhaps I will suppress a naughty and smug chuckle thinking of artists (or anyone who is thinking of moving to Mexico) who have paid stunning sums to settle elsewhere.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/

(This post was edited by Miguel Palomares on Apr 13, 2006, 9:12 AM)


Gringal

Apr 13, 2006, 10:10 AM

Post #24 of 32 (6097 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] TZURUMUTARO, an artist's dream destination

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"I will suppress a naughty and smug chuckle thinking of artists (or anyone who is thinking of moving to Mexico) who have paid stunning sums to settle elsewhere."
____________________________________________________________________

Good job! Beats the Lakeside II campaign by a mile!

You just needed to target the right market. How does anyone think the dry, dusty and barren burg of SMA got going? Right behind the artists come the hangers-on, followed swiftly by the real estate sharks. Stunning sums are paid to revel in the ambiance.

Soon, Patz will be a fading memory, overshadowed by the new Tsuru - charming, scenic and (ta da) Artistic! Soon, you will have authors' salas, foreign film fests, galleries, gurus, and deep tissue massages. A lifesyle facelift doc will give a new look to the ladies. Why ever leave?

How does that go? Ah yes. "Be careful what you wish for"


bournemouth

Apr 13, 2006, 10:52 AM

Post #25 of 32 (6091 views)

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Re: [Gringal] TZURUMUTARO, an artist's dream destination

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Gringal - don't you get the impression that the original poster is lonely and looking for some company? Or that he wishes to become the local real estate agent?
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