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NEOhio

May 15, 2004, 6:40 PM

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Home Depot

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According to the district manager in NE Ohio any Home Depot here will do the paper work to transfer an employee to a Mexico store - with the attendant paperwork - if you are of value to them - and have recieved high evaluations for two years. This can be parttime work. You will need to be "somewhat bi-lingual". Being "of value" is translated to mean a trained position in their stores, ie. head cashier, lead for customer service, kitchen designer or other specialist. In American enclave areas they will be especially interested - Guadalajara is due for 6 more stores in 2 years - because as he said they expect a lot of baby-boomers to head your direction and they want them to retain their Home Depot habit and see a few familiar faces and accents in their foreign stores.

So a couple of years in the aisles at Home Depot, concentrate on acquiring a new language, and you could find yourself in Guadalajara with an American $10-12 hour job when coupled with a pension would give you a few years to settle in and then live the good life.

I thought you all might find this of some interest since many onn these boards seem to be trying to find a way down and are very concerned about your financial security. So if you are a few years away and can handle Home Depot this might be a way.

I called and asked about this because years ago I designed kitchens there and now design show kitchens for magazines and trade shows for KraftMaid Cabinetry a Masco Corporation. They will be carried in the Home Depots, along with Delta faucets and a bunch of other brands they manufacture. Apparently since I have been employee both Kraftmaid and Home Depot would consider me for a foreign move. I thought it would be easier to eventually own a kitchen and bath business if I arrived with working papers and looked at the lay of the land for a few years. Is there a ktichen and bath business around Lakeside?

Thank you all for the incredible amount of information I have gleaned these last few days - it will probably take me 3 days to be able to stand straight up after having hunched over the computer screen for hours on end - but I have loved every minute of it.

Best of all things to you all!



mkdutch

May 16, 2004, 9:15 AM

Post #2 of 25 (2615 views)

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Re: [awcaldwell] Home Depot

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There is a kitchen and bath showroom on the south side of the carretera in the La Floresta area, run by a young couple. There used to be one coming into Chapala from Ajijic that was a branch from Guad, but that one closed last year. Many of the smaller operations are family-run, so your chances there might be limited. Although if you offered yourself to them and local architects and builders as a consultant, you may be successful.

Home Depot, BTW, just bought the 20-store Home Mart chain in Mexico, so it will be converting those stores to Depots - There is one new Depot in Guad, and at least one other in the works (presumably the older Mart). Good luck, and remember to check out the special work permits that are necessary - perhaps Home Depot can help you grease the skids when applying for the special FM3 you will need.


Bubba

May 16, 2004, 12:24 PM

Post #3 of 25 (2587 views)

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Re: [mkdutch] Home Depot

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It will be interesting to see if Home Depot is successful down here. Home Mart, the chain being bought out by Home Depot, was a knockoff of the U.S. concept of the all-in-one big box store for handy homeowners doing their own home fixup and remodeling and they were apparently going broke when Home Depot thought to take over some of their remaining stores.

It is never safe to generalize about any society's values but this strikes me as a big gamble. Home improvement stores in the U.S. have prospered in a country with a vast middle class where the incremental cost of paying someone else to do one's handiwork is prohibitive. U.S. middle class society also places a high value on self-reliance so the homeowner who does his or her own tile work or wallpapering or other home improvement task is viewed favorably by his or her peers. In a land such as Mexico with a relatively small middle class and upper middle class and a vast lower income class eking out a living often at strenuous labor, the same values may not apply. I get the impression that, here, one reason to value having achieved middle and upper middle class status is that one needn't "stoop" to manual labor or engage in the endeavors of the building trades anymore. Add to this the fact that these trades are engaged in by countless thousands of those at the economic margins of society who do so at very reasonable cost to the homeowner, and there is reason to believe that the local middle class may not embrace the do-it-yourself notion so popular in the U.S.

A drive along the streets of Colonia Moderna near Centro in Guadalajara reveals the existence of countless tiendas engaged in the sale of new and used items used in the construction or improvement of residences throughout the metropolitan area. These small outlets provide employment and other opportunities for thousands of clerks and buyers and sellers and those engaged in the building trades in one form or another. Middle and upper middle class users of the services of the building trades use contractors who use their favored outlets to buy necessary materials for home improvements and, in the final anaysis, the finished product is so inexpensive compared to the U.S., that the effort to do the improvement outside of this system is not worth it. Circumventing this system may also be counterproductive in the near term since, in a society with vast numbers of people dependent upon the system to simply put food on the table, one's choosing to go it alone has ramifications beyond that simple decision.

So, into this mix comes Home depot hoping to serve the Mexican middle class and the anticipated huge influx of baby boomers from the U.S. If the previous poster is right, they are planning to import some of their U.S. workers at above market wages to serve this anticipated clientele. This will be disruptive which is both good and bad. After all, Wal-Mart forced its competition im Mexico to modernize their supply and distribution chains in order to compete with the predator from the north. We shall see.


Carol Schmidt


May 16, 2004, 3:25 PM

Post #4 of 25 (2556 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Home Depot

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A news story in the Mexico version of the Miami Herald a couple days ago announced the sale of HomeMart to Home Depot. The main argument they made for their expected success in Mexico was that so many Mexicans build their homes in stages, unable to afford all they want to build at one time, adding a room when they can afford it or absolutely need it.

I was thrilled with the news--the HomeMart in Queretaro just doesn't cut it, and going around to the dozens of small hardware and lumber stores trying to find something a bit unusual is hard work. On our monthly jaunt to Costco we always stop at HomeMart for all kinds of assorted items, many of which we still can't find even there. Two-sided carpet tape (needed for an art project) was one recent example. We had to have friends bring some down from the States.

From the way Mexicans have taken to the Big Box concept of discount warehouse stores like Wal-Mart and Costco, I think Home Depot will do fine. And it wil undoubtedly hurt many small Mexican hardware stores in the process, just as Wal-Mart has driven thousands of small businesses into bankruptcy in the U.S. and destroyed hundreds of small town business centers.

Carol Schmidt


gpk

May 17, 2004, 9:21 AM

Post #5 of 25 (2501 views)

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Re: [awcaldwell] Home Depot

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Are you sure HD would pay a US transferred employee at US rates? Ten to twelve dollars an hour qualifies as executive pay in Mexico. A cashier couldn't make more than 30-50 pesos an hour--probably less. Also, I think you would need to be pretty fluent not just in Spanish, but in BUILDER's Spanish. Do you know how many words there are for "bricks" in Mexico? They don't teach this stuff in language classes.


Marlene


May 17, 2004, 10:36 AM

Post #6 of 25 (2488 views)

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Re: [gpk] Home Depot

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I question that they would even hire someone from the US or Canada (let alone at those wages) to work in Home Depot Mexico, especially doing a job that many locals are either qualified or can be trained to do. Is it not a separate corporation like Walmart Mexico or Office Depot Mexico? (Try to return something purchased in the USA or Canada to Walmart or Office Depot here.)

The trend is, in areas with expat populations, the Walmart, Sam's Club, Office Depot (etc) staff are encouraged to learn English to assist foreigners who don't speak Spanish. Importing foreigners to do these jobs just because they are foreigners with a little Spanish is a stretch with the economy being the way it is here and so many Mexicans needing those jobs.


Judy in Ags


May 21, 2004, 7:53 PM

Post #7 of 25 (2406 views)

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Re: [Carol Schmidt] Home Depot

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I have to agree, Carol, that I believe Home Depot will do well here. It's not just the homeowners who would shop there, but what about all the small contractors who chase all over the city to 3 to 10 different places which either never did carry what they need (although someone said they do), or are out of the item. We buy all our sand, gravel, cement and lime and reinforcement steel from one place. My husband negotiated with them when we first came here that he would always buy from them if they gave him a good price and good service. They have kept their end of the bargain and through us have gotten other good customers in our area.

Everything else (Home Depot type items) we attempt to buy at Limsa which is a family-owned local home improvement-type store which treats us right and has very good service, but it is very frustrating to still have to do SO MUCH chasing around. For instance, they carry drain PVC, but not the water system PVC. They do carry a good selection of many items--everything from tile to electrical, etc., etc., but we keep encouraging them to expand to a one-stop store(s) because Home Depot WILL come some day and I'm afraid they will lose out.

We're about half-way through building our house and still have a list of things to bring back on this trip to the U.S. We bought all our electrical boxes there because the ones available here are about the thickness of sheet metal. We'd be thrilled to have a Home Depot in Aguascalientes, but we'll probably be done building our house by the time they come here.


NEOhio

May 21, 2004, 9:00 PM

Post #8 of 25 (2391 views)

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Re: [gpk] Home Depot

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Home Depot has a VERY specific corporate culture and they import it to whereever they are growing. They will take americans down and employ them to import the culture...will it be for a long time, probably not, but pick Guadalajara, with a proposed 5-6 stores, none opening simultaneously, but consecutively, and you could be there - employed at US wages for a 2 year period.

Home Depot has two types of stores - those catering to the "minor" do-it-yourselfer who is just reparing things around the house - those are generally the high end suburban stores. Their second type is the "Contractor store" these are generally located centrally amongst the suburban stores, but walk in there and this is the store you say - where are the trash bags, how come you only have 2 sprinklers to choose from - and it has a whole different vibe.

I am disappointed that they are coming to you....it is the end of an era and almost as bad a Walmarts in the landscape - luckily some parts of the US are beginning to say NO, just not soon enough or fast enough to stop the madness.

Best to you all..


Bubba

May 22, 2004, 2:40 PM

Post #9 of 25 (2335 views)

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Re: [awcaldwell] Home Depot

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Ken:

Home Depot may crash and it may succeed in spades. If it succeeds it will, indeed have a lasting affect on business here in Mexico. Good or bad according to one's point of view.

When I married a French woman in 1972, we embarked upon a family get acquainted trip to her native Tours in the Loire Valley. I had lived in France before but as a kid in Paris, another scene altogether. In the small Loire Valley town of Mont Louis near Tours, I got my first taste of village life and shopping at all of the small specialty stores was a real treat. When we wanted the very best, we would travel over to Tours and shop at the Les Hall Market for supurb meats, fowl, seafood and a variety of rillettes, pates, cheeses and other processed goodies which astonded this South Alabama boy. I had never even imagined food that good.

During any ordinary day, we would buy wines and aperitifs, fresh bread, cheeses, main courses, vegetables and desserts from a variety of shopkeepers, artisans and local farmers who took personal pride in their offerings and knew you and your proclivities. Shopping took time as one went from shop to shop for the specialities of each vendor or even drove out to farms and wineries for fresh produce and great local vintages. It was not a pain in the ass but an adventure.

On my most recent visit to the Loire Valley about two years ago, I found the town now part of suburban Tours and filled with giant supermarkets offering everything one could need under one vast roof. Les Hall is still there and street markets still sell wonderful quality food on market days but there is no way they can compete with the big market chains. Who is going to pay the equivalent of $20 US for a chicken from Brest when an ordinary supermarket chicken of the same size is available at the box store for the equivalent of $5 US? Slowly the box stores will squeeze out the mom-and-pop artisans and, in time, it may be that no one will remember why a chicken from Brest was light years better than the cardboard they are buying at the supermarket and, thus, worth a hell of a lot more money.

Box stores change the ambiance of a community. They also, notoriously, destroy the competition only to raise prices when they own a market. We can only hope for a resurgence of artisinal food suppliers, family farms and family run enterprises selling quality goods once the box store phenonenon has run its mediocre course.


(This post was edited by Bubba on May 22, 2004, 2:44 PM)


Esteban

May 22, 2004, 3:41 PM

Post #10 of 25 (2320 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Home Depot

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I totally disagree. Quality sells no matter what the change. Just because you can buy a big box of wine in a huge market, doesn't mean you won't buy quality wine where it is sold. A good example in the US is Trader Joe's. They sell quality stuff and are doing well as a small "market" of choice. They said the chain saw was going to ruin the job market in the forests. That didn't happen. You can buy cabinets at Home Depot but if you want hand crafted excellent quality and you have the money, you'll go to the craftsman. What the big box stores do is put the junk sellers out of business. Quality will always be in demand whether it be craftsmen, goods or anything else.


sfmacaws


May 22, 2004, 11:07 PM

Post #11 of 25 (2288 views)

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Re: [Esteban] Home Depot

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I agree with Esteban, the high priced junk is what bites the dirt first when the box stores move in. The discriminating or those who have the time and the money can still buy the freshest or the finest of whatever. Here's an example from Bubba's old stomping grounds in SF. In the 70's I lived in the Western Addition, commonly called the Fillmore district of San Francisco. The local stores sold the worst meat, the oldest chicken, expired lunch meats .... and they sold it for more money than the fresh, good stuff sold in the better parts of town. People who lived locally shopped locally because they were poor, didn't want to travel across town on a bus, would feel uncomfortable when they got there, it was what they were used to and mainly because they were buying food day to day with whatever money they had and couldn't afford to stock up or buy weekly. A few years later, when a big Safeway moved in it improved the quality of food available in the neighborhood and it was cheaper. I wasn't at all sorry to see some of those small stores go out of business.

In Mexico I am always irritated by the gringos who say they would never shop at WalMart (or Home Depot) or that it is ruining the country for the big stores to move in. It's the worst form of paternalism to want to keep the people in this country trapped in the past. Look in a WalMart store lot sometime and see who is shopping there. It is the middle class Mexican by and large, they are appreciative of the quantity deals, the lower prices and access to modern goods. It's their choice, it's not our business to critique their decisions. Anyway, the wailing and moaning won't change anything, it is a global world now and like the genie in the bottle, there is no way to put the cork back in and take us all back to the "good old days".

/end rant

Jonna


Judy in Ags


May 23, 2004, 6:46 AM

Post #12 of 25 (2270 views)

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Re: [sfmacaws] Home Depot

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In Mexico I am always irritated by the gringos who say they would never shop at WalMart (or Home Depot) or that it is ruining the country for the big stores to move in. It's the worst form of paternalism to want to keep the people in this country trapped in the past. Look in a WalMart store lot sometime and see who is shopping there. It is the middle class Mexican by and large, they are appreciative of the quantity deals, the lower prices and access to modern goods. It's their choice, it's not our business to critique their decisions. Anyway, the wailing and moaning won't change anything, it is a global world now and like the genie in the bottle, there is no way to put the cork back in and take us all back to the "good old days".

/end rant Well spoken, Jonna. You're right--we are not the parents of the Mexico, or of the world for that matter.

Jonna



(This post was edited by Judy in Ags on May 23, 2004, 6:47 AM)


Bubba

May 23, 2004, 11:42 AM

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Re: [Judy in Ags] Home Depot

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Interesting responses to my remarks about box stores and the way they change communities. I was specifically lamenting the way huge supermarkets have changed the way people live in rural France where the local food has traditionally been of a quality that North Americans can not even imagine but I also indicated that the box store phenomenon would prove both positive and negative as has been the case wherever this has occurred. For example, as I stated earlier here, WalMart has forced its Mexican competition such as Gigante and Soriana to change their business practices to improve operational efficiencies so they can compete with the WalMart juggernaut - at least for now. ( Readers may be unaware of the various enterprises owned and run by WalMart in Mexico under other names or the extraordinary power of its franchise in this country ).

I am pleased to note that many small and medium sized towns in the United States are beginning to see the possible long-term negative impact of these retail outlets duplicating, in many ways, the Sears Roebuck phenomenon of the past century. More and more towns are balking at becoming Plain Vanilla America. More power to them.

Then, a couple of posters, in attempting to counter my argument, actually shore up my point.

One cites Trader Joe's as an example of how a "small" store can compete effectively with the box sores in selling quality wine and other "gourmet" food items. In actuality, Trader Joe's is a huge chain of discount retail outlets located all over California and elsewhere which stresses "good value" in its wine inventories. Trader Joe's uses its enormous volume buying power to purchase and sell decent quality wines at cut rate prices and has found its niche by buying, in bulk, wines that are underpriced by the producers and close outs. Because it buys and sells in such large volume, it is able to pay bottom dollar for its inventories. Anyone who has shopped at Trader Joe's knows that you can find good, but not great, quality wine there but that the selection is very limited to those items meeting its strick criteria. The small wine store with a variety of wines ranging from pedestrian to supurb quality cannot and does no compete with Trader Joe's. Rather, Trader Joe's, with its massive inventories of mediocre frozen and processed merchandise, decent and drinkable but not exceptional wines, and marginal store locations is a separate phenomenon altogether. It is certainly not an example of how small stores can compete with large stores by any stretch of the imagination.

Now, as to comments regarding the Western Addition section of San Francisco, historical events there also shore up my point that the phenomenon of the big box store moving into a marginal neighborhood signals far reaching change in that neighborhood. The city of San Francisco is quite small geographically and hemmed in by water on three sides. As living in the city gained popularity, the centrally located but dirt poor black ghetto that was known as the Fillmore/Western Addition became a popular place for white gentrification. The movement was spearheaded by the affluent gay community spreading out from the Castro and Noe Valley neighborhoods and white flight back from the suburbs to the central city which had become overcrowded and expensive. Whites from other parts of the city or the suburbs could buy run down but magnificent victorians in the Western Addition for a song because it was, in those days, a dangerous ghetto, and they could remodel them into splendid residences relatively cheaply . As this dramatic demographic shift took place, the poor blacks who had bought the rotten meats and other merchandise sold by small stores in the neighborhood, were forced out and replaced by middle class and affluent whites and asians. The Super Safeway cited was built on a huge vacant lot left by the bulldozers of the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency in the 1960s and 1970s that displaced large numbers of poor blacks so the area would be more enticing to the whites and asians they were trying to attract. That huge Safeway was not built to serve the poor black community being forced from their homes any more that WalMart moved to Mexico to improve the lives of the peasantry here. I should know. I was a banker in San Francisco in those days and personally helped finance a number of redelopment projects in the Western Addition.

One day, historians will look at redevelopment schemes such as that that occurred in the Western Addition as callous and short sighted. But, by God, they have their Super Safeway now.

What is my point? As I said before, the big box stores are a mixed bag. They follow the money rather than drag it along with them. Anybody reading this thread who thinks Bubba is against box stores has misread my message. I buy almost all of my meat at Costco because of its excellent quality. I shop regularly in Guadalajara not only at the box stores but at Gran Plaza, Plaza Mexico, Plaza Terra Nova, Liverpool, Bodega, etc. I also enjoy shopping the small tiendas in traditional ares of town where one must go from shop to shop seeking stuff for the project of the day.

As a gringo who first visited Mexico in the early 1970s, I applaud the incredible progress here from the internet to the satellite dishes to the box stores to the beer on ice in the Oxxo stores that make my road trips more relaxing. I also applaud the incredible toll roads empty of the 80% of Mexicans who can't afford them and the great luxury hotels and condos making beach life a pleasure. I'm pleased that the relatively small Mexican middle class can join me at the WalMart but I am not blind to my environment. Gringo paternalism, indeed!


(This post was edited by Bubba on May 23, 2004, 12:56 PM)


mepsi

May 23, 2004, 12:23 PM

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Re: [Bubba] Home Depot

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Bubba, don't forget the assault the Safeway's, Lucky's, Winn-Dixie, Furr's and many other foodstores are under by the Walmart superstores. Some of these are already gone, some are on their way out and some will be able to adapt to the changes. Ultimately I believe all of us will suffer for the changes.

Can't you just imagine a Walmart Superstore (or any other) with union benefits?

Monte


Bubba

May 23, 2004, 1:27 PM

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Re: [mepsi] Home Depot

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Monte:

I could not agree more.

Those other supermarket chains, many with union clerks, will be forced to downsize and trash the unions and many will be forced out of business. U.S. vendors (and Mexican vendors for that matter) will not be able to compete with Chinese slave labor and be forced to shut down or screw their employees to the wall. Once WalMart has destroyed the competition, who's to say whether or not their prices are low since there will be no point of comparison.

Fortunately the nascent movement away from WalMart Cheap&Tacky and back to quality is growing and safeguards in the U.S. will probably revitalize competition. Do we have confidence that the less transparent and clubby commercial infrastructure in Mexico will react the same to this trend toward oligopoly? Maybe not but what do I care. I and my expatriot contemporaries can afford to shop in the mega stores which are much more upscale here than in the U.S. As Alfred E. Neuman famously said, "What, me worry?"

Incidentally, when I speak of Chinese slave labor, I speak as an ex-international banker working in a bank with a large number of filthy rich Chinese trader/industrialist clients. There are many examples I could cite but just one will suffice. One of our clients was a Hong Kong company that owned a plant in Mainland China that manufactured toys for a well known Italian toy maker which actually made all of its toys in China. They owned a four story manufacturing plant near Canton where their employees slaved endless days on the first three floors and lived during the work week on the fourth floor. The employees never went home during the six day work week as, had they done so, their jobs would be given to others. There was a terrible night fire there at one point where many of the workers living in the roof level dormitory died because they could not escape from the building since the fire escapes, which were being used to warehouse inventories, were totally blocked by those inventories.

This is the kind of thing you support to save a few bucks on those "Italian" toys.


Marlene


May 23, 2004, 2:41 PM

Post #16 of 25 (2195 views)

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Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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I rarely shop at the Walmart in Mazatlŕn since I don't find it to have any special bargains. I hunted down a cover for my car there, but it certainly wasn't a bargain. We sometimes go there if we are in the neighborhood, and pick up some groceries (which we could get anywhere else), but we have lots of other big retail outlets here to choose from that are closer to home and offer the same types of merchandise.

I must say, I do like the Home Depot in Culiacan. Really good service and some neat stuff we don't see here in Mazatlan. Lots of the same stuff we do see here, though.

Yesterday we shopped in Casa Campesino in the downtown of Mazatlan. It is a traditional country store where the farmers shop and has been around for ages. We bought a dustpan and a pair of needle nosed pliers, total less than $3.50 USD. I also shopped next door in what I call the "Dollar Store", La Bodega . I needed to pick up a few things like garbage bags, one of many birthday gifts we buy regularly, and discovered that the entire store has a discount. No advertising, no flyers, simply a cardboard sign or two. My bill was less than $10.00 USD. I would have spent more money in Walmart for sure. Unfortunately the limited music supply stores have no bargains and musicians pay through the nose for their necessities here in Mazatlán. Ni modo.


gpk

May 23, 2004, 3:48 PM

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Re: [Marlene] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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There have been articles in the papers in (AM in Leon, Guanajuato) that say that Gigante, Soriana and Comercial Mexicana are joining forces to combat Walmart. They will supposedly unify their purchasing/distribution systems. I hope it works. Home Depot in Leon is very nice, and contractors do use it since prices are lower than most smaller stores. It is a fairly bad approximation of Home Depot in the US, though. The staff is helpful, but not that well informed or trained. They have trouble keeping items in stock. The store is not as well organized as it shouild be. All these are fairly common problems with the Mexican retail operations I am familiar with.


Texwheel

May 23, 2004, 4:56 PM

Post #18 of 25 (2175 views)

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Re: [mepsi] Home Depot

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I can tell you from personal experience in the Dallas/Fort Worth area that Walmart is scaring even the big chain supermarkets to death. They are trying to figure out how to reduce their cost structure to compete.
Tom Williams
Georgetown, Texas
Texwheel@aol.com


mepsi

May 23, 2004, 5:29 PM

Post #19 of 25 (2166 views)

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Re: [Texwheel] Home Depot

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IMO, Walmart's prices are only as low as they are forced to be by the competition. Want to see high prices? Eliminate the competition. Their prices are, to me, primarily hype. Some areas of their stores have better prices but many other departments have prices significantly above their competition. Check the TV and computer areas for example. Many prices are at the highest retail in the area.

Overall, shopping at Walmart is just more work than it's worth to me.

Monte


Bubba

May 23, 2004, 5:53 PM

Post #20 of 25 (2159 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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Marlene:

I presume that you know that the "Dollar Store", La Bodega, is owned by WalMart which they run as their downscale WalMart. Often the same items for sale cheaper. WalMart also owns Suburbia stores which have cheap prices. I think I read somewhere that they even own Sanborns. WalMart in Mexico is like kudzu in Alabama. It starts with one tree and it has soon devoured the whole forest strangling everything that gets in its way.


(This post was edited by Bubba on May 23, 2004, 5:56 PM)


Marlene


May 23, 2004, 7:48 PM

Post #21 of 25 (2141 views)

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Re: [Bubba] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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I would be very surprised if this operation was connected to Walmart (I would love to post a photo of it so you would know why I say that), so I undoubtedly have misspelled or made up the name. Purchases came in a plain unmarked bag and there seems to be no name on my sales receipt. I will check that out.

I recently heard we are getting a Sanborns in Mazatlan. I understand they are quite the operation, though I haven't seen one personally. Interesting that it could also be affiliated with Walmart too.


Cynthia7

May 24, 2004, 8:32 PM

Post #22 of 25 (2071 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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Marlene -Walmart does own the Bodega chain - formerly Aurrora. I don't know if is the Bodega you shopped is one of them but it is usually near a Infonovit area. I find the prices pretty much the same as at Walmart and even at their Superama- which is their upscale store. The appearances of the stores are entirely different but the merchandise identical-for the most part. My beautiful blue pitcher was the same price at all three stores. I don't know if you are aware of all the wonderful things that Walmart does for a community . They have a whole section on their website informing people about their literacy program, college scholarships,etc. Just to be aware - you might take a peek. I do think they have helped Gigante, Commercial Mexicana,etc. spruce up a bit. I like vegetables and fruits-clean,cooled,fresh. I am happy Walmart doesn't turn their refrigerators and freezers off at night to save electricity. I am glad that they accept returns willingly. I like everything with a price on it. I like knowing that they will restock things that sell well regularly. I like the fact that they have Electric Mart Carts for those that need them, From what I can tell I think many Mexicans like it,also. Yes they are large. Yes they have a glass ceiling . Yes they drive a hard bargain on vendors but many people in many lands are able to have some things they never had before.


jennifer rose

May 24, 2004, 10:03 PM

Post #23 of 25 (2053 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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I was thrilled when HomeMart came to town, visiting the store with such frequency that everyone joked that I was only steps away from getting a green apron and a job there. Contractors do qualify for discounts, and so can anyone else who can chat up the manager and ring up $20,000 M.N. in purchases. While I still have an account at the neighborhood hardware store for odds and ends, it's a real pleasure to be able to buy everything under a single roof.

I tend to do nearly all of my grocery shopping at Costco, Walmart and the local tianguis, just because all of the above are closer to my home than other stores. In Morelia is a Costco salvage store with some fantastic bargains. This morning I bought two Hunter ceiling fans for $500 each. Last week they had deluxe propane grill selling for $2000 which, if perfect, was going for around $6000 at the regular store. Pregnancy and prostate cancer detection kits were going for about $20. They were practically giving away restaurant-size cans of black olives and tomato paste. (Pesos, my friends.)

Amid all of this discussion, I'm somewhat surprised that no one's mentioned the ISSSTE stores. There's one in almost every city, and the quality varies, but there are some genuine deals to be had at those stores. And one need not be a government employee to shop there.


Marlene


May 24, 2004, 11:28 PM

Post #24 of 25 (2047 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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Right you are Jennifer. I have been told about the bargains there. I am going to check it out now that you have posed the reminder.


gpk

May 25, 2004, 10:27 AM

Post #25 of 25 (2007 views)

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Re: [Marlene] Walmart, Home Depot vs small store shopping

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Sanborns is owned by the Slim family (owners of Telmex). VIPs is owned by Walmart Mexico.
 
 
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