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Uncle Jack


Apr 28, 2003, 9:10 AM

Post #1 of 23 (6197 views)

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Restrictions on food?

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Other than alcohol, fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats, are there any restrictions on bringing in foodstuffs. I am particularly concerned with spices and condiments; wasabe, sesame oil, nouc mam, oyster sauce, fennel, sage, etc. Also, how about canned goods; commercial, not home canned.

UJ



gpk

Apr 28, 2003, 9:20 AM

Post #2 of 23 (6180 views)

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Re: [Uncle Jack] Restrictions on food?

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I never had any problems with sealed packaged foods, spices, etc.--but I came by plane. Driving is probably different.


jennifer rose

Apr 28, 2003, 9:41 AM

Post #3 of 23 (6178 views)

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Re: [Uncle Jack] Restrictions on food?

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Other than alcohol, fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats, are there any restrictions on bringing in foodstuffs. I am particularly concerned with spices and condiments; wasabe, sesame oil, nouc mam, oyster sauce, fennel, sage, etc. Also, how about canned goods; commercial, not home canned.

UJ


Sesame oil, nuoc mam, wasabe, and oyster sauce are all readily available in Mexico at your local health food store or gourmet shop. So too are sage and fennel. After living here a long time, I've learned "If it's available in Mexico, don't bother importing it." You're going to be living near Guadalajara, where you can buy just about anything. Familiarize yourself with what's available.

There is no problem with canned goods. However, in light of Mad Cow and whatever is the latest meat scare du jour, I did see a notice prohibiting even canned meat products at the airport the other day. It's not worth risking confiscation.

Seeds and beans are prohibited. Two flights ago, back in February, my luggage didn't arrive with me, and as unaccompanied luggage, it was inspected. And my expensive German rice beans and French flageolets were confiscated, along with the smoked pig ears for the dogs. Others have reported losing their caraway and poppy seeds in the past.


(This post was edited by jennifer rose on Apr 28, 2003, 9:43 AM)


Georgia


Apr 28, 2003, 2:25 PM

Post #4 of 23 (6149 views)

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Re: Pig ears

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Guido the Wonder Dog, my faithful companion, has a smoked pig ear addiction. Do I surmise from your post that this delicacy is unavailable in Mexico?


Estanislao


Apr 28, 2003, 3:03 PM

Post #5 of 23 (6143 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Restrictions on food?

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I have "a friend" ;-) who couldn't resist smuggling a kilo of Michoacán beans back through US Customs. My "friend" has spent the last 5 months squashing the little beetles that hatched out of them in his pantry.
--
"It is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again."
John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts - The Log From The Sea Of Cortez
--
Estanislao


jennifer rose

Apr 28, 2003, 3:11 PM

Post #6 of 23 (6142 views)

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Re: [Georgia] Pig ears

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Guido the Wonder Dog, my faithful companion, has a smoked pig ear addiction. Do I surmise from your post that this delicacy is unavailable in Mexico?


I haven't searched the entire country. Only Morelia and Patzcuaro. Costco sold them up until about a year ago, and I've begged the manager to re-stock them. I've hounded every pet store and veterinary supply, I've dogged from the mercado de abastos to every single market in town, and there are none. It's reached the point where I'm giving some consideration to buying fresh pig ears and hanging 'em out to dry. Well, if it works for cecina, would it not work for pig ears?


Uncle Jack


Apr 28, 2003, 3:41 PM

Post #7 of 23 (6137 views)

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Thanks, jennifer..........

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.....I understand that many of the items I was talking about are available in Guadalajara.

My question was, will I have any trouble bringing in my already substantial supply of these item with us in our car? I would prefer not to have to give away or throw out several hundred dollars worth of spices and condiments if they are not allowed. The canned goods we would probably bring would not be meat products.

Hey, sorry about your beans; that would make me a little cranky too. In the past, I used a lot of smoked hog jowls......never had any ears.

Your humble servant,

UJ


jennifer rose

Apr 28, 2003, 4:02 PM

Post #8 of 23 (6133 views)

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Re: [Uncle Jack] Thanks, jennifer..........

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My question was, will I have any trouble bringing in my already substantial supply of these item with us in our car? I would prefer not to have to give away or throw out several hundred dollars worth of spices and condiments if they are not allowed. The canned goods we would probably bring would not be meat products.


Well, you didn't state "already substantial supply." You ought not have any problem, except for those items which are or which resemble beans or seeds.


Esteban

Apr 28, 2003, 6:17 PM

Post #9 of 23 (6112 views)

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Re: [Uncle Jack] Thanks, jennifer..........

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I brought all my collection of spices down with no problem. Included was soy sauce, vinegars and a bunch of the dried powedered spices that one has around the house. However, believe it or not, here in Mazatlan, a place with a lot of seafood, I haven't found Wasabi nor have I found pickeled ginger. Lately, a new sushi bar opened (not even close to what you find in the US) and I noticed they had pickled ginger. I'll be stopping by to see if I can buy a cuartito. On the other side of the coin, the yellow fin tuna comes in by the ton and if you network with the right folks, you can get some very good high grade tuna for sashimi. Pure fresh crabmeat is running 50 pesos for half a kilo so you put that with some cheap avacado, cucumber, rice and nori (sold at Walmart) and you have a California roll for almost nothing.


Uncle Jack


Apr 28, 2003, 7:20 PM

Post #10 of 23 (6107 views)

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Sounds good to me

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"Pure fresh crabmeat is running 50 pesos for half a kilo"

I think that Patty and I can deal with that!

UJ


David Eidell

Apr 28, 2003, 9:48 PM

Post #11 of 23 (6094 views)

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Re: [Uncle Jack] Sounds good to me

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If it wasn't for a strong addiction to Bubbies Kosher Dills, Gnarly 8-year old white cheddar and crisp Fuji apples I would never have to go back to the Estados Unidos. Just made a trip to "Bed Bath & Beyond" where I purchased a set of Henckel knives, a glass mug set for my cappuccino machine, and a stainless milk frothing cup. Forgive my unholy fondness for a cup of expresso while munching a taco de huitlacoche, or is it Cappuccino with birria?

I have friends that are coming south to visit late in June. Jack and Mary hailed from inner "New Yawk". They -thought- that they had experienced the ultimate kosher pickle (undoubtedly from some deli in Queens). Just last week I overheard Jack bragging to folks back in Queens on the telephone "You folks haven't even -dreamed- about a real kosher dill until you've had a Bubbies". California gourmet stuff is finally hitting its stride.

Tabasco Chipotle Bottled Sauce. Maybe it's from "Loozy-Anna" but this stuff is ***** Five Star. Five bottles into the luggage!

But somehow I have to score a couple bottles of Monte Xanic, as maybe it's hard to find down south. Better make that three: Carbernet Sauvignon, Faux Bordeaux, and Merlot.


alex .

Apr 29, 2003, 7:11 AM

Post #12 of 23 (6068 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Pig ears on the clothesline

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Then you could start some chisme: Some pigs tried sneaking into the compound while the Dobies were on patrol and that is all that is left....
Alex


Chumley

Apr 29, 2003, 1:43 PM

Post #13 of 23 (6035 views)

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Re: [Esteban] Thanks, jennifer..........

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Regarding the pickled ginger---the only place I have seen it in Mexico so far has been a restaurant in Ajijic, the Ajijic grill. The Dona who served us that evening even supplied us with some from the kitchen to take with us, and it lasted two months. PLEASE, if anyone on the forum knows a source for pickled ginger (I mean the real pink stuff) around the San Miguel area--Queretaro or Guanajuato or Celaya---please let me know.


jennifer rose

Apr 29, 2003, 2:10 PM

Post #14 of 23 (6033 views)

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Re: [Don Agustín] Thanks, jennifer..........

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Have you no sushi bars in San Miguel de Allende? Even the sushi served up at Morelia's Walmart comes with pickled ginger.

Try Trico in Queretaro. http://www.trico.com.mx.

I have a couple of containers of it -- the pink pickled kind -- in my refrigerator this very moment. But you're going to have to take back what you said about Chilangos. <g>


Chumley

Apr 30, 2003, 1:21 PM

Post #15 of 23 (6005 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Thanks, jennifer..........

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I appreciate the lead. We will check out the Trico in Queretaro soon. As for Sushi bars in San Miguel, there is one that calls itself such an establishment, but I would be hard pressed to patronize it. The only other place here that I have seen ginger supplied with California rolls, it was a pasty yellow color.

All right, substitute New Yorkers or Texans for Chilangos. But you know, even the native San Miguelenses have a problem with them during the weekends when they flood the town.


ET

Apr 30, 2003, 5:02 PM

Post #16 of 23 (5992 views)

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Re: [Don Agustín] Thanks, jennifer..........

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Don Agustín writes:
....The only other place here that I have seen ginger supplied with California rolls, it was a pasty yellow color...."


Hopefully that's with the California-maki and not in it.....

In its natural form, beni shoga, the Japanese pickled ginger (called gari when served with sushi) is a pale green-tinged yellow color. To add a touch of eye appeal and subtle flavoring, akajiso (purple shiso, aka "beefsteak" plant leaves) is often added to the ginger/rice vinegar/sugar pickling mix, yielding a light pink colored pickled ginger. The dark pink and red beni shoga is a product of the liberal use of food coloring.


(This post was edited by ET on Apr 30, 2003, 5:07 PM)


Chumley

May 1, 2003, 5:06 AM

Post #17 of 23 (5968 views)

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Re: [ET] Thanks, jennifer..........

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Truly, ET, your breadth of knowledge astounds me. There seems to be no topic on which you are not an expert. Or do you use a search engine to research posts on the forums and then rewrite the information in your own words? In any case, I appreciate the information regarding the care and coloring of ginger.


(This post was edited by Don Agustín on May 1, 2003, 5:09 AM)


ET

May 1, 2003, 7:38 AM

Post #18 of 23 (5956 views)

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Re: [Don Agustín] Thanks, jennifer..........

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The comments on ginger are from growing up with it. Other comments rise from (a) things I deal with on a day to day basis, for either work or entertainment, or (b) things I've investigated in figuring out how I'm eventually going to relocate to Mexico.


Chumley

May 1, 2003, 1:26 PM

Post #19 of 23 (5930 views)

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Re: [ET] Thanks, jennifer..........

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So then, that would make ET a person of Japanese descent if he grew up with ginger. As to relocating to Mexico, pack a bag and head South. You can't miss it.


jennifer rose

May 1, 2003, 6:38 PM

Post #20 of 23 (5906 views)

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Re: [Don Agustín] Sushi tonight!

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Thanks, Don Agustin, for suggesting that I have sushi for tonight's repast. And it was good. With extra pickled ginger and a hefty quantity of wasabi. For a flavor of Morelia's sushi offerings (with online ordering coming soon), see http://www.mikono-online.com/.

I asked the chef where he bought the pickled ginger, and he told me: Trico. And a restaurant supply in Guadalajara.


Rolly


May 1, 2003, 6:49 PM

Post #21 of 23 (5903 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Sushi tonight!

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I am a great sushi lover....but in truth, for me sushi is just something that goes well with pickled ginger. I eat that stuff like candy. But, alas, not in Lerdo.

ET -- Can it grow on the desert of northern Mexico?

Rolly Pirate


ET

May 1, 2003, 9:31 PM

Post #22 of 23 (5886 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Sushi tonight!

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Rolly writes:
ET -- Can it (ginger) grow on the desert of northern Mexico?


Sorry, Rolly, but like you, my interest in ginger starts later in the process flow, when the shokunin sets a small pile of the stuff in front of me, or when I'm pressed into service for Venerable Mom's New Years sushi preparation frenzy. For the latter, I've settled into my niche of broiling the unagi and cutting nori into various width strips for fences and decorative ties. I got promoted one year to slicing the makisushi, but got sent back to the minors after it was judged that I sliced the tekkamaki and kappamaki at too steep of an angle, and compressed the rice while slicing the futomaki. Fortunately I didn't have to atone for my errors by lopping off a digit.....

Resorting to a web-search engine I did locate several articles on growing ginger:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_MV067

http://www.fiacre.com/981141517

http://hometown.aol.com/NewJardin/ginger.html

http://www.theepicentre.com/Spices/ginger3.html

It looks like the native growing area is in the tropics, but you might be able to pull it off by growing it in pots. The biggest stumbling block is that it appears that you start from a live rhizome (root), which means you'd either have to locate a local source, or break agricultural quarantine and smuggle it into the country.

NB to Don: I've found that although I have an always-on high-speed internet connection, I still prefer to pre-think and compose my messages using a text editor, and wait and review my comments before pasting them into place. I also pick and choose which discussions I decide to participate in. Perhaps finished appearance and selective posting confuses you.


Chumley

May 2, 2003, 5:20 AM

Post #23 of 23 (5872 views)

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Re: [ET] Sushi tonight!

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Ah, ET, you have taken my jest and levity far too seriously. One big reason for my relocation to Mexico was to rid my life of self-imposed seriousness regarding living, when in fact life is not to be taken seriously at all, but to be savored and enjoyed. Much like sushi with ginger.

But, seriously ET, I need to ask you some questions. I pulled up a receipe online from Epicurious for California rolls. In the instructions they say, "Lay a dry sudare (a bamboo mat used for rolling sushi and other foods)..." Well, I went to a local deli and found what I thought was such an item, made in Japan, dimensions 9 1/2" X 8 1/4" called a "Sushi Makisu." Then a friend in the US by my request also sent a similar item, however it was made in Taiwan, measures 9 1/2" X 9 1/2" and although it is also labeled as a "SushiMaki Su" it is also called, in English, simply a Bamboo mat. My questions to you are these: Are these for making sushi or as place mats? And can you direct me to other websites that elaborate on the making of sushi, hopefully with illustrations?

Many thanks.

DA


(This post was edited by Don Agustín on May 2, 2003, 1:19 PM)
 
 
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