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futant

Jun 13, 2005, 9:23 AM

Post #1 of 11 (3957 views)

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Water well drillers. . .??

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Anyone know the name(s) and addresses or local phone #s for experienced local water well driller(s) (who, maybe if I'm lucky, speak English)?

I'm still seeking info about Lakeside's future water supply from the local groundwater before scheduling an exploratory pre-move trip there. I posted before about this in April and have kept on coming up empty in the info dept since then, though I've written many people many emails. Struck me that maybe one of the local water well drillers would know. They are often very informed about such things here; often know better than the academic hydrologists where to drill and where not to. Maybe it's the same there.

And while I'm asking: Maybe one of you knows someone in the area who's very knowledgeable on this subject. If I can't email and need to call him/her on the phone, I'll be happy to do that.

This informaton is very important to me, and I'll be grateful like mad for any help.

Thanks,

David



1ajijic


Jun 13, 2005, 3:51 PM

Post #2 of 11 (3915 views)

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Re: [futant] Water well drillers. . .??

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I've heard two points on well drilling. One is that a permit is almost impossible to get hereabouts.

The other is that the driller would get the permit. Both possibly absolutely true in Mexico. Most developed areas have their own wells. Which is one of the advantages of NOT building in the outskirts. Several years ago, in the midst of a severe drought, wells were drying up. On the advice of a friend I checked my tenaca and it was full.

How deep would you need to drill? what would be the quality of your water? Depends!

I had my own wells for over 35 years. Here I'd rather depend on "city water" for dependable supply.

BTW last trip back to the US I got tourista from the water.
http://www.newbeginningsmexico.com


futant

Jun 13, 2005, 4:26 PM

Post #3 of 11 (3908 views)

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Re: [1ajijic] Water well drillers. . .??

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>I've heard two points on well drilling. One is that a permit is almost impossible to get hereabouts.

The other is that the driller would get the permit. Both possibly absolutely true in Mexico.

Anybody know the names, addresses and/or phone # for such a driller? Any idea who issues the permits either for the municipalities or individuals or real estate developments?

> Most developed areas have their own wells. Which is one of the advantages of NOT building in the outskirts. Several years ago, in the midst of a severe drought, wells were drying up. On the advice of a friend I checked my tenaca and it was full.

Sounds like you're saying the groundwater supply is concnetrated near the lake or near the towns, but one correspondent told me the municipal wells are up in the hills behind the towns; not right down near the lake. Be an important thing to know.

Is a tenaca a cistern? My Spanish dictionary doesn't have the word. If yes, is it a rainwater cistern only or also a reservoir for well water that's needed because the wells have low production rates? Are many houses built or retrofit in the area with catchment arrangements on the roof piped into cisterns?

>How deep would you need to drill? what would be the quality of your water? Depends!

I had my own wells for over 35 years. Here I'd rather depend on "city water" for dependable supply.

Anyone have any idea whether any of the city water wells have ever gone dry? If yes, were there enough other operating ones to handle the problem? Was there water rationing in force before the wells dried up?

If the wells are vulnerable:

1) Have there ever been any thoughts to build a putification plant for lake water just for Lakeside? (There must be such a plant for the portion of lake water used in Guadalajara, yes? Or do they take it as is, pollution and all?)
2) Has there been a recent drought when the street vendors supplying drinking water also were running short?

Thanks for your reply. As you see, I have a number of questions. If you don't know the answers, do you know someone who does? Or someone who knows someone who does. . ?

All the best,

David


Rolly


Jun 13, 2005, 5:06 PM

Post #4 of 11 (3896 views)

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Re: [futant] Water well drillers. . .??

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"Is a tenaca a cistern? "

The correct spelling is tinaco. Usually it is a black plastic water tank on the roof. A cistern = aljibe is usually a brick/concrete vessel in the ground. It is not uncommon for a tinaco tank to be buired in the ground (I have one). In such a case some will call it a tinaco, some will call it an aljibe. Around where I live it is called a tinaco.

Rolly Pirate


(This post was edited by Rolly on Jun 13, 2005, 5:07 PM)


Ed and Fran

Jun 13, 2005, 5:48 PM

Post #5 of 11 (3889 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Water well drillers. . .??

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In addition to on the roof or in the ground tanks, there is what we call the 'pileta', a masonry tank built on top of the ground, but with the same purpose.

Some people have both a pileta or aljibe, with a tinaco on the roof. Often the municipal water pressure isn't enough (temporarily) to get the water up to the roof. In this case you get to fill the pileta and then either pump it up to your tinaco, or just get the water from the ground level tank (in which case it isn't necessarily being piped through your house's water pipes).


Regards

E&F


Esteban

Jun 13, 2005, 6:29 PM

Post #6 of 11 (3880 views)

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Re: [futant] Water well drillers. . .??

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Hope there are no well drillers listening but I've worked for many, over the years, and most in the US don't speak English :-). What I mean is that they are a rough crowd in a dangerous business that has not been closely regulated by government authorities. They are a unique bunch of guys who still believe in witching for water and who know you have to develop a feel for where the water is located even if you find the acquifer. It's a little more scientific when you are working for large public systems but in the rural water trade, it's still like the old west. I worked for a guy who learned the business from his father. His father was running the drilling rig by himself, got his arm caught up in some rope and the cathead and off came the arm. He stopped the bleeding and drove himself to the hospital. Macho man.

I too have thought about a little place in the country with my own well and a nice solar powered submersible to keep my tinaco filled. You'll have to do your homework to make sure the well is developed and installed properly. Things you have to look at are casing, screening, tested pumping levels, sealing, possible water contamination from things in the nearby area and a few other aspects of this tricky business. I remember, in the high desert of Oregon, people would come from California, buy 10 acres for $5000 dollars and spend $15,000 on a well that produced no more than 5 gallons a minute. Be sure to do your homework.


patricio_lintz


Jun 13, 2005, 6:41 PM

Post #7 of 11 (3874 views)

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Re: [futant] Water well drillers. . .??

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A major water purification plant is on the shores of lake Chapala between Chapala and San Nicholas, on the road to Mezcala. I have been told that it supplies Guadalajara.

I have seen classes of children touring the place.


futant

Jun 13, 2005, 6:45 PM

Post #8 of 11 (3873 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Water well drillers. . .??

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>The correct spelling is tinaco. Usually it is a black plastic water tank on the roof. A cistern = aljibe is usually a brick/concrete vessel in the ground. It is not uncommon for a tinaco tank to be buired in the ground (I have one). In such a case some will call it a tinaco, some will call it an aljibe. Around where I live it is called a tinaco.

Aha!! Thanks, I was wondering a lot about those words.

One further Q: Are either or both of those gathering rainwater or only well water?

-=d=-


Esteban

Jun 13, 2005, 7:03 PM

Post #9 of 11 (3863 views)

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Re: [futant] Water well drillers. . .??

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A tinaco is a tank made of plastic or a mixture of portland cement and asbestos. Actually, a tinaco is a tank made of any material that is on top of your house. Whether you choose to put rainwater in it or not is your choice. An aljibe is an underground tank, usually made of brick and concrete. I've also seen big plastic tanks put in the ground and called aljibes.
There again, if you want to use it as a rainwater catch basin, it's your choice. You could use a 50 gallon barrel above ground and catch water in it from the roof. I'd call that a barrel for catching rainwater.

When the city water pressure is low, many folks will install a pump at the curb level to suck the water from the city pipes and pump it to either your aljibe or your tinaco. Think of both tinacos and aljibes as water storage units.....Well water, city water, rainwater...whatever you want. Rainwater collection is a good idea ANYWHERE you live except maybe for that desert in Chile.


futant

Jun 15, 2005, 12:27 PM

Post #10 of 11 (3797 views)

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Re: [patricio_lintz] Water well drillers. . .??

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>>A major water purification plant is on the shores of lake Chapala between Chapala and San Nicholas, on the road to Mezcala. I have been told that it supplies Guadalajara. <<

Aha!! Good lead, I think. Any chance you know an english speaker in your area who'd know more about that plant and maybe about the wells supplyying Lakeside? If the person speaks only Spanish I may be able to arrange a phone call here with a Spanish speaker on my end.

Thanks for any help,

David


Carron

Jun 17, 2005, 8:56 AM

Post #11 of 11 (3750 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Water well drillers. . .??

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In Chiapas the black rooftop tanks are called "cisternas". We pumped from the village pozo (well) which was legally on our property with an electric pump, then had gravity feed for sinks, toilets, and the shower.

Even those who had city water service in Tuxtla G. only got water once a week at a specified time, during which interval they had to fill cisternas, buckets, whatever to last until the following week. Not always a convenient way to get water! For those in-between times one could call for a privately owned water truck and they would fill the cisterna very reasonably.
 
 
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