Mexico Connect
Forums  > General > General Forum
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


toocrazy

Aug 8, 2004, 9:41 AM

Post #1 of 39 (2958 views)

Shortcut

    

Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Hola,

I was reading on the forum someone’s opinion about the attitude of the throwaway culture of the USA and the Mexican approach of lets see if we can fix it before we buy new. That got me thinking of what household items to bring down to Mexico in the move. Example, would it be better to purchase a new washer& dyer in Mexico rather than haul our current appliances which are several years old? What are the economic experiences and costs to folks moving to Mexico? Remembering this is retirement and the now limited income stream.



Rolly


Aug 8, 2004, 10:01 AM

Post #2 of 39 (2949 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [toocrazy] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
A washer will cost a bit more in Mexico that in the States, and you will have fewer models to choose from. So if you are planning to get a menaje de casa to move your furniture, bring the washer; but don't get a menaje just for the washer. As for the drier -- the cost of operation (gas or electric) makes it a poor investment. I would say forget the drier. Nearly everyone uses a pasive solar drier -- AKA clothes line.

Rolly Pirate


Uncle Jack


Aug 8, 2004, 10:22 AM

Post #3 of 39 (2944 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Rolly] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Another consideration......how old are your appliances? New washers, dryers, refrigerators are much more energy efficient and electricity costs money down here. Also Mexican appliances are built to withstand greater variations in current fluctuations which are common.

uj


toocrazy

Aug 8, 2004, 11:12 AM

Post #4 of 39 (2932 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Uncle Jack] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Those are very good points, the appliances are all about 10 years old, ASKO (Swedish) which is most likely not a band stocked in Mexico but very good products. Same with the car, Subrau not big in Mexico!


johanson


Aug 8, 2004, 12:47 PM

Post #5 of 39 (2920 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Uncle Jack] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Good point Uncle Jack. The appliances that are built in Mexico usually hold up much better to conditions in Mexico than those purchased in the states for the states.


NEOhio

Aug 8, 2004, 1:14 PM

Post #6 of 39 (2914 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [johanson] Mexico Moving practices

  |
Since there is a Sears there, does it sell its Kenmore brand appliances? do they call it something else? Do you know of a web site for Mexican located Sears? Thanks.


Don


Aug 8, 2004, 1:54 PM

Post #7 of 39 (2904 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [NEOhio] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Many years ago we bought a Kenmore washer and gas dryer from Sears in Guadalajara. They were imported and made in the U.S. We have had no major problems with them.
Also, there are some stores down here in our area that sell Whirlpool appliances. I believe they are made by Kenmore, here in Mexico


NEOhio

Aug 8, 2004, 3:04 PM

Post #8 of 39 (2890 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Don] Mexico Moving practices

  |
Thanks, that's good to know. I'll familiarize myself with those brands and be better able to choose when we get there. Thanks.

I am sure I will be able to find anything I want in Mexico, after all it is not the end of the world.


Georgia


Aug 8, 2004, 3:14 PM

Post #9 of 39 (2888 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [NEOhio] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Many, many (like 35) years ago, I could get Kenmore brand appliances and the like in the Sears in Mexico, DF. I was surprised this year when I went to the Sears in Guadalajara and they were not carrying the Kenmore brand, but other brands. It may have been that they just didn't have any (I've only gone there once), and that other forum participants could comment.


Cynthia7

Aug 8, 2004, 4:06 PM

Post #10 of 39 (2880 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Georgia] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
there are plenty of choices for appliances in Mexico. Sears, Cosco, Sam's, Electra, Carrefours, Walmart , Liverpool etc. both Mexican made and imports. Bring linens, comfortable sofas and chairs, good pots and pans. Things that are expensive here or not available. Many times things that are so beautiful in the US look different here. I bought a beautiful turquoise squash blossom necklace in Arizona that looked different when I got it to the sunny southern state where I lived.


nlnic

Aug 8, 2004, 5:10 PM

Post #11 of 39 (2868 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Georgia] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Sears here in the States now sells all different brands as well as Kenmore. Since I also sell appliances, it is interesting (or maybe not) to note here that Kenmore doesn't make anything anymore. The Kenmore appliances are all made by other manufacturers and labeled Kenmore. Refrigerators are usually Amana, washers can be Whirlpool or Maytag, etc. Sears sells them and in some areas services them, where there is a service center in the vicinity.
Just more info....
Nancy N
Con mi corazon en Mexico!


Bubba

Aug 8, 2004, 5:18 PM

Post #12 of 39 (2863 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Cynthia7] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
So far we have bought a Mexican made Mabe refrigerator and clothes washer in Chapala, Jalisco and a Whirlpool dishwasher from Tio Sam's in Guadalajara. I believe Mabe is a subsidiary of General Electric but is a Mexican company. All are fine and priced right. We also got a good deal on three Hunter Douglas top-of-the-line ceiling fans in Guadalajara. If there is difference in pricing, it is not significant except to Pete Johanson. The rumor is that Pete once dropped a quarter in Northern Arizona and thus we have the Grand Canyon.

The one really bad experience we had here is when we bought a new and very expensive Sony 37" TV from the Vallarta WalMart in Guadalajara. They delivered the monster without the warranty card and, when the thing broke down within a month, the following happened:

Tha part that was defective was not in stock anywhere in Mexico because there was the assumption at Sony in Mexico that these parts are never faulty. This was a new import so why import and inventory a bunch of parts that consumers rarely need. It took six months for Sony to get us a replacement part from Japan and repair the TV.

When we told WalMart that the new and very expensive TV had broken down within 60 days of purchase and asked that they exchange it for a new one, they refused. They also refused to acknowledge that they were responsible for the fact that the independent delivery service they use forgot to unload the warranty which they took away with the box in which the TV came. This, even though we had proof of purchase and delivery.

Sony refused to honor the warranty because the warranty cards are computerized and warranty work cannot be performed without that specific document. Since they acknowledged that this was a brand new TV set and said they felt sorry for me, they put in a new part for 1/2 price or about the equivalent of $125USD (the TV cost about $1,300USD).

WalMart on Vallarta and Sony were totally unresponsive to my plight. It took five months of searching all over Mexico before Sony would admit that this part did not even exist in the country and had to be ordered from Japan. I would never buy any mechanical contrivance with a retail value of more that $50 Pesos from either of those companies again.

And, here is the real lesson. Make damn sure you have your warranty documents if you buy an appliance of any kind at WalMart. WalMart Mexico ain't WalMart in Salina, Kansas.


Carol Schmidt


Aug 8, 2004, 5:24 PM

Post #13 of 39 (2860 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [toocrazy] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
We bought all new Mabe brand appliances once we got here--our casa was rented furnished but we replaced everything over the past two years. The old refrigerator had to be defrosted every three days, the stove shot flames out the sides when you dared light a burner, with a match, the hot water heater was blackened with soot, etc.

Mabe is made near San Miguel in Queretaro and I think it is connected with General Electric. Anyway, Mabe has a whole range of refrigerators, for example, from a tiny apartment sized one for maybe $150 US all the way up to a two-door stainless steel beauty for $2000 US. Everybody we talked to ahead of time said Mabe was a good brand here, and that's what we went for. What we got was in the middle, and it cost a little bit more than in the States.

Carol Schmidt


Papirex


Aug 8, 2004, 5:37 PM

Post #14 of 39 (2857 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [NEOhio] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
http://www.sears.com.mx/r1/index.asp Here is the link for sears in Mexico.

Be aware that Sears in Mexico is not owned by Sears in The U.S. They are affiliated, but they are two separate companies. You can use your U.S. Sears credit card in the stores here, but for some reason it takes a phone call to Sears in The U.S. to get an approval for a credit purchase. They can’t do it with a computer here in Cuernavaca. They only have one phone in the store here with the capability to do it. It usually takes about an hour to get an approval. That may differ in different cities in Mexico.

They don’t always have a full line of Kenmore appliances in stock, in fact they usually don’t have any. We did buy a Kenmore brand freezer there three years ago. We have also bought furniture from Sears twice, and a Maytag brand portable dishwasher there. We used our Sears credit cards each time. It is easier for us to use the credit card and pay the balance off over the Internet than it is to go to an ATM several days in a row to get enough cash for a big purchase. We have a Mexican bank account, but it can be a real hassle getting many businesses to accept a personal check, unless they know you very well.

I used to work for Sears many years ago, and Whirlpool used to manufacture all Kenmore branded appliances. I don’t think that is the case anymore. I used to always buy Kenmore brand appliances because Sears has such a great service, and parts division. You can buy a service manual for any appliance they sell, and buy, or order any part for them. I have never paid anyone to repair any big appliance. That may need to change here in Mexico.

I can give three pieces of advice when shopping for appliances in Mexico: 1. Forget brand loyalty. 2. Forget brand loyalty. 3. Forget brand loyalty. If the first three methods don’t work for you, forget brand loyalty and go shopping. Decide what features you must have in an appliance, and then shop on price, and price alone.

I wouldn’t worry about the voltage fluctuations here. In spite of what other posters have said, all electrical appliances manufactured anywhere have a tolerance for voltage fluctuations. It is usually listed on a metal tag, a sticker, or sometimes on the power cord. It usually says something like “Input 115-130 volts AC”, that tag may vary somewhat in the voltages listed. We also have a washer and dryer, White-Westinghouse brand, and a Admiral brand refrigerator. We bought all our major appliances in Mexico. We have nothing against Mexican branded stuff, but we were buying on price, and price alone. We have had good service with all our appliances, and no problems with the electrical voltages here.

I wouldn’t bring down an electric clothes dryer. Electricity is very expensive down here, and few houses in Mexico have 230 volt electrical service in them. You can usually have a 230 volt line ran to your house, but not always. In some areas 230 volt service is not available, and never will be.

Appliances do cost more in Mexico than they do in The U.S., but if you shop, shop, shop, (with no brand loyalty) you can narrow that gap. If you are in a hurry, you will most likely pay the higher price.

Rex






"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo

(This post was edited by RexC on Aug 8, 2004, 5:52 PM)


johanson


Aug 8, 2004, 6:10 PM

Post #15 of 39 (2842 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [RexC] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Rex wrote that in some neighborhoods 230 is not available and never will be. Let me tell you about an area like that. It's my neighborhood in Ajijic. Although I have three legs and usually each leg has a voltage of 110 to 127, you don't get double that when you hook up to two hot leads.

We have 3 phase electricity. And as I recollect when you are 120 not 180 degrees out of phase, you get about 87% of what you would get if you were 180 degrees out of phase.

Oh, several years ago, my neighborhood often had 102 to 105 volts per leg during periods of high use. My 220-240 motors would not function of course (105 volts times 2 times 87%= 182 volts) Three phase motors are very expensive. So all of my electric motors now run on 110-120 volt circuits


Cynthia7

Aug 8, 2004, 6:45 PM

Post #16 of 39 (2831 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [johanson] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
We have a very good appliance store in San Miguel de Allende by the name of Mosqueta located at Correo 34. They can get almost anything you see other places and their prices are competitive. They have a large warehouse and periodically have a sale. If you are in the area check them out. We moved here 18 years ago and at that time when you bought an appliance it was yours and absolutely no recourse. They were the first store that stood behind what they sold. I cooked for years on a gas grate because the stoves were usually a bunch of junk. I bought a Hotpoint made in Mexico for US - made to US specs. Great stove- broiler(which lots of Mexican stoves don't have), electric pilot, digital timer, oven thermostat and oven light, simmer setting, comal, etc. It cost less than $400.00 D. about 4 years ago. A real buy.


Papirex


Aug 8, 2004, 7:01 PM

Post #17 of 39 (2828 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [johanson] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Pete, I have to agree with you on your choice of voltages for electric motors. 3 phase is just too damn problematic anywhere. I worked in the construction industry most of my life. I most loved working in the field with the tools, but I held several management positions over the years too.

At one time I was the purchasing agent for a mechanical contractor. Whenever we were mobilizing for a big job there was always new equipment to buy. Those salesmen would go nuts when they were trying to sell me things like air compressors with a 3 phase motor. I would tell them I won’t buy anything 3 phase.

Temporary electric service to a construction site is never too reliable. It is just too problematic to maintain and protect 3 phase motors under field conditions. You lose one leg and you have big troubles. You are right that those motors are very expensive to replace too.

I think your numbers are right, but I can’t verify them anymore. When I retired, I gave all my technical manuals, code books, etc. to the young guys I worked with. I had a bookshelf full of them. I also shredded all the certificates I had earned over the years, and my resume. I may have a copy of my resume on a floppy somewhere though.

Some of the guys I gave the manuals to asked me if maybe I should keep some of them in case I ever needed them. My wife said the same thing when she saw me shredding the certificates, etc. I told them all the same thing: “If you ever see me with a tool in my hand again, you will know I am working on my own stuff.”

Rex
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo


ET

Aug 8, 2004, 7:34 PM

Post #18 of 39 (2817 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Bubba] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply

Quote
"Bubba" writes:
.... I believe Mabe is a subsidiary of General Electric but is a Mexican company.....


Mabe is a Mexican company, founded in 1947. In the mid-80's it became a joint venture with the Mexican owners entering into a partnership with General Electric in a 52% (Mabe)/48% (GE) ownership split. The joint venture, which remains under Mexican direction and management, gave Mabe access to capital to beef up research and development and purchase product lines from a number of their Mexican competitors giving them significant market share initially in Mexico and now in other parts of Central and South America. GE in exchange got access to lower cost production capabilities as well as already-developed design and production capabilities in areas where they had no experience (specifically gas ranges - there's a legendary story about how GE, in the early 80's conducted consumer brand recognition studies and found that 25% of the respondents said they were considering purchasing GE gas ranges when GE didn't even market gas ranges). The interaction between the management of the two companies is studied as a success story in transnational/transcultural corporate interactions, in contrast to the straight takeovers or foreign invasions which are more often the case.


N2Futur

Aug 9, 2004, 10:45 AM

Post #19 of 39 (2741 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [toocrazy] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
We bought a Kenmore stack washer w/gas dryer at Sears in Guadalajara in March for our rental. About $200 more there than it would have cost here in US.
We too have the ASKO washer/dryer back home and I would hate having to give them up. For those of you unfamiliar with european washers - there is only a cold water inlet, the machine has an internal heater and can be programmed to any temperature up to boiling point.
Getting parts would be a problem. We had to replace some brushes on the washer and had no problems getting the parts here in Colorado.

Elke
___________________________
"When choosing between two evils, I always like to pick the one I never tried before." - Mae West


ET

Aug 9, 2004, 11:36 AM

Post #20 of 39 (2736 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [N2Futur] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply

Quote
"N2Future" writes:
....We too have the ASKO washer/dryer back home and I would hate having to give them up. For those of you unfamiliar with european washers - there is only a cold water inlet, the machine has an internal heater and can be programmed to any temperature up to boiling point.....


The problem would be that at least the ASKO washers and dryers that I looked at in the past in the US require 220 volt single-phase service to operate (both heating water and running drying elements sucks up a lot of juice). Other posters have indicated that in Mexico such service may be problematic, both in whether you can actually get such service where you live, and with the quality of service if it is available.

If such service is available you might also want to run the numbers to figure out whether the cost of operating the units makes it worthwhile, considering the elevated cost of electricity. I know that in the US, considering the difference in what I pay for gas v. what I would pay for electricity made the ASKO units and others of their type a questionable proposition, compared to a less elegant conventional water saving front-load washer and gas dryer, particularly when I factored in the much higher up-front cost for the ASKO units and what I'd have to pay for running 220 service to my laundry room.


N2Futur

Aug 9, 2004, 12:22 PM

Post #21 of 39 (2726 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [ET] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
.... and give up having brilliant WHITE vs. dingy white laundry as evidenced by using american-style washers? Been there, done that and being German - didn't like it.....I remember my grandmother boiling all the white stuff in a coalfired vat, so having a washer that washes at boiling temps is something that's a must have for this German!

There are some conveniences I am not willing to give up and that is definitely one of them and BTW - we are able to afford paying the additional cost for the extra electricty it will take, even when we're retired. Our laundry room was already wired for 220V here and the area where we bought our house in Mexico does offer 220V which also should pose no problem.

We are bringing ALL of our "toys" and that's one of 'em.....

Elke
___________________________
"When choosing between two evils, I always like to pick the one I never tried before." - Mae West


Adrian

Aug 9, 2004, 4:12 PM

Post #22 of 39 (2682 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [RexC] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply

In Reply To
You can usually have a 230 volt line ran to your house, but not always. In some areas 230 volt service is not available, and never will be.


How do you figure this, Rex? Inside CFE information? Seeing as US & Mexican 220V is achieved by dint of having an additional phase of 110V from the power-pole outside, how can it not be available in all areas, when all areas have 3 phase distribution?

Adrian


toocrazy

Aug 9, 2004, 4:27 PM

Post #23 of 39 (2679 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [N2Futur] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Elke, we would agree with you, the ASKO products would be hard to give up for we never have had a problem with either unit. ET’s points on the electrical service requirements are valid points and apparently in some parts of Mexico even in the more heavily populated areas 220 volt is not available. That is true here in the States also but we assumed it was available where we purchased and now after reading the posts and checking we known it is…..

The great thing about all the posts and the sounding board is they mention something that gets you thinking about things you missed. Elke, mentioned that parts would be a problem but that seems to be the case no matter what brand or item one is talking about i.e. cars, TVs, CD players. Nobody stocks parts anymore, it is to costly so if something falls apart, they determine what broke and order it and you wait so in that light we do have an international community.

ET, you mentioned costs although luckily we don’t have the front-end costs to worry about at this point, operating cost should be the same or maybe less than other traditions brands but running the numbers is a good idea. To replace them now we would need to factor in the front-end costs into the equation.

We thank you all for the guide in thoughts about items to bring, costs involved and services available.


jerezano

Aug 9, 2004, 5:13 PM

Post #24 of 39 (2664 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [toocrazy] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Hello,

One thing not mentioned so far is bed sizes. Mexican beds and mattresses differ from those in the USA so fitted sheets can be a problem, if you bring your own beds.

Here are the sizes:
Amer: Crib 28x52" Mex: I don't know.
Amer: Twin 39x75" Mex: Ditto
Amer: Twin (extra-Long) 39x80" Mex: not available
Amer: Full 54x75" Mex: Same
Amer: Queen 60x80" Mex 59"x78"
Amer: King 78x80" Mex 75 x78"
Amer: California King 72x84" Mex, not available.

This means with outsize beds that you either buy American made sheets or need to make adjustments. Adios. Jerezano.


johanson


Aug 9, 2004, 5:50 PM

Post #25 of 39 (2657 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Adrian] Mexico Moving practices

  | Private Reply
Just because you have two 110 volt lines doesn't mean you are going to get 220. It depends how far out of phase the first line is with the other. If its 180 degrees out then yes you will get 220. If it is the type of 3 phase I have in my residential neighborhood in Ajijic each phase is 120 degrees out of phase with the other two. and the maximum voltage difference I would have when putting my voltage meter on any two hot leads would not be 220 but 191 volts

Or if each phase were 120 volts I would not get 240 but 208+ volts.

My figures might be off a little.The last time I looked at any trig tables was probably in High School But if I recollect at 120 degrees you have 87% correction factor

I am sure there is someone out there with a little more experience than I, who could explain the above better than I did
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4