Mexico Connect
Forums  > General > Living, Working, Retiring


Andy in Monterrey

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #1 of 11 (1432 views)

Shortcut

Question on nationalizing a 10 year old pickup

Can't Post |
I heard that you can nationalize a ten-year old pickup for 5,000 pesos. However, I also heard from someone on this board that you have to pay an additional 15% IVA on the value of the truck. Some Mexicans that I asked about this told me that you only have to pay the 5,000 pesos. Does anybody else know about this and can tell me exactly where I can get the correct information on this, preferably on the web?



Agustin

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #2 of 11 (1424 views)

Shortcut

Question on nationalizing a 10 year old pickup

Can't Post |
: I heard that you can nationalize a ten-year old pickup for 5,000 pesos. However, I also heard from someone on this board that you have to pay an additional 15% IVA on the value of the truck. Some Mexicans that I asked about this told me that you only have to pay the 5,000 pesos. Does anybody else know about this and can tell me exactly where I can get the correct information on this, preferably on the web?<p>
Visit
www.paisano.gob.mx


DavidMTY

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #3 of 11 (1423 views)

Shortcut

Question on nationalizing a 10 year old pickup

Can't Post |
Hi Andy,<p>The correct information is that the quoted figure is common and it includes 15% I.V.A. There is no web site that will hit your confusion on the head. That's because you are a righteous kind of guy. The "importers" you are hearing quoted are fabricating invoices or bringing in junkers, or both. 15% of USD $1,000 is under 1500 pesos, right? Of course all interior sales get zapped by I.V.A. But it is not to discrete to discuss this corruption in public, even by the rare honest fellow.<p>Best...David(MTY)<p><p>
: I heard that you can nationalize a ten-year old pickup for 5,000 pesos. However, I also heard from someone on this board that you have to pay an additional 15% IVA on the value of the truck. Some Mexicans that I asked about this told me that you only have to pay the 5,000 pesos. Does anybody else know about this and can tell me exactly where I can get the correct information on this, preferably on the web?<p>


Jim in Cancun

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #4 of 11 (1424 views)

Shortcut

You usually have to pay mordidas when...

Can't Post |
<center><img src="http://www.mexconnect.com/jim.gif"></center><p>


Andy in Monterrey

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #5 of 11 (1423 views)

Shortcut

Could you please tell us how we can contact your friend? nfm

Can't Post |
: ...you don't know another way of getting the job done or you know and don't want to do it.<p>: I have an American friend who has been importing 10-year-old pickups for years--all legal and above-board and according to the law that permits importation of certain types of 10-year-old vehicles without the payment of import taxes. I will ask him how much he pays if anything.<p>: He brings them in and gets a 30-day hologram sticker. He sells them within 30 days with the American plates still on them and the new owner has to pay $600 pesos to get the new plates and tarjeta de circulacion.<p>: I have one of his trucks. All legal.<p>


DavidMTY

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #6 of 11 (1423 views)

Shortcut

&quot;Vehicle&quot; = two door pick-up, 10(+) years old, under 3250 KG capacity

Can't Post |
: Jim in Cancun's friend certainly sounds like he is doing what you want to do, Andy. There is basically no import tax to bring a vehicle in. I.V.A. is not technically an import tax, i.e. duty, it is a consumption tax no final consumer gets away with. For example for the 5000 you quote, the breakdown is typically like this:<p>: Transit Rights: 150 pesos
: Other Customs fees: 600 pesos
: I.V.A. on $1000 USD est: 1500 pesos
: total = 2250 pesos<p>: You must have a customs broker license to do the import. Custom's liscenses cost a lot, so self-import is not an option. So you can see the profit is the 2750 pesos to the agente aduanera. Plus a 200 pesos expedite mordida somewhere along the line to the customs agent (not a government bribe, just to the achinchicles of the customs agent and not always necessary but very common) so he gets off his butt and doesn't make you wait all day in the frustrating hot Sun at the border entry point.<p>: Finally Jim in Cancun mentions the temporary amount of time to get a tag and make the sale with the "American plated vehicle." Jim is right about that as an observation, but I should clarify that at the moment the vehicle was imported, it became Mexican,selling it at this point is a Mexican vehicle sale, as the plates lose their significance (except to avoid problems & prove you are within your time if stopped by transito) along with the vehicle with no tags. The 30 days is simply so you have time to transport the vehicle from the border to your state and make the appropriate tramites to put the new plates on the car.<p>: I won't comment on whether Jim's sharp friend has a business or not, nor whether he should be collecting IVA again upon selling the vehicle, since this is not your question and the friend hasn't had any problems. In any case, based on the corruption I have heard being done, Jim's friend probably could qualify as an angel.<p>: Best...David(MTY)<p>: : ...you don't know another way of getting the job done or you know and don't want to do it.<p>: : I have an American friend who has been importing 10-year-old pickups for years--all legal and above-board and according to the law that permits importation of certain types of 10-year-old vehicles without the payment of import taxes. I will ask him how much he pays if anything.<p>: : He brings them in and gets a 30-day hologram sticker. He sells them within 30 days with the American plates still on them and the new owner has to pay $600 pesos to get the new plates and tarjeta de circulacion.<p>: : I have one of his trucks. All legal.<p>


DavidMTY

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #7 of 11 (1426 views)

Shortcut

You usually have to pay mordidas when...

Can't Post |
Jim in Cancun's friend certainly sounds like he is doing what you want to do, Andy. There is basically no import tax to bring a vehicle in. I.V.A. is not technically an import tax, i.e. duty, it is a consumption tax no final consumer gets away with. For example for the 5000 you quote, the breakdown is typically like this:<p>Transit Rights: 150 pesos
Other Customs fees: 600 pesos
I.V.A. on $1000 USD est: 1500 pesos
total = 2250 pesos<p>You must have a customs broker license to do the import. Custom's liscenses cost a lot, so self-import is not an option. So you can see the profit is the 2750 pesos to the agente aduanera. Plus a 200 pesos expedite mordida somewhere along the line to the customs agent (not a government bribe, just to the achinchicles of the customs agent and not always necessary but very common) so he gets off his butt and doesn't make you wait all day in the frustrating hot Sun at the border entry point.<p>Finally Jim in Cancun mentions the temporary amount of time to get a tag and make the sale with the "American plated vehicle." Jim is right about that as an observation, but I should clarify that at the moment the vehicle was imported, it became Mexican,selling it at this point is a Mexican vehicle sale, as the plates lose their significance (except to avoid problems & prove you are within your time if stopped by transito) along with the vehicle with no tags. The 30 days is simply so you have time to transport the vehicle from the border to your state and make the appropriate tramites to put the new plates on the car.<p>I won't comment on whether Jim's sharp friend has a business or not, nor whether he should be collecting IVA again upon selling the vehicle, since this is not your question and the friend hasn't had any problems. In any case, based on the corruption I have heard being done, Jim's friend probably could qualify as an angel.<p>Best...David(MTY)<p>: ...you don't know another way of getting the job done or you know and don't want to do it.<p>: I have an American friend who has been importing 10-year-old pickups for years--all legal and above-board and according to the law that permits importation of certain types of 10-year-old vehicles without the payment of import taxes. I will ask him how much he pays if anything.<p>: He brings them in and gets a 30-day hologram sticker. He sells them within 30 days with the American plates still on them and the new owner has to pay $600 pesos to get the new plates and tarjeta de circulacion.<p>: I have one of his trucks. All legal.<p>


Un mexicano

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #8 of 11 (1422 views)

Shortcut

Do you mean that anybody can legally import a ....

Can't Post |
10+ years, two-doors, pick-up truck under 3250 kgs capacity?
I mean, can I buy such a truck in the US, bring it into Mexico, and then pay $5000 pesos and import it?. Completely legal?. Sure?


Un mexicano

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #9 of 11 (1423 views)

Shortcut

I thought the &quot;franquicia&quot; program was over

Can't Post |
And that it was required that the vehicle had entered the country before a certain date to be eligible for that program.


arbon

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #10 of 11 (1422 views)

Shortcut

anybody (with Mexican Drivers Licence) can legally import a ....

Can't Post |
: 10+ years, two-doors,(NO EXTRACABS) pick-up truck under 3250 kgs capacity?
: I mean, can I buy such a truck in the US, bring it into Mexico, and then pay $5000 pesos and import it?. Completely legal?. Sure?<p>


DavidMTY

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #11 of 11 (1426 views)

Shortcut

I thought the &quot;franquicia&quot; program was over

Can't Post |
The pick-up import program is and always has been independent of the one time legalization procedure for the "chocolates," which applied to 8-9 year old or older wide range of non-luxury, non-sport passenger vehicles. <p>The pick-up program has been renewed each year a few years now. I recall that it was to correct an imbalance in production of pickups, in agricultural areas more than anything?? <p>Note, direct importation is MUY different from legalization in the sense that your pickup, imported according to this procedure is always 100% legal, with the 'blessing' of the government, hence it is a simple import and not a "legalization". The legalization (regulazation) program, which was a lot more expensive, was designed something like the US Amnesty legalization programs. I find that observation interesting!
Best...David(MTY)<p>
: And that it was required that the vehicle had entered the country before a certain date to be eligible for that program.<p>
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4