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Anonimo

Feb 27, 2006, 2:01 AM

Post #1 of 20 (4873 views)

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Cilantro's Health Benefits

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I saw this link on the Lonelyplanet.com Thorn Tree's Get Stuffed Forum
http://www.whfoods.com/...oodspice&dbid=70

It's nice to know that fresh cilantro may be beneficial to my health, becuase I love the stuff! However, earlier opinions were tendinding to say the improperly washed cilantro is a leading cause of intestinal illness at restaurants and taquerías.
This

Quote
A Few Quick Serving Ideas:

In a saucepan over low heat, combine vanilla soymilk, honey, coriander and cinnamon for a delicious beverage.

doesn't sound too delicious to me.



Saludos,
Anonimo



caldwelld


Feb 27, 2006, 6:33 AM

Post #2 of 20 (4863 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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The article is about corriander seeds not fresh cilantro. Do you have a reference specific to fresh cilantro? I love the stuff as well. I also use the fresh roots to make a great Thai soup. Great stuff!
dondon


drmike

Feb 27, 2006, 8:42 AM

Post #3 of 20 (4853 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Cilantro is an extremely healthful herb. Full of anti-oxidants, may be anti-bacterial/parasite, but definitely will help chelate out mercury. If you eat a lot of fish there is a chance your mercury levels may be elevated. Mercury is a well known neurotoxin. Cilantro will chelate the mercury and help remove it from your tissues. If you eat a lot of fish then increase your intake of cilantro. As with all vegetables, be sure to wash thoroughly, or even use a vegetable spray to cleanse the cilantro. Cilantro is a very friendly, supportive herb.

I, too love it and eat some almost daily.
Dr. Mike

http://www.smarthealthchoices.blogspot.com

There are hundreds of paths up the mountain,
all leading in the same direction,
so it doesn't matter which path you take.
The only one wasting time is the one
who runs around and around the mountain,
telling everyone that his or her path is wrong.


Hindu teaching



wendy devlin

Feb 27, 2006, 11:11 AM

Post #4 of 20 (4842 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Probably most of you are not thinking about growing your own cilantro...but in my opinion it's exceptional easy to grow.

I grow rows of cilantro...but then I also sell it at an weekend farmers' market May to October.

Sow about every 3-4 weeks for a continuous supply...and let a few plants go to seed. One cilantro plant gone to seed will give you cilantro or coriander for years:)

Also it is a preferred host plant for the larva of certain butterflies...like the giant swallowtail. The caterpillars are huge, bright green with yellow...thank goodness...they're for us....not against!

And the tiny flowers of the flowering cilantro attracts parastic wasps, another useful beneficial insect in the garden, given their larva feast on other pests.


(This post was edited by wendy devlin on Feb 27, 2006, 11:12 AM)


Gayla

Feb 27, 2006, 11:34 AM

Post #5 of 20 (4836 views)

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Re: [wendy devlin] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Wendy, in what kind of soil does cilantro do best? What I've got in here in my part of San Diego is pretty pathetic. Very dense, lots of clay. Weeds and epazote (oh wiat that is a weed) thrive but anything else has to really be babied before it will get established. Augmenting helps but isn't always the answer <sigh>.


DoDi2


Feb 27, 2006, 11:57 AM

Post #6 of 20 (4826 views)

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Re: [Gayla] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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In Reply To
... Weeds and epazote (oh wiat that is a weed) thrive....


Actually, fresh epazote is not only used in some delicous Mexican dishes.. but it's also useful medicinally. One common use is to cook beans with some epazote in order to lower thier 'gassy' side effect. Another... in rural Mexico mothers will feed epazote to thier children to purge intestinal worms.


drmike

Feb 27, 2006, 11:58 AM

Post #7 of 20 (4824 views)

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Re: [Gayla] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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As a naturopathic physician I do and always have grown a lot of herbs. I tried to grow cilantro here in Tempe, Arizona and after going to seed (coriander) the plants died and I could not get them to grow any longer. Too hot and dry, I guess. When I live in a more hospitable environment I look forward to growing cilantro, again.

You are lucky, Wendy to be able to do so.
Dr. Mike

http://www.smarthealthchoices.blogspot.com

There are hundreds of paths up the mountain,
all leading in the same direction,
so it doesn't matter which path you take.
The only one wasting time is the one
who runs around and around the mountain,
telling everyone that his or her path is wrong.


Hindu teaching



Gayla

Feb 27, 2006, 12:03 PM

Post #8 of 20 (4820 views)

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Re: [DoDi2] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Yep. Can't make a pot of black beans without epazote. They just don't taste right :-D


Bubba

Feb 27, 2006, 1:17 PM

Post #9 of 20 (4814 views)

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Re: [caldwelld] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Caldwelld is correct:

Anonimo's recipe is calling for coriander seeds, not fresh coriander or what is locally called cilantro. Coriander seeds are an essential ingredient in much East Indian cuisine and is a basic ingredient in what westerners know as "curry".

I think Anonimo's recipe sounds pretty good if one knows to use ground coriander seeds as opposed to the leafy herb they produce.

Cilantro is generally known as chinese parsley in California.

Coriander roots are wonderful and used prolifically in Thai cooking. Almost always in California and often here in Mexico, people sell you cilantro without the roots. Your loss.

Here is an exotic alternative for some of you who are adventurous but it has nothing to do with coriander:

Make some turkish coffee.
Sweeten that coffee and add cardamom seeds

If you don't know how to make turkish coffee then just stay where you are 'cause you ain't goin' nowhere.

Here is a good salsa:

Lime juice
Chopped Cilantro
Mashed garlic
Chopped Serrano or Habanero Chiles
Sugar or Splenda

Dip yo grits in this brother and you will be a changed person


(This post was edited by Bubba on Feb 27, 2006, 1:19 PM)


wendy devlin

Feb 27, 2006, 2:23 PM

Post #10 of 20 (4804 views)

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Re: [Gayla] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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What kind of soil...does cilantro like?

Mine is heavy clay, amended generously with sand and compost so that it is friable. Leafy cilantro is quick growing...at its prime in a month or two, depending on your growing conditions.

Then the plant puts it's energy into producing several tall flowering stems. You can try to pick those stems and leaves until all that's left is some nude sticks.

The plant will poop out on you however and stop producing leaves:)

It wants to go to seed...real bad. That's why planting cilantro every few weeks ensures a continuous supply.

As for the roots, I've never eaten them. Something new to try!

But then just found out in recent years, about the fast-growing seed stems of the rocambole garlic. These long green twisting stems are among the most delicious fresh greens I've ever tasted.

Mild garlic taste with the snap and texture of fresh asparagus. Raw, steamed or sauteed. Or my favorite...cooked for 5 minutes on a cookie tray in the oven, seasoned to taste, at 450-500 degrees F.

And all these years, snapping these stems off...and throwing them in the compost!


Bubba

Feb 27, 2006, 3:15 PM

Post #11 of 20 (4796 views)

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Re: [wendy devlin] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Wendy:

Since, for some reason, I like you, here goes:

Thai Fried Chicken

8 Cloves garlic
2 Tablespoons Freshly Gound Peppercors
2 Tablespoons Coriander Roots
Chicken Pieces

Pound the coriander root, garlic and peppercorns to a paste. Marinate the chicken in this paste for a couple of hours. Deep fry the chicken. Serve with rice and, if you wish, Sweet & Sour Hot Chile Sauce. which is a blend of yellow raisins, white vinegar, red chile flakes, a whole bunch of garlic, salt, fresh red chiles, canned tomatoes. red plum jam. pineapple juice and brown sugar.

If you don't like this just go ahead and shoot yourself.


(This post was edited by Bubba on Feb 27, 2006, 3:16 PM)


wendy devlin

Feb 28, 2006, 8:51 AM

Post #12 of 20 (4764 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Bubba, you must be psych-kick!

I planned to make chicken some way today.

Now to find me some cilantro roots.
Ground outside being frozen and all. Have to trip down the hill to the supermarket.

Forgot to mention yesterday...those curly, snake-like garlic stems are called scapes. Have you eaten them?


sfmacaws


Mar 1, 2006, 3:50 PM

Post #13 of 20 (4740 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Bubba, here's some Guatemala info for you. By the way, are you still headed this way? We are in Panajachel now.

I discovered that Guatemala is the number one exporter of cardamom and India is number two. Almost none of it is available locally though as it is not used by local cooks. I did find some ground in Antigua and on the advice of a chocolatier there I put it in my coffee instead of cinammon - fantastic! There is one exotic spice and coffee company here in Guatemala, Deliciosa, that grinds and sells it. I don't know if they also sell whole seeds, they weren't available where I was shopping. I had a hand-made dark chocolate and cardamom truffle that was exquisite.


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




Bubba

Mar 2, 2006, 9:08 AM

Post #14 of 20 (4716 views)

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Re: [wendy devlin] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Wendy:

I wish you luck but I would not be surprised if your local supermakets remove and discard the roots which are substantial. You may have to grow your own when spring comes. There is no substitute for coriander root.

Jonna:

No, we can't make it to Guatemala this year. We opted instead for a tour of Guanajuato State intending to head over to Puebla & Veracruz after that but the weather was lousy with copious rains and cold temperatures so, after a couple of days in San Miguel and Guanajuato, we headed back to Lake Chapala and did the Michoacan/Puerto Vallarta excursion.. Despite the really bad weather, we were impressed with the beauty of San Miguel and Guanajuato although neither town appeals to us as a place to move. Too steep and crowded. In addition, San Miguel is a little too impressed with itself. We've lived in such insufferable places in the past and found that, after a while, all of this pride in where one lives is tiring to the listener.

We also flipped over Atotonilco between San Miguel and Dolores Hidalgo. The church there is not to be missed.


(This post was edited by Bubba on Mar 3, 2006, 6:20 AM)


sfmacaws


Mar 2, 2006, 10:07 PM

Post #15 of 20 (4697 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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yes, the church in Atontonilco is spectacular. We were there last year and they were doing a lot of restoration work. We could get in to all but I think one side chapel. Really gorgeous. I took some pictures but due to the no flash rule I could only get good shots up by the roof where windows let in natural light.

I kind of agree with you about San Miguel, plus I hate cobblestones and cold weather. It's got some beautiful buildings but the countryside around it is pretty barren and ugly. Antigua has all the same beautiful colonial buildings, and the cobblestones, but it is in a much more beautiful area. Didn't check the real estate prices but I'm sure they are close to those in SMA. Since we are in the Kitchen forum I'll say that the food was great too. Another great meal in an Argentine restuarant, I've yet to be disappointed in one and even loved the Uruguayan restaurant here in Panajachel.


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




Bubba

Mar 3, 2006, 6:26 AM

Post #16 of 20 (4688 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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I must say - Antigua, Guatemala just may be the most beautiful city and setting for a city in the Americas. There was a civil war going on in the 80s when we visited so we never thought of buying there then. Too bad. I hope you and Mimi don't think you are driving back north without stopping in Ajijic to pass on your experiences even though you will have to negotiate some cobblestone streets.


Anonimo

Mar 3, 2006, 7:55 AM

Post #17 of 20 (4681 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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We have wandered off course from "cilantro's health benefits".
Just thought I'd mention that.



Saludos,
Anonimo


Bubba

Mar 3, 2006, 9:06 AM

Post #18 of 20 (4675 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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You know, Anonimo, there was a certain "school marm" quality to that posting but I forgive you since bakers must exhibit a certain precision of thought in order to be successful at their craft. Bankers. on the other hand, are expected to be imprecise and of wandering thought patterrns.

However, I can tell you this. Until some time in the late 1970s or early 1980s, one could not find cilantro, or Chinese parsley, in Northern California unless one went to a latino market. Also, at Northern California supermarkets, they used to give away curley leafed parsley for free but not Italian parsley.

So there. We are now back on track.


Anonimo

Mar 3, 2006, 2:02 PM

Post #19 of 20 (4663 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Thank you, Bubba.



Saludos,
Anonimo


caldwelld


Mar 4, 2006, 6:35 AM

Post #20 of 20 (4643 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Cilantro's Health Benefits

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Just a little diversion - In my experience with bankers I would rather deal with a baker. Retired bankers on the other hand seem to be ok.
dondon
 
 
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