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Marta R

Oct 21, 2005, 10:02 AM

Post #1 of 21 (2329 views)

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brace for Wilma 2

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Apparently the original Wilma thread was locked at 17 posts, perhaps because of the mention of grits.

In any event, here's the latest from Reuters:


Quote

PLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mexico (Reuters) - Hurricane Wilma's fierce winds and rain battered Mexico's famed Caribbean beach resorts on Friday, knocking over trees and trapping thousands of nervous tourists inside cramped shelters.


Powerful waves swallowed up white sand beaches in the popular resort of Cancun and electricity was cut all along Mexico's "Maya Riviera" and on the island of Cozumel, a favorite of scuba divers and cruise ship passengers.

Sturdy tropical trees danced in howling winds and others lay toppled in empty and flooded streets in the resort of Playa del Carmen, just south of Cancun. Snapped electricity cables dangled above the streets, sending sparks flying.

"The sound of the wind is what is frightening," said Rossy Mischne, who was holed up inside the Cozumel hotel where she works.

Stinging rains gathered strength as Wilma, a Category 4 hurricane, moved in slowly from the Caribbean with winds of 145 mph. Forecasters warned the storm could cause catastrophic damage.

Emergency officials warned the slow-moving storm could linger over the Yucatan peninsula and dump torrential rains across southern Mexico, raising the risk of lethal mudslides and damage to coffee crops.

At one gymnasium in Cancun, about 1,600 people slept on mattresses and ate canned food. A local entrepreneur sold T-shirts with the hopeful logo: "I Survived Hurricane Wilma."

Mexican emergency officials said more than 50,000 people were evacuated and about 17,000 were put in shelters such as schools, gymnasiums and hotel conference rooms further inland.

Hundreds of construction workers, most from the southern state of Chiapas, were moved from their temporary lodgings in outdoor camps and building sites in Playa del Carmen.

In a kindergarten classroom near the beach, 50 men sat on the concrete floor of a classroom, too cramped to lie down, eating with their hands from cans of donated tuna fish.

"This sucks," said Juan Cruz Perez, a 21-year-old metal worker from the Gulf state of Tabasco.

The storm was expected to dump 10 to 20 inches of rain across the Yucatan and isolated areas of mountainous western Cuba. Some areas could get up to 40 inches , the U.S. National Hurricane Center said in Miami.


Marta



Kip


Oct 21, 2005, 10:25 AM

Post #2 of 21 (2311 views)

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Re: [Marta Randall] brace for Wilma 2

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Thanks for the update Marta. Our local news is actually giving it pretty good coverage but not nearly as in depth as this.
kip


bournemouth

Oct 21, 2005, 12:18 PM

Post #3 of 21 (2284 views)

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Re: [Marta Randall] brace for Wilma 2

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Esperanza's quote of Max Mayfield in the previous thread may not actually be all he said. If you read the CNN story on the right hand side of the Mexconnect home page, he says "that will be terrible news for Mexico etc etc." The New York Times may have abbreviated his statement, presumably reflecting their view point.


Kip


Oct 21, 2005, 1:02 PM

Post #4 of 21 (2269 views)

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Re: [bournemouth] brace for Wilma 2

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I've been watching the weather channel and right now the eye of Wilma is directly over Cozumel and is heading straight for Cancun. They said that a lot of beaches have just disappeared due to erosion. I hope the people who chose to ride it out understand what they're in for and are adequately prepared. It doesn't look good.
kip


Ed and Fran

Oct 21, 2005, 2:01 PM

Post #5 of 21 (2247 views)

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Re: [Kip] brace for Wilma 2

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I hope the people who chose to ride it out understand what they're in for...

If we're talking about the local Q.R. residents, it's usually not a question of "choosing to ride it out", as much as it is simply their only option, with the exception of the possibility of a local shelter being available for some.


and are adequately prepared...

Again, for a huge number of locals, "preparation", being limited to what they can reasonably do, will consist only in laying in an additional garrafon of drinking water, filling some plastic tubs with water, and buying what bread, tortillas, beans and or rice may have been left on the local market shelves. Not many options such as running down to your nearby Home Depot for a few sheets of plywood and a generator for most of them.



Regards

Ed


Kip


Oct 21, 2005, 2:09 PM

Post #6 of 21 (2245 views)

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Re: [Ed and Fran] brace for Wilma 2

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I'm sorry, I didn't mean it the way it sounded. I guess after New Orleans got mauled it freaks me out to know that there are people in the direct path of that monster.
kip


johanson


Oct 21, 2005, 2:17 PM

Post #7 of 21 (2243 views)

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Re: [Ed and Fran] brace for Wilma 2

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I am not debating you Ed and Fran, because I bet there are a lot of people who can not leave. But the people I hear interviewed on CNN all seem to be medium to high income Anglos who could leave Cancun.

I have a friend from Mexico City whose 19 year old daughter chose to stay in Cancun with her boy friend's family. They are upper middle class Mexicans. Many of these folks who could leave chose not to leave, to the chagrin of my friend who is very angry with his daughter.

So yes, I bet that there are many who could not leave, but there are also many who could have left, but chose not to.


(This post was edited by johanson on Oct 21, 2005, 2:19 PM)


Ed and Fran

Oct 21, 2005, 2:43 PM

Post #8 of 21 (2234 views)

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Re: [johanson] brace for Wilma 2

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Kip: I'm sorry, I didn't mean it the way it sounded.


Me too, because I didn' t take your comment that way at all, especially given your great track record here. And I guess I should have been a bit more careful with the way I phrased my comment to have avoided sounding critical.


Pete: I am not debating you Ed and Fran, because I bet there are a lot of people who can not leave. But the people I hear interviewed on CNN all seem to be medium to high income Anglos who could leave Cancun.


I agree 100%. Most, if not all, of those were in a position to bail out earlier in teh week, or at least take a bus to Merida or points west. If you listen to CNN you'd get the impression that the only people in Cancun were vacationers from up north.



Blue skies with scattered clouds here in Tuxpan.

Regards

E&F


Kip


Oct 21, 2005, 2:49 PM

Post #9 of 21 (2232 views)

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Re: [Ed and Fran] brace for Wilma 2

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No problem E&F. When I reread it sounded that way to me!

Kip
kip


Marta R

Oct 21, 2005, 3:58 PM

Post #10 of 21 (2221 views)

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Re: [johanson] brace for Wilma 2

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Reuters says this about evacuations:


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Mexican emergency officials said more than 50,000 people were evacuated and about 17,000 were put in schools, gymnasiums and hotel conference rooms further inland.


I don't know if that means 50,000 tourists or 50,000 everybody.

Edited to add this, from the same story:


Quote
This hurricane season has spawned three of the most-intense storms on record. Experts say the Atlantic has entered a period of heightened storm activity that could last 20 more years.


Marta


(This post was edited by Marta Randall on Oct 21, 2005, 3:59 PM)


Ed and Fran

Oct 21, 2005, 4:39 PM

Post #11 of 21 (2204 views)

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Re: [Marta Randall] brace for Wilma 2

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I don't know if that means 50,000 tourists or 50,000 everybody.


While I'd suspect it's largely tourists, either way it's just a drop in the bucket. The population of that area, including everything between Cancun / Playa del Carmen / Cozumel has to be around 500,000, not counting tourists.


Experts say the Atlantic has entered a period of heightened storm activity that could last 20 more years.


Global warming, the Twilight Zone, or normal global climate cycles.............


Regards

E&F (who have been pretty fortunate this year in Tuxpan....)


Ed and Fran

Oct 21, 2005, 4:43 PM

Post #12 of 21 (2203 views)

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Re: [Ed and Fran] brace for Wilma 2

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By the way, this is the best site I've found for hurricane info and discussion. Lots of info and links. The discussion board is interesting too.

http://flhurricane.com/


Here's one particular shot from the same website that you might like to see. Great shot of the eye over Cozumel.

http://flhurricane.com/...5&o=&fpart=1


Regards

E&F


Marta R

Oct 22, 2005, 10:12 AM

Post #13 of 21 (2125 views)

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Re: [Ed and Fran] brace for Wilma 2

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Wow. Aside from amazement at the technology that can take such a shot, it's a good reminder of how close everything is to everything else: the peninsula, Cozumel, Cuba...

Marta


Miguel Palomares


Oct 23, 2005, 7:39 AM

Post #14 of 21 (2031 views)

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Re: [Marta Randall] Grits and self-interest

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Grits, grits, grits. I love grits. Harboring a sea of butter. Ain't no grits to be found in Mexico. Another good reason to stay in Georgia.

Speaking of grits, I am so glad Marta reopened this topic because when I went to the previous one to counter something one of our posters said, it was all locked up!

That old boy was saying how dreadful it was that a Gringo weathercaster voiced the opinion that it would be nice if the storm stalled over Mexico and did not hit the U.S. with full force.

He saw this as just another example of bad ole Gringo selfish attitude. Judging from what I often read here, I am sure others were clacking their teeth with so much nodding of their noodles. Heads, that is.

And what, one wonders, should be the proper attitude of one in the U.S.? I can hear the weatherman now: "Well, folks, with luck the storm will rush right over Yucatan and come up here and knock the beejeepers out of our Gulf Coast. Again!"

Or another scenario: If the goddess changed the usual weather pattern, making hurricanes run north to south instead of vice versa, can you imagine a Mexican weatherman saying: "Bueno, mis paisanos. Con suerte, the hurricane will just bounce lightly off the Texas coast and come straight to Veracruz to give us a good shellacking!"

All of which is to say that self-interest is a human trait, and has nothing to do with being a selfish, mean old Gringo.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/

(This post was edited by Miguel Palomares on Oct 23, 2005, 7:40 AM)


Gringal

Oct 23, 2005, 8:35 AM

Post #15 of 21 (2010 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Grits and self-interest

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Anything, harboring a sea of butter. Even oatmeal. Make a crater in the middle, drop in the butter, then the dark brown sugar. This will nullify any heart-healthy aspects of the dish and turn it into actual lip-smacking food.

On hurricane reporting: your point is well taken. It isn't meanness; just human nature to wish the disaster somewhere else; the farther away the better. Newscasters know this, so it's pointless to stone them for reflecting the gut feelings of the majority.


Bubba

Oct 23, 2005, 11:08 AM

Post #16 of 21 (1971 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Grits and self-interest

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It is entirely acceptable for a weather reporter to observe that if a hurricane or other weather phenomenon changes course or is modified by external factors, it will impact the planet in a manner different than the manner originally anticipated. The observation that one area will benefit should a storm stall over an intervening land mass in its path is a legitimate and potentially important observation. For that presumably objective reporter to express the "hope" that one area will be spared because of factors that create even more destruction elsewhere is not acceptable.

On the other hand, it is entirley acceptable, if not particularly nice, for Bubba to hope that a storm such as Hurricane Wilma misses the Yucatan altogether and, consequently, causes terrible devastation in Florida so that rational people will see the efficacy of moving to Highland Mexico as an alternative to the Hurricane Belt thereby driving up the value of Bubba's house because of increased demand for housing hereabouts.

Praying for deliverance from a potentially catastrophic event based upon the mean-spirited suggestion to the Almighty that that inevitable event visit one's neighbors is a supplication which is deserving of additional rehabilitative time in purgatory regardless of what eventually actually happens.

As for grits, that corn based gruel is indeed available in the Lake Chapala area Sr. Palomares. Perhaps you would find Lakeside I more to your liking.

Grits, like most staples made from various types of grains or roots , is (grits being singular) only as good as the imagination of the cook and consumer. Try eating grits, white long-grain rice, cous cous or manioc meal without a savory accompaniment.

Grits is actually a part of our Southern heritage from Africa so here is an interesting way to prepare that dish:

MOZAMBIQUE STYLE DEEP-FRIED GRITS-SHRIMP BALLS

1 Cup Regular (not quick-cooking) White Hominy Grits
5 Cups Water containing dried hot red chiles to taste, a bunch of chopped garlic, a bay leaf and salt.

Stir and cook this concoction until the liquid has been absorbed but the grits grains are still a little bit course.

Set this aside to cool.

After it's cooled, combine the grits in a large bowl with:

A Cup or so of Finely Chopped Onions
Some Flat Leaf Italian Parsley (or, what the hell, Cilantro)
An Egg Yolk or Two
A little more Salt

Knead this mixture vigorously with your hands.

Boil and shell about a 1/2 Kilo of Shrimp in a salted broth the way you like your shrimp. Then cut the shrimp into manageable pieces.

Make grits balls with your hands and stuff each ball with a piece of shrimp.

Dip the grits balls into an egg batter and then roll the balls into a breading of your choice.

Refrigerate for at least 20 minutes.

Deep fry these shrimp/grits balls until properly browned.

You might want to make a dipping sauce for your shrimp/grits balls. There are many dipping sauces that go with this so you choose.

Grits is on subject when it comes to discussing dangerous tropical storms since the residue from this grits recipe can be used in the place of plywood to cover and protect windows and doors from wind damage.


(This post was edited by Bubba on Oct 23, 2005, 11:12 AM)


Gringal

Oct 23, 2005, 11:19 AM

Post #17 of 21 (1961 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Grits and self-interest

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After eating those grits, Bubba, one should be able to levitate to a place of safety during a hurricane or any other natural disaster.


Miguel Palomares


Oct 23, 2005, 2:28 PM

Post #18 of 21 (1929 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Grits and self-interest

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Grits is/are available in Lakeside One?! Man, oh man, Gringolandia transplanted to Mexico. Why is I not surprised?

Looks like a good recipe, but grits is best made normal-like, a wet pile with a lake of melted butter in the middle, sitting next to two runny fried eggs. Toasted white bread to mop the whole mess up. Yum.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/


jennifer rose

Oct 23, 2005, 2:59 PM

Post #19 of 21 (1917 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Grits and self-interest

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In my refrigerator sits a 24-oz. box of Quaker Quick Grits, never opened. How much am I offered?


Miguel Palomares


Oct 23, 2005, 3:32 PM

Post #20 of 21 (1905 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Grits and self-interest

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Quick grits indeed! Southern boys only accept the long-cooking method, best done by a woman 'of color' who has raised you from babyhood. Mine was named Willy. Long gone now. Buried and hidden among the weeds somewhere outside Sylvester, Georgia. Sad but true.
From Tzurumutaro, Michoacan, "The Village of the Darned."
_______________________________________

The nuts and bolts of moving to Mexico:
http://michaeldickson.blogspot.com/
The dark side of living in Mexico:
http://mexicopeeks.blogspot.com/
Scintillating life in a Mexican pueblo:
http://tzurumutaro.blogspot.com/
http://tzurumutaro2.blogspot.com/

(This post was edited by Miguel Palomares on Oct 23, 2005, 3:32 PM)


Marta R

Oct 23, 2005, 4:12 PM

Post #21 of 21 (1893 views)

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Re: [Miguel Palomares] Grits and self-interest

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Is it possible that we can stick to the topic at hand?

Marta
 
 
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