Mexico Connect
Forums  > Areas > Central Highlands


D.G.

Oct 30, 2003, 7:38 AM

Post #1 of 10 (1935 views)

Shortcut

Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
Everyone has favorites, so this question is about where to buy the best seafood products in San Miguel, either restaurant meals or do-it-yourself fresh fish. What do you recommend?



lbc

Oct 30, 2003, 11:49 AM

Post #2 of 10 (1916 views)

Shortcut

Re: [D.G.] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
My Mexican friends and I, we buy fresh fish and shrimp etc. at the Tianguis on Tuesday. We enjoy the quality and freshness of the seafood there.


gpk

Oct 30, 2003, 1:32 PM

Post #3 of 10 (1910 views)

Shortcut

Re: [lbc] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
El Campanario has (had?) great fish. I haven't been there in a couple years--so maybe it's gone.
Also, the Costco in Leon (and probably in Queretaro) has just started selling frozen, farmed catfish that is delicious.


Carol Schmidt


Oct 30, 2003, 9:57 PM

Post #4 of 10 (1888 views)

Shortcut

Re: [D.G.] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
Some of the restaurants advertise fresh fish. Bella Italia in the Hotel Sautto courtyard gets its seafood and fish fresh each Thursday, and their mussels meal has 24 large mussels for 180 pesos! It's one of my occasional treats. Their salmon sauced pasta is excellent.

Harry Bissett's also advertises fresh fish, and their daily specials often feature fresh snapper cooked various ways, including a grilled whole fish with various sauces that is excellent. Their oysters--half shell, shooters, fried or many other preparations--are among my favorites. They have a deli next door which sometimes has fresh fish, and I order large shrimp from them for parties and such.

Habanero's also features fresh fish--their bacon-wrapped shrimp are exceptional. I have bought shrimp at the Tiangus and they were much cheaper than Bissett's, and I didn't get sick--I worry about fish that is sitting out on a counter block for hours on end at an open market. I do buy farmed fresh salmon and fish at CostCo in Celaya on my monthly run.

Gigante has a large display of fresh fish and seafood though I've only bought oysters there, and they were not what I expected--tiny, the jar mostly brine water.

As in the States, much of what restaurants serve is frozen and not all that great. Nirvana has a seafood soup which is a thick curry sauce with large chunks of calamari, shrimp and fish--I doubt if the fish is fresh, but the soup is delicious! For 45 pesos it is pretty much a complete meal.

The fish and chips entree at Hecho en Mexico is fairly routine but I get it sometimes. They have a skewer of grilled shrimp that you can get as a meal, appetizer, or accompaniment to a four-veggie plate that is also good.

I found the Puertacita Thursday fresh fish specials to be overpriced, small portions, and nothing to write home about.

Carol Schmidt


elcomputo

Oct 30, 2003, 11:28 PM

Post #5 of 10 (1883 views)

Shortcut

Re: [D.G.] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
I don't know the name of the place. It's under a tent on that street that borders Espinos on the Ancha. Just go out Espinos (or El Tomate's) door, turn left, then turn left again at the next street. (Wish I could find my missing map of SMA.) About 50 yards down this street, on the left, you will come to the tent. It is typically crowded, and for good reason.

The place is owned by an older gringo in partnership with a home boy who does all the cooking. They serve fish tacos -- two fairly large and very tasty fish fillets on tortillas, with fixins on the side, for 100 pesos. This is one of the best bargains in SMA. The cerveza is also reasonable priced, and they serve a really good cole slaw for 5 pesos.

I understand the burgers there are quite good, too. They import the beef from Chicago. A quarter pound burger is 250 and a half pound job 350.

The waitress is bi-lingual.

To comment on something mentioned in this string, frozen fish is often preferable to fresh fish. I used to buy the frozen tuna and halibut at Trader Joe's in the States. It was flash frozen at sea and shrink wrapped. It retained all the great flavor when defrosted correctly. What's more, it was caught far out at sea. Mexican fish are caught close to the coast and so are more likely to have been dining on the massive amounts of raw pollution that Mexico dumps directly into the sea without treatment. This pollution includes known carcinogens like cadmium that are absorbed by the lowest elements of the food change that eventually get ingested by the fish.

The situation in the United States is not much better.

Actually, anything taken from close to the coast in any part of the Gulf of Mexico is quite likely to be polluted. Diners in Texas are warned to avoid eating raw oysters unless they have been certified "clean," which means they were probably raised at "oyster farms."

Of course, for a guy my age, polluted sea life is probably not going to shorten my life appreciably. The question is how horrible a death might result from cadmium-laced fish. So I stick to the farm raised trout sold at Costco. I used to buy their salmon in the States, but it's just too expensive down here at about 1200 pesos a pound. Anyway, it's just been reported that the levels of carcenogenic PCB's found in farm-raised Atlantic salmon has been found to be way higher than the lowest level EPA warns is dangerous for human consumption.

I won't even go into the issue of how the factory fishing vessels from all over the world have swept the oceans practically clean of fish, reducing many species to levels that practically guarantee their extinction. So pretty soon we may not have to worry about polluted fish. There won't be any fish in the sea to eat at all!


Carol Schmidt


Nov 2, 2003, 12:53 AM

Post #6 of 10 (1849 views)

Shortcut

Re: [elcomputo] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
Did you really mean 100 pesos for two fish tacos from a sidewalk stand? About $9 US? I heard it was around a dollar US, which means 10 pesos. And 250 pesos for a burger? That would be around $23 US! And I've bought the farm-raised salmon at Costco for about the same as it was in the U.S., less than $5 US a pound. The 1200 pesos a pound figure you cite is probably 120 pesos for a kilo, and I have never seen it even that high. Check your decimal points! I think in a previous post you said breakfast someplace around the bus depot was 250 pesos, or around $23! Wow, has SMA gotten expensive!

Have you heard anything on your dog yet?

Carol Schmidt


sandykayak


Nov 3, 2003, 10:02 AM

Post #7 of 10 (1824 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Carol Schmidt] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
whew, glad it wasn't just me... i was trying to work out those prices and I'm hopeless at math.

Ten bucks for two fish tortillas with the fixin's didn't sound cheap but I was amazed when a rotisserie chicken in Chapala was five dollars, when i can get one on sale for $4 in Publix in Miami.

Admittedly, we did get tortillas, potato salad, coleslaw, and hot sauce. But I was wondering how the mexicans could afford that.
Sandy Kramer
Miami, Fla & El Parque


elcomputo

Nov 6, 2003, 3:35 PM

Post #8 of 10 (1774 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Carol Schmidt] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
Yep. Should have been 10 pesos, not 100. Also, I think I said for two tacos. (I remembered getting two, but I didn't remember paying 20 pesos for them.) It should have been 10 pesos for a taco, which is still a great deal, as the filet is very large and tasty. One caution, however: the fish is served straight out of the pan, so let it cool for at least a minute before biting into it.


(This post was edited by elcomputo on Nov 6, 2003, 3:39 PM)


jennifer rose

Nov 6, 2003, 4:14 PM

Post #9 of 10 (1772 views)

Shortcut

Re: [sandykayak] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post |

In Reply To
But I was wondering how the mexicans could afford that.


Please be somewhat more circumspect when making generalizations. There are Mexicans who could buy and sell everyone on this list several times over. And there's a large middle class. There are many, many who would take your remark as a real slap in the face.


Carol Schmidt


Nov 6, 2003, 4:55 PM

Post #10 of 10 (1763 views)

Shortcut

Re: [sandykayak] Fish in San Miguel

Can't Post | Private Reply
Rotisserie chickens range from 25 to 35 pesos from the local establishments here in San Miguel (about $2.25 to $3.10 U.S.), mostly depending on size of the chickens, tortillas and chiles included, while CostCo sells bigger ones for 45 pesos over in Queretero.

Jennifer makes a good point--there is no such thing as an accurate generalization about all Mexicans just as there is no such thing about U.S. citizens or any other diverse group! I've heard that the original 120 or so families of Spanish descent who received "land grants" from Spain in the 1500s are wealthy beyond our understanding to today. The richest U.S. citizens are also wealthy beyond my comprehension, while we still have something like one in four kids living in poverty (U.S. standard of poverty) and 43 million without health insurance. I think technically many of us on SS would also fall below that U.S. poverty level while we're "rich gringos" to many here who see us eating in restaurants, taking cabs, driving cars, etc.

Carol Schmidt
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4