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anniegreen

Dec 26, 2004, 5:23 PM

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Amazon Parrot

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I recently lost an opportunity to purchase a divine Amazon. My original intent was to rescue him from his very small cage, and introduce him to my menagerie. While I waited for the vet check results, someone else bought him (he was clean and healthy incidentally). We simply fell in love with each other. Alas, I am sure Pasqual is not the only bird in the world for me! However, all things happen for a reason, as now I will take this opportunity to do further research, and not make an emotional choice.

It was recommended I visit the pet shop at Liverpool where they apparently specialize in birds. While in the States, the last place I would go for a pet was a pet shop (I will check it out). It was also recommended I wait until March when they "harvest" the parrots in Melaque. Am I understanding this process correctly? They take infant birds from their nests and sell them to people like me? As with all of my animals, I prefer to adopt a pet in need, not opt for one stolen from its mother for capital gain. On the other hand, if I did adopt a "harvested" bird, it would surely have a wonderful home, although I am reluctant to patronize this behavior.

At this point in time, I am only interested in an Amazon (of any variety). I have a great vet, and two close friends, all of whom will assist me through the educational period. I also have a wonderful environment for this new family member, and even though I won't live another 70 years, s/he will be included in my will.

I send this message to the e-mail universe at large because if you don't ask, you don't get. Maybe somebody out there knows of a situation appropriate for me.



Marlene


Dec 26, 2004, 6:38 PM

Post #2 of 12 (1798 views)

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Re: [anniegreen] Amazon Parrot

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Please find one that needs a good home now. The activity of smuggling and selling parrots is illegal and people end up in jail. The parrots belong to the Government. We have a big problem with parrot trafficking here in Sinaloa.

I was a volunteer to help save the lives of some of the smuggled babies and if you could see the appalling conditions they end up in you would never ever purchase one from this illegal source. It only encourages the trade. We are working hard here to educate people about this and have a rescue facility with volunteers that support it. I jumped through some legal hoops and was able to finally adopt and save the life of one who sadly ended up going completely blind. At least she was lucky to live through her ordeal, while probably half of them did not. The way they are treated is not only sad but disgusting. They were in complete shock, starving and thirsty, and did not make one sound when they were found in the back of a truck heading for the border. They had infections because of the filth. Their wings are been hacked to prevent them flying away.

Most of them could not be released back to the wild even after regaining their health because they were so little when stolen, they of course thought that food came in bowls served by humans. The healthy ones were taken by the military to live in their aviary. The following link will give you an idea of the program here, and just last week my friend that you see in the photo, happily released a few parrots back into the wilds. The newspaper crew was on-hand a nice story and photo layout was done. The more eduction the public receives, the better for our endangered feathery friends.

http://faunamexico.com/whoweare.htm


Jean

Dec 26, 2004, 6:47 PM

Post #3 of 12 (1794 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Amazon Parrot

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The yellow-headed Amazon parrot, native to Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico, hassuffered the greatest decline of any bird in the Americas-over 90% since the 1970s with the majority of the decline (68%) in the last ten years.

The yellow-naped Amazon, which is native to Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua is the parrot species most commonly smuggled into the U.S. Trade is having a devastating effect on wild populations. In one field study of the species in Guatemala, 100% of the chicks were taken from their nests for the illegal trade.

Nicaragua continues to export 600 birds each year legally. Nicaraguan researchers estimate that up to four times as many are captured in the wild each year to compensate for mortalities and to supply internal markets.

The Amazon parrot is an endangered species. DO NOT EVER BUY ONE.
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sfmacaws


Dec 27, 2004, 2:41 PM

Post #4 of 12 (1721 views)

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Re: [Jean] Amazon Parrot

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I know this all sounds harsh but I have to agree with Marlene and Jean. I'm very much a bird person and I own 2 rescued macaws, please don't buy a bird. You should be able to adopt a rescued bird - and give a donation to the rescue organization - but any bird you buy whether from Liverpool or on the street or in the market will mean that untold more will be snatched from their nests. It is a horrible fate for these birds, even the few who make it to a good home are scarred forever.


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




anniegreen

Dec 27, 2004, 4:21 PM

Post #5 of 12 (1703 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Amazon Parrot

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Thanks for the input. I had no idea the "harvest" was illegal here in Mexico and am certainly glad to hear to the contrary. I will continue to look for a bird to adopt, which was my original desire.

Thanks again.


anniegreen

Dec 27, 2004, 4:24 PM

Post #6 of 12 (1702 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Amazon Parrot

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Thank you too for your input. Having "lost" Pasqual has indeed resulted in an education I would otherwise not have had. When you wrote "rescue organization" did you have any one partricular organization in mind?


anniegreen

Dec 27, 2004, 4:32 PM

Post #7 of 12 (1699 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Amazon Parrot

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What a horrible story. I am so glad you filled me in on these atrocities. I have a lead on a bird someone wants to give away because she has so many. Believe me, I will drill her as to where she got them to begin with before making a decision. I believe her heart is in the right place but after reading these responses to my email will definitely only adopt a rescue.

Thanks so much for taking the time to write me and keep me in mind should you find someone needing a mom. Have wheels, will travel.

Good luck with your volunteer work.


Marlene


Dec 27, 2004, 5:38 PM

Post #8 of 12 (1683 views)

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Re: [anniegreen] Amazon Parrot

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Ah Annie, if only everyone understood like you - it would make such a difference. Do not pay someone for a parrot.

As Jonna says no matter what, they will have individual scars, so be prepared. My Canadian parrot was imported legally from the Amazon via a quarantine station in Florida, however has never forgotten his ordeal. We "rescued" him from a pet store. He is now 25 years old, still hates men and would sooner rip body parts off them than look at them. I, on the other hand get kisses and cuddles. Parrots are very smart and I believe they never forget the kidnapping horror.


sfmacaws


Dec 27, 2004, 9:57 PM

Post #9 of 12 (1652 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Amazon Parrot

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We had a Severe Macaw (it's one of the 'mini' breeds) that had been wild caught. She had belonged to 2 women for untold years until they both died in their 70's. We found her at a pet shop where she was either huddled in a corner or attacking whoever came near the cage. The guy who owned the store was trying to find her a home for the women's heirs and had said he would 'tame' her. He had given up and Mimi started going in and just sitting with her. Eventually he let us buy her for less than the cost of her cage (and we got that too) because he realized he couldn't sell her or tame her.

It took Mimi about 6 months but Gertie (she was named after Gertrude Stein - the name came with her) was as loving as any bird I've seen. Only with Mimi however, she tolerated me if necessary but took occasional chunks out of me just so I didn't forget that I was NOT her person. She never liked a single male human that we saw, our male roommate was in terror of her. She would fly to the floor and go after his toes in the morning, we all kind of got a kick out of the dance he would do.

We had been told that she was about 17 years old but our avian vet said that from the extent of her cataracts and her arthritis she thought she was over 50 years old. We also discovered during a blood test that Gertrude was really a male. It was too late for us to change pronouns so we decided she was a birdy transexual.

Gertie would lay upside down in Mimi's arms and gurgle and coo while Mimi stroked her face and under her wings. It was the most amazing transformation, she gained weight and her feathers shone. She had seizures though and we spent a lot of time and money trying to control them for over 5 years. She died this past March, from a huge seizure. In the necropsy, the vet stated that he believed her to be over 70 years old!

We were happy that she had such a happy last few years and there were probably other times in her long life that were happy as well. The bad times must have been very, very bad though to leave her the way she was. She feared and hated most humans on sight, it took a lot of patience and bloody fingers for her to learn to trust Mimi. She had night terrors frequently, screaming and fighting alone in her cage until Mimi could get to her and soothe her. With us, she lived with 2 full size macaws and hated them on sight as well. She grew to like the male, she liked to be in the same room he was but they never got close to each other. She seemed soothed by his presence and would take off across the floor to find him if she heard him in another room.

Through Gertie we learned a lot about wild caught birds. They usually hate men because it is men who catch them and stuff them in bags. While they are waiting to be sold or smuggled it is the women who feed them and are kind to them. Usually men again stuff them in sacks or worse and transport them across the border for sale. Most don't survive the trip and those that do are physically injured and psychologically scarred. These birds are very smart, about the level of 2 year old human child, and the terror stays with them. They have very long memories, our macaws remember everyone they have ever met, no matter how long it has been since they saw them. We don't know if Gertie's seizures and night terrors were related to her capture but I believe they were.

I know this is a long story but partly it is a tribute to such a brave bird that changed our lives. If you'd like to see some pictures of Gertie, they are at http://www.baddog.com/gertie/

In her memory, I can never keep quiet about people purchasing wild caught birds.


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




Marlene


Dec 27, 2004, 11:12 PM

Post #10 of 12 (1648 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Amazon Parrot

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Thank you Jonna for relating that touching story. I have heard that parrots are actually closer to the level of the 4 year old's intelligence, and you are right, they never forget their ordeals or their "loving" owners that have abandoned them later on when they change their minds about parrot ownership. (Not an easy job, so thing well before you acquire one is the rule)..


Rolly


Dec 28, 2004, 7:15 AM

Post #11 of 12 (1629 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Amazon Parrot

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I am not a bird person at all, but I have found these stories very intersting. Thank you all for telling about your birds.

Rolly Pirate


sfmacaws


Dec 28, 2004, 1:19 PM

Post #12 of 12 (1598 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Amazon Parrot

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Yes, I think you are right Marlene, they are said to have the intelligence of a 4 or 5 year old. Where I got the 2 year old is our common joke that living with them is like living with a house full of large-lunged 2 year olds. They have the emotional needs of a young willful child and often their first response to anything new is a resounding "NO!". In fact, both our birds have "Stop it!" and "Shut up!" in their vocabulary and use them appropriately... I always deny knowing how they learned that <g> One of them will scream about something and the other one will yell "shut up", it's never dull.

Thanks, Rolly for the positive response.


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán


 
 
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