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Carron

May 27, 2004, 11:04 AM

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Feeding the Mascotas

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Do some of us old timers/dog/cat/assorted pet lovers want to contribute recipes and other info about life with our mascotas in Mexico? Sometimes I think our mascotas eat better than (or at least the same as) we do! Then again, fresh meat is more affordable in Mexico. Also veterinary care.


(This post was edited by jennifer rose on May 27, 2004, 11:11 AM)



Rolly


May 27, 2004, 11:27 AM

Post #2 of 15 (1956 views)

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Re: [Carron] Feeding the Mascotas

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My dogs love the chicken soup I make for them using bones, skin and other parts I'm not interested in. I simmer the stuff for 24 hours in a crock pot to be sure the bones are soft, and let it sit for a couple of days to ripen the way they like it best.

I used to do it in a large pan on the stove top until the day I forgot to turn the flame down low before I left for work back in the old country. When I got home the whole mess had been cremated and the house was saturated in greasy smoke. Before that I had never fully understood the concept of smoke damage. I hired a guy to clean the house; it took 11 days. I bought a crock pot; no more fires.

Rolly Pirate


Carol Schmidt


May 27, 2004, 12:13 PM

Post #3 of 15 (1950 views)

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Re: [Carron] Feeding the Mascotas

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Right now there is a shortage of canned dog food in San Miguel, and probably much of the world, because of the mad cow export rules on beef. The vets still have the expensive stuff in cans like Science Diet, but the grocery store shelves are mostly out of canned dog food.

Our small dog has been living on Mother Hubbard biscuits which we got in the States, and several friends have brought down bags of it when they've come here, but she's about out, and I hate to think of the hassle in changing her to anything else.

Canned dog food alone is not supposed to be good for dogs because their teeth need the cleansing from hard food, and she doesn't like most kinds anyway.

She loves our new kitten's canned food mixed with milk, however, when she slips past us to get at it first before we can close the door on the kitten during her feeding. Maybe we'll try mixing some canned cat food with dry dog food and see if she'll eat that. Dogs can live on cat food, though it has too much protein and other ingredients, but cats can't live on dog food because they need higher protein levels.

Yes, our dog is spoiled, and would prefer people food, but that's not good for her either. Sometimes we've cooked chicken and rice for her, but that's a hassle.

We feed our two adult indoor cats and about 20 outdoor cats Whiskas in the 20K bags, or the Costco brand if it's cheaper and we get to Celaya or Queretaro. Our neighbors share in the spaying and feeding of the outdoor cats. We're known as soft touches--our maid found a tiny kitten with a crushed front leg and we've spent 1000 pesos so far on the kitten's leg amputation, healing and shots.

My art teacher, who is on a very small pension and salary, spends 200 pesos a week for triga to feed the pigeons who come to the classroom patio in Belles Artes, and another 200 pesos a week for fresh chicken and beef that she (or rather her maid) cooks for her dog.

The pet trainer columnist in Atencion recommends raw bones for dogs as the healthiest thing for them, but I don't want greasy, smelly raw bones on my rug and furniture.

Carol Schmidt


jennifer rose

May 27, 2004, 1:16 PM

Post #4 of 15 (1940 views)

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Re: [Carol Schmidt] Feeding the Mascotas

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I spend more time cooking for my Doberboys than I do for myself. When I discovered the old one required a low-purine diet, and the specialty dog food was just too costly – especially when the younger wanted to eat the same thing – I had to start cooking for them. And since both weigh about about sixty kilos, there was no way I could afford to feed them without mortgaging the house.

Researching the diet on the Internet and consulting with an animal nutritionist led me to cooking their food. Broken rice, some chicken (a single chicken stretches for about ten days for the two dogs), a ton of carrots, a small amount of garlic, sometimes tomatoes, squash or chayote, and a handful of green beans or Swiss chard becomes their paella, cooked up in batches every two or three days. Actually, it doesn’t take very long to cook up the Dog Rice, because it’s become as routine as making coffee. Sometimes a little brewer’s yeast, wheat germ, nonfat dry milk or flaxseed is added to the mixture. The younger one favors tortillas. About once a month, their repast consists of scrambled eggs and cheese (Oaxaca or panela). They receive about two cups of dry Kirkland Lamb and Rice or Performance dry each morning.

I thought I’d economize by putting hot dogs in their Dog Rice instead of the more costly chicken, but they showed their gratitude by flipping their dishes across the patio. Since then, my economy moves have been only to ask for a doggy bag when I see someone leaving meat scraps behind at a restaurant….and avocados destined for the dumpster.

After too many Dobermans suffering broken teeth, and the resultant veterinary bills from extractions, from chewing too vigorously on bones, I’ve learned to feed them Kirkland dog biscuits or homemade dog treats and whole carrots instead. We go through at least six kilos of carrots each week.

Dog biscuits are incredibly easy to make and freeze. Online a huge number of recipes can be found.

And then there are the avocados. I had to cut down an avocado tree in the yard, just because the dogs brought too many of the huesos into the house, hiding them strategically under the sofa cushions. (It wasn’t a very good avocado tree anyway.) They’re rabid about avocados, and they can’t get their fill of them. Actually, they prefer them slightly mushy.

The change in their health has been remarkable since they’ve started eating a more healthful diet. And the savings over a diet solely comprised of commercial dog food has been significant. Given the dubious quality of the ingredients, e.g. meat byproducts, in commercial dog food, I’m happier knowing that they’re receiving well-balanced rations.


Carol Schmidt


May 28, 2004, 10:33 AM

Post #5 of 15 (1913 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Feeding the Mascotas

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Thanks for the info, Rolly and Jennifer. Guess I hit Google to find biscuit and stew recipes for a small old dog.

Carol Schmidt


Carron

May 29, 2004, 1:51 PM

Post #6 of 15 (1889 views)

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Re: [Carol Schmidt] Feeding the Mascotas

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I feed my dogs (a Pomeranian and a momma Rat Terrier with 4 fat puppies) a modified BARF diet, that being Bones And Raw Food. Sample menus and nutritional facts are available on line, probably via a Google search. Each morning they get small meaty bones (the spine bones of pork) Soriana sells for making pozole. The bones entertain them while I drink coffee and even our cat demands his share. A two day supply costs about 8 pesos. For the rest of the day they have access to a large bowl of dry kibbles, usually Pedigree since that is the ubiquitous brand sold every where. Supplemented further with table scraps and other odds and ends plus vitamin tablets.

We once had a german shepherd who went wild for dried banana chips. My oldest daughter, who then worked at a veterinary clinic in Florida while she studied to be a nurse, said her boss advocated that any fruit or vegetable a pet ate was certain to be good for it. Avocados get a definite thumbs up from my Mexican menagerie.


Marlene


May 29, 2004, 4:10 PM

Post #7 of 15 (1881 views)

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Re: [Carron] Feeding the Mascotas

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Avocados are my favorite too. One of my friends has a tree with HUGE avocados on it, but avocados are said to be very toxic to parrots. I find this very interesting since parrots in the wild would have easy access to them. Maybe they instinctively know what is good for them and what isn't. ?? As a long time Amazon parrot owner I would hate to take a chance though. I helped with nursing a truck load of smuggled parrot babies headed north for the border, back to health here in Mazatlàn and I learned a lot about parrot nutrition (after already owning an amazon in Canada for many years, it was amazing what I didn't know - poor guy with his little cast iron stomach) I adopted one of the babies here after she went blind from infection contracted in her smuggling ordeal. She has it doubly hard because she can't see what I am feeding her, and doesn't trust anything until she has a little taste, something she does reluctantly unless it smells familiar. It is really hard to get her to try new things and I do worry about her getting proper nutrition. The colorful food that attracts most parrots doesn't interest her at all since she has absolutely zero sight. She appears to love Mexican food so does get her Vitamin T's like the rest of us, but hates fruit which is a concern. That isn't natural. I am not sure what to do about that so if anyone has any ideas.. My friends look at her quizzically when she is chomping away on chicken bones and is beak down in chicken molé, which she loves. (This is still Mexican Kitchen talk, right Mods?)


sfmacaws


May 30, 2004, 12:06 AM

Post #8 of 15 (1867 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Feeding the Mascotas

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We have macaws (that's one of them, Mike, in the picture peeking out from behind a curtain) and were told by the avian vet that it is something in the skin or seed of the avocado (I forget which) that is toxic to birds. Supposedly if you were absolutely positive that it was only pulp it wouldn't hurt them, I wouldn't try it. In the wild, macaws eat clay from riverbanks and it is thought that this detoxifies some of the stuff they eat. Perhaps Amazons do this too? Be careful with the mole, we were also told that chocolate is toxic to our birds.

To get her to eat fruit, try mashing some with a little peanut butter in it or mixing fresh fruit in yogurt. Our birds love yogurt and it's good for their crop, keeps the good bacteria going. Once she gets used to the taste you can cut way back on the yogurt until she likes the fruit. Ours also eat chicken, it's so odd to see them sitting on their perch waving a chicken leg around in their foot. I'm sure one of these days they will learn to say "bloody cannibal" cuz they hear it alot.

I think it is a wonderful thing you did nursing those babies and keeping the blind one. Good for you!


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




Carron

May 30, 2004, 9:00 AM

Post #9 of 15 (1849 views)

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Re: [Carol Schmidt] Feeding the Mascotas

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You hit the nail on the head about greasy, smelly, raw bones on the bed and furniture, and exposed my own shameful secret! Our Pom immediately takes hers and heads for the far corner at the foot of our bed. The rat terrier tries for the daybed in the living room if I am not watching. Otherwise, she takes hers to an old floor pillow beneath my computer. Because I love them, and know raw meat and bones are the most natural and healthy canine food since prehistoric times and they are very affordable in Mexico, and am a reader and student rather than a housekeeper, I am usually quite oblivious to the whole mess. (I do pop our bed linens into the washer frequently, especially when my husband is home!) Needless to say, when local friends visit we sit out in the yard. When visitors come from the States, I arrange for them to stay at a hotel! Generally speaking, I prefer the company of pets to most people anyway.


Carron

May 30, 2004, 9:08 AM

Post #10 of 15 (1847 views)

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Re: About Those Carrots

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Jennifer--How do you prepare the carrots for your dogs? Do you offer them partially cooked, fully cooked, or raw? Do you serve them mixed into a stew or do you serve them whole and perhaps still a little crunchy? We are probably going to keep our four rat terrier puppies. They make a precious little pack! And since they are entering the teething stage, anything they can chew on/play with/fill up on is something we will want to offer regularly.


jennifer rose

May 30, 2004, 10:01 AM

Post #11 of 15 (1841 views)

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Re: [Carron] About Those Carrots

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For the Dog Rice, the carrots are tossed into the blender, unpeeled and unwashed. That's mostly because it's easier than slicing them, and I have to get out the blender to blast the garlic and green vegetable into something they can't pick out of their rice. All of that's thrown in with the rice at the beginning of the cooking stage.

For snacks, they eat them whole, unpeeled and unwashed. I throw the carrots at the youngster, and he catches them with his mouth. Lately the old guy prefers his sliced, because that's more manageable for him. A late, great Doberman delighted in being presented with a carrot plucked straight from the garden. Remember, mine have giant Doberman teeth. The raw carrots probably don't contribute too much from a nutrtional standpoint, but the boys --at ages five and eleven -- have sparkly, white teeth.

Breeds differ. The mastiff didn't have the same mouth formation, and she just didn't get quite as thrilled about crunching into a whole raw carrot. To her credit, she did enjoy eating rotten and fermented apples that the Dobermans wouldn't touch.

I'd give your rat terrier pups whole carrots, and see what happens.


Marlene


May 30, 2004, 9:53 PM

Post #12 of 15 (1818 views)

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Re: [Carron] About Those Carrots

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The idea of feeding raw carrots to a dog as a crunchie seems brilliant! (My father feeds them to his horses and token mule but I hadn't thought of it as dog eats) I told Samantha she was in for a treat, and her little rotweiller ears perked up hopefully as she watched me walk to the fridge. She looked at it a little suspiciously (hey, that's no treat, that is the parrot's food is I am sure what she was thinking) but took the half carrot and proceeded to munch away on it. She asked for the other half and then decided that we should play catch with it. Good grief! ...she ultimately ate it too so I know this will be a regular "treat" for her. Thanks again for starting this thread and the doggie recipe ideas too.


Carol Schmidt


May 31, 2004, 12:50 AM

Post #13 of 15 (1814 views)

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Re: [Marlene] About Those Carrots

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The only way our Shih Tzu would allow a raw carrot into her mouth would be if it were covered with mayonnaise or gravy, which would be slurped off and the carrot rolled out of her mouth in one motion. Food goes in one side of her mouth and comes out the other, patooey. I'll try the blender tip though.

Carol SChmidt


Carron

May 31, 2004, 9:49 AM

Post #14 of 15 (1796 views)

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Re: [Carol Schmidt] About Those Carrots

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Our cat loves macaroni and cheese and will put up quite a fuss until he gets some. He spends a great deal of effort very carefully slurping off all the creamy, buttery cheese sauce and spitting out the remaining pasta, one codito at a time! He then looks at the remainder pile of naked macaroni, and looks back at us as though we have somehow insulted his refined palate.


Lavanda

Jun 19, 2004, 3:37 PM

Post #15 of 15 (1773 views)

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Re: Gourmet Mascotas

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I learned this from my mexicano hubby.

We bought sturdy clay bowls because they wouldnt slide around so much when the dogs would eat.

Hubby would make a stew of meat scraps, cabbage, rice, raw
eggs including the shells crunched up for calcium, carrots, a little garlic and stale tortillas. DO NOT allow any chicken bones in to prevent choking, but gizzards, livers, should be included.

We dont have dogs any longer, just cats.

However, I have heard and read that many dogs love chiles.

Anyone have any knowledge or experience with that?

Also, for pericos, give them some lettuce leaves, orange halves or quarters, stale or fresh bolillos or tortillas (corn). Also some mazorca to crunch/snack on.


!! Viva Mexico, warts and all !!!




(This post was edited by Lavanda on Jun 19, 2004, 3:42 PM)
 
 
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