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gfarmer

Apr 11, 2005, 9:46 PM

Post #1 of 23 (4180 views)

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Gasoline price in Mexico

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Recently I paid $2.53 for unleaded regular here in Los Angeles. How does that compare with the prices in Mexico?

gfarmer



jshrall

Apr 12, 2005, 6:55 AM

Post #2 of 23 (4130 views)

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Re: [gfarmer] Gasoline price in Mexico

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Regular unleaded (Magna) is 6.28 pesos per liter or 24.335 pesos per gallon (6.28 * 3.875). The peso to dollar exchange has been fluctuating a lot recently between 10.9 and 11.3 pesos per dollar. The price of gas here has more to do with the exchange rate on any given day than the price per liter, which has been steadily increasing. At an even 11.0 rate, gas is $2.21 USD per gallon.


johanson


Apr 12, 2005, 11:53 AM

Post #3 of 23 (4075 views)

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Re: [jshrall] Gasoline price in Mexico

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just to be a trouble maker, there are 3.785 not 3.875 liters per gallon. When I last did the computation a few days ago my exchange rate was 11.1 pesos per $. Now at I think 6.279 pesos per liter, I paid $2.14 US per gallon.

Whatever the exchange rate, what we used to think as being very expensive sure beats what one pays up North, these days.
In my home state of WA, the average cost of a gallon of gas in Seattle is $2.47 US today. The average cost of gas in Vancouver BC is $1.02 per liter or about $3.10 US per gallon.

Considering that in much of Europe a gallon goes for more than $5, things really aren't that bad here.


Marta R

Apr 12, 2005, 2:43 PM

Post #4 of 23 (4046 views)

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Re: [johanson] Gasoline price in Mexico

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The Chevron sharks near where I work (Oakland, No. California) are now charging $2.79 for a gallon of regular. I believe that the Shell sharks off 101 in Marin are charging close to $3.00, and there's a rumor that a gas station in Big Sur demands $3.52 for a gallon of regular (no competition). The cheapest gas I've seen this week is $2.59 from a Valero station.

I can only imagine that they are trying to make my transition to Mexico even more painless. That, and keep folk from griping about drilling in National Wildlife Refuges.

Marta


Camille

Apr 13, 2005, 1:40 PM

Post #5 of 23 (3945 views)

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Re: [chrisnmarta] Gasoline price in Mexico

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For years I wished Mexican gas prices were the same as in the States.......wish I had been a bit more specific, because I sure got what I wished for, just not the way I wanted it!


hoyafb95

Apr 14, 2005, 5:23 AM

Post #6 of 23 (3885 views)

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Re: [Camille] Gasoline price in Mexico

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I wish the quality of Mexican gas were more like that of the states.


D.G.

Apr 14, 2005, 6:03 AM

Post #7 of 23 (3878 views)

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Re: [hoyafb95] Gasoline price in Mexico

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You might consider making your next car a diesel. Diesel in Mexico is much higher quality than in the U.S. Plus getting about 50 miles per gallon in a station wagon, you really save.


(This post was edited by D.G. on Apr 14, 2005, 6:05 AM)


MG Rabon


Apr 14, 2005, 8:05 AM

Post #8 of 23 (3851 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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Diesel yes! AND it's cheaper too at $5.23mxp/liter.

Compórtate bien, y si no puedes, invítame!
MG Rabon


RickS


Apr 14, 2005, 9:24 AM

Post #9 of 23 (3831 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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Would you please expound on your comment that "diesel in Mexico is of a much higher quality than in the US".

Is it 'readily' available, or such that one would not have to be concerned about traveling throughout the country (I have done this with gasoline but have never had to concerned myself with the availability of diesel).

The $5.23p/l translates to about $1.80/gal! Diesel in my part of the US is now more than regular (a phenomenon) and going for about $2.40 last time I filled my truck. At that price differential it would be akin to getting a 33% boost in gas mileage. Maybe I'll tour Mexico this summer rather than the US!


D.G.

Apr 14, 2005, 9:41 AM

Post #10 of 23 (3823 views)

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Re: [RickS] Gasoline price in Mexico

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The cetane rating of the fuel is as much as 10 points higher than U.S. diesel. Cetane is a measure of energy content of the fuel. Also, because you have only one producer of fuel (Pemex), there is great uniformity in the end product. In the U.S. diesel fuel is produced by many different producers, and the quality varies a great deal.

Diesel is available at most filling stations, because busses and trucks go everywhere in Mexico. The fuel is inherently less volatile than gasoline, so in the case of an automotive crash, there is a larger measure of safety.

Diesel engines also have a much greater longevity compared to a gasoline engine. They also have tremendous torque, which is what you want to take off rapidly, or accelerate quickly. They simply are a more efficient engine.

Also, it might be said that the black smoke which belches out of older diesel engines, is not an issue with the newer ones, nor are they noisy. Plus , there are no spark plugs, and oil change intervals are 10,000 miles so there is less time involved in routine maintenance.

And don't forget the 900-1000 miles on a tankful.


Ed and Fran

Apr 14, 2005, 12:56 PM

Post #11 of 23 (3792 views)

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Re: [hoyafb95] Gasoline price in Mexico

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I wish the quality of Mexican gas were more like that of the states.


Pemex may be the only oil company in town, but all that gas you buy at their stations isn't necessarily refined down here. Pemex is way behind demand in refining capacity for unleaded gas. They export crude oil and import gasoline. I'm not sure how much of that imported gas comes from the U.S., but Pemex is co-owner of the Shell Deer Park Refinery in Deer Park, Texas.


"Entre septiembre de 2004 y enero de este año, el volumen promedio diario de importación de gasolina aumentó 295%, lo que significa que cinco de cada 10 litros de gasolina que se consumen en el país se producen en el exterior."

http://www.yucatan.com.mx/...05165&f=20050405

Also:

http://www.elsiglodedurango.com.mx/...ID/6922/y/2005/m/04/



Just for info,

E&F


johanson


Apr 14, 2005, 1:01 PM

Post #12 of 23 (3792 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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I was told that the diesel sold in Mexico produced much more smoke than the diesel sold in the US and Canada. And it was suggested that this is because the diesel is of lower quality in Mexico. I have no idea if that is true. When I filled up with magna today for $6.28 per liter, I asked the pump attendant how much diesel cost. He didn't know, but the other attendant said $5.21 per liter. Maybe it's really $5.23 and the attendant was wrong. Heck, I don't know.

If my information is correct, and I am not suggesting that it is, that equates to 5.21 times 3.785 divided by 11.1 or $1.78 or as was said above, about $1.80 per gallon.

All kinds of people have told me that the quality of gas here in Mexico is lower than the quality of gas in the US. All I know is that I buy regular (Magna) and it works great for me. I have never had any problems in either of my two cars during the 8 years I have been here.

I "AINT" no expert on the subject, maybe someone is and could enlighten us.



(This post was edited by johanson on Apr 14, 2005, 1:04 PM)


MG Rabon


Apr 14, 2005, 3:58 PM

Post #13 of 23 (3768 views)

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Re: [johanson] Gasoline price in Mexico

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I'm not the expert either, but...

The diesel in the USA is now low sulphur as mandated by the clean air act. Also many parts of the US have blended diesel during colder months where by blending D1 with D2 the get a slightly lighter fuel that has less paraffin (and lower BTUs) to help keep it from jelling. Mexican diesel is heavier, almost D3 - much more paraffin and sulphur, slightly higher BTU and cetane, but smokier and dirtier. Older diesels, large industrial, marine, and truck diesels, will probably love the stuff. New(er) diesels like the CRD Jeep, and CDI Benz, maybe not so much.

I believe Mexican magna to be a couple of octane points below that of regular unleaded in the states. My motorhome requires a 50-50 blend of Mexican fuel, or the addition of octane booster to keep from pinging on long grades. Only unleaded (oxygenated) gas in California behaved this way, with all other regular unleaded in the US (that we've tried) we are ping free. This could be a PON vs RON debate, I'm not sure, Mexican fuel is otherwise excellent.

My 20 pesos,

Compórtate bien, y si no puedes, invítame!
MG Rabon


D.G.

Apr 14, 2005, 5:21 PM

Post #14 of 23 (3745 views)

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Re: [MG Rabon] Gasoline price in Mexico

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The diesel fuel in the U.S. is not Ultra Low Sulfer fuel, which is what major car manufacturers want to meet particulate requirements for the Clean Air Act. In 2006 it will be mandated to be sold in all of the states. This, plus scrubbers will make for extremely clean diesel emissions. The diesel fuel which is sold in the U.S. runs about 40 cetane where I'm from (the Northeast) and in Mexico it is 50 cetane uniformly. That is a significant difference.

As far as large particulates are concerned, I stand by my earlier statement that modern diesel engines such as the pumpe duse engine used by Volkswagen, virtually eliminates those large particulates (the ones people describe as black smoke). This is true both North and South of the border. The small particulates are what remain, and the year 2006 will eliminate those for the most part North of the border. I do not know what Pemex will do with their formulation.

The other emissions from burning fuel such as Carbon Dioxide which is responsible for global warming is 30-40 percent less than with a gas engine, due to advantage of more miles per gallon.

Carbon monoxide, which can kill you, is part of what is put out in the exhaust of a gasoline vehicle. It is not a problem with burning diesel fuel as it produces virtually no carbon monoxide.

Natural gas and LPG powerd cars are naturally inefficient and produce more carbon dioxide than a diesel. Hence they would contribute more to global warming.

Hydrocarbons such as benzene, a carcinogen, is a problem with gasoline. There are less hydrocarbons in the exhaust of diesel vehicles compared with gasoline ones.

Nitrous Oxides are also a problem both in diesel and gasoline engines, but over the life of the engine, both types emit essentially the same quantity.

Hope this clears up some questions.


MG Rabon


Apr 14, 2005, 7:03 PM

Post #15 of 23 (3729 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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While US diesel is not yet Ultra low sulphur, the sulphur content has been lowered several times in the past 20 years. One of the major reductions took place in the late 90's and many people, myself included, had problems with injector pump seals in older diesel engines.

Mexican diesel is closer to what we'd call D3 in the states, marine diesel. Just because you might be able to buy enough diesel SOB to make it up to Fargo in the middle of the winter doesn't mean its a good idea, or that you are going to make it. ;)

But then I guess going to Fargo in the winter wouldn't be a good idea, and most of us here in Mexico are probably trying to avoid places like that anyway. LOL

Compression ignition engines such as diesels can run quite nicely on renewable fuels such as Vegie Oil, Waste Vegie Oil, and hemp oil, with little or no modification. Otherwise I believe future personal transportation devices will become more electric as hybrid gas-electric vehicles come to market, and fuel cell technology is perfected.

Compórtate bien, y si no puedes, invítame!
MG Rabon


johanson


Apr 14, 2005, 7:19 PM

Post #16 of 23 (3724 views)

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Re: [MG Rabon] Gasoline price in Mexico

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Soon I will be buying a new vehicle. I know that a gas driven vehicle will work well anywhere in North America regardless of where I buy it. But if I understood you guys correctly, if I buy a new Diesel, I'm going to have trouble if the Engine is built to US or Canadian specifications if I burn Mexican diesel fuel in it.

Did I understand this correctly?



Marta R

Apr 14, 2005, 8:44 PM

Post #17 of 23 (3704 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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"...900-1000 miles on a tankful" Wow! How does that translate in MPG?

Marta


(This post was edited by chrisnmarta on Apr 14, 2005, 8:45 PM)


wyhaines

Apr 14, 2005, 9:16 PM

Post #18 of 23 (3698 views)

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Re: [johanson] Gasoline price in Mexico

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You should have no problems. The US and Europe are both moving to low sulphur fuels for emissions reasons, but sulphur is a beneficial ingredient for the engine. The sulphur basically provides lubrication for the engine. And one of the reasons why thinner fuels are used in the US is because of colder temperatures. You do not want your fuel to gel in your injection pumps. Vehicles in Mexico can use a heavier, higher cetane fuel because there is far less risk of the sorts of temperatures which will gel fuel than in, say, Wyoming.

If I were buying a car tomorrow, I'd look very, very, very closely at the VW TDI powered vehicles. You can expect at least high 40s in mileage from either a sedan or a wagon in either a Golf of Jetta or Beetle variant, and I would imagine that VWs of any make are not hard to find parts and knowledgeable mechanics for in Mexico. And don't let the horsepower rating of the TDI powerplant fool you. Because the engine provides a lot of torque, and most of its power in the RPM bands one typically drives in, the accelerator is responsive when you need it, and being a turbo powerplant, it is not as affected with regard to power and mileage as a normally aspirated engine would be.

Along these same lines, if I were buying an inexpensive car tomorrow, I'd personally look very, very hard for an older (early-mid 80s) Mercedes 300 series car in good shape. They have an older generation of engine than the modern computer controlled diesels one finds in trucks and cars today, but they are extremely long lived, dependable, simple engines that still deliver around 25MPG, and there are still quite a few of them around that are in pretty good condition.


Kirk Haines


D.G.

Apr 15, 2005, 4:02 AM

Post #19 of 23 (3676 views)

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Re: [johanson] Gasoline price in Mexico

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You have no problems with driving a diesel in Mexico, and the mileage is about 50 mpg. I currently own, and drive a Volkswagen TDI, which is rated at 49 mpg, highway which is about what I get, depending on car load, headwind, speed, stops and starts, etc. Some people have gotten over 50 mpg.

I've driven multiple trips to the US of A with a full tank of Mexican diesel, and experienced nothing unusual. That new engine, the pumpe duse, is pretty phenonmenal (it became available in model year 2004). Something like 60 per cent of the new cars sold in Europe are diesel, due to the high cost of gasoline, and the known technology. Fuel cell cars or electric/hybrids create their own problems. Fuel cells are not available for standard passenger cars, and hydrogen delivery infrastructure does not exist. Electrics have multiple expensive heavy metal batteries and disposal is a question. They also suffer from questionable resale value as they are a new technolgy. Plus, they are being subsidized in their sale price, and what will happen to the market when the subsidy goes away? Anybody remember what happened to the solar energy industry when the government removed the subsidy for residential panels?


mrchuck


Apr 15, 2005, 5:27 AM

Post #20 of 23 (3670 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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I am getting confused here with all this talk about owning a diesel engined car, here in Mexico.

Isn't it true that Mexico will not allow importation of diesel powered motorcars?
That you will never be able to import one into the Republic?
This means, foreign plated, always?? Never a Mexican States license plate? True?

If so, this will not work for you, if you are required to drive a Mexican plated automobile.

Saludos,,,,,mc


D.G.

Apr 15, 2005, 5:49 AM

Post #21 of 23 (3658 views)

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Re: [mrchuck] Gasoline price in Mexico

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My car is not plated in Mexico. However, I saw a Mexican plated one about two weeks ago from the DF here in San Miguel de Allende. You tell me how that was possible, if it is in fact "illegal".


MG Rabon


Apr 15, 2005, 8:24 AM

Post #22 of 23 (3630 views)

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Re: [D.G.] Gasoline price in Mexico

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In Reply To
My car is not plated in Mexico. However, I saw a Mexican plated one about two weeks ago from the DF here in San Miguel de Allende. You tell me how that was possible, if it is in fact "illegal".


The one you saw was most assuredly purchased in Mexico by a Mexican citizen, not imported from the USA by a foreigner and nationalized.

On edit - Ok, it could have also been purchased in Mexico by a foreigner.

Compórtate bien, y si no puedes, invítame!
MG Rabon

(This post was edited by MG Rabon on Apr 15, 2005, 8:26 AM)


patricio_lintz


Apr 15, 2005, 5:02 PM

Post #23 of 23 (3568 views)

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Re: [MG Rabon] Gasoline price in Mexico

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In Chapala, it's 5.21 pesos per liter. My 1992 Ford diesel pickup likes Mexican diesel. No problems.
 
 
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