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Chumley

Aug 4, 2004, 2:14 PM

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Water Pressure Systems

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In particular, the solid tank that holds the water under pressure. We installed this into our home seven years ago and now my trusted, and I mean that, plumber has told me that the internal diaphram has a tear or hole, and there is no air pressure left in the tank. That is the reason our pump has been working overtime. My question is simply this: is it common for that part of a pressure system to fail in that short of a time? Since the tank is sealed, there is no way it can be repaired on the location, but must be replaced to the tune of $400.00 US. Any others have this experience?



Esteban

Aug 4, 2004, 3:04 PM

Post #2 of 6 (7006 views)

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Re: [Chumley] Water Pressure Systems

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7 years is probably pretty good service out of a tank when you consider it cost only 400 bucks. However, it is not that unusual for a tank to last longer. The best tank on the market is a Well-X-Trol. I worked with them for many years. I've also seen the diaphram break in a year. I believe the guarantee is for one year and that's the best tank on the market. Just remember that paying the extra money for a good pressure tank will help insure that the rest of the system will not fail. I might also add that once the diaphram breaks, the tanks are garbage...I've never heard of anyone who repairs them. Usually what happens is that they develop a pinhole leak and the upper portion of the tank where the air is located, fills with water. You have to drill holes in the tank to get the water out so that you can move the tank.


(This post was edited by Esteban on Aug 4, 2004, 3:06 PM)


johanson


Aug 5, 2004, 1:30 PM

Post #3 of 6 (6976 views)

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Re: [Esteban] Water Pressure Systems

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I've had a diaphragm (Spelling?) in a pressure system in the states now for 12 years without a failure. And the one I have in Ajijic is in a used house that I bought 8 years ago and it hasn't broken.

With NO DEGREE of expertise other than what is stated above, I don't think it is normal for one to break so early in it's life



Esteban

Aug 5, 2004, 2:37 PM

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Re: [johanson] Water Pressure Systems

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Having worked with rural water systems for MANY years, I can tell you that just like any other piece of machinery, pressure tanks fail for various reasons. We don't know the make of the tank nor do we know any other particulars as to why the tank failed. Personally, I don't know for sure if the diaphragm was ruined unless I was was the one checking it. However, the best tanks, on occasion, do fail sooner than they should.


Chumley

Aug 6, 2004, 5:46 AM

Post #5 of 6 (6944 views)

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Re: [Esteban] Water Pressure Systems

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Your description of the cause of failure was exactly what my trusted plumber told me, and although I don't know the brand of my tank, I'll be checking it out before we buy the replacement, and certainly will consider the Well-X-Trol you recommended if our current one is not one. Nevertheless, as you say, sooner or later mechanical devices fail, especially ones subject to constant use 24/7. I was just curious if others who have such a system have had to replace it in what I would consider to be a situation of sooner rather than later. Thanks for your input.


Esteban

Aug 6, 2004, 8:47 AM

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Re: [Chumley] Water Pressure Systems

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Like I mentioned before, I worked in this field for MANY years and have seen it all! If your pump is cycling quickly ie off and on off and on at a rapid pace, your tank is probably the culprit. The tank should be almost empty of water because above the diaphram there is air. The diaphram separates the air from the water. Just in case you are being scammed, tap the tank and see if in fact the tank feels full. If not, take an air guage and check the air valve on top. It should read 2 lbs less than your cut-in pressure. In Mexico, the usual cut in pressure is 20 lbs but with newer places they are jacking it up to 30lbs per sq. inch. The high end is 20 lbs/per sq. inch higher than the low end. Like I said, I'd have to check it to know if your plumber knows for sure. It could also be a faulty pressure switch. If the cut in pressure is NOT at least 18 lbs per sq. inch, take a bicycle pump or an electric air pump and put that amount of air into the top of the tank. All this info is based on the fact you actually do have a diaphram tank. Good luck.
 
 
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